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Calorie Count Blog

Are 24 Hours Not Enough?


By Mary_RD on Feb 22, 2011 07:00 PM in Tips & Updates
Edited By +Rachel Berman

Proper planning makes getting it all done a reality.

By Beth Battaglino Cahill, R.N., Executive Director of HealthyWomen.org

A strong CEO must report to their desk before their employees each day.
   
You may be reading that statement and asking yourself, “But what does this have to do with weight loss?”

It’s just an old adage or figure of speech my mother once used when raising the six of us.  To her it meant ‘always get up before your children.’

But even if you don’t have children, are not employed, or are a mid-level employee at a small corporation, the sentiment stands the same: you must prepare for the day ahead!

Have you ever questioned where the day went or even wished there were more hours to fit in all of your to-dos?  What about carving out time for yourself in favor of a little pampering, exercise, or proper eating?  A CEO would never enter into a new year without a fiscal plan or arrive at a meeting without an agenda.  Why should your life be any different?

Know Your Pitfalls

Knowing the predicted pitfalls of your day and planning ahead will help you stay on track and ahead of the proverbial curve. 

  • If your mornings are manic, wake up 20-30 minutes earlier than everyone else to let your coffee kick-in and spend a few morning minutes in solitude.  

  • Check your calendar the night before to find healthy eating opportunities: big lunch with boss? Inspect your fridge for easy-to-prepare eggs as a light dinner; see if salad selections are on hand; or maybe just some cheese and crackers.    

  • On the road all day? Make sure to stay ahead of hunger with whole grains snacks, portable fruits and plenty of water.  Without those nagging hunger pangs you’ll be less likely to stop for fast food conveniences.  

  • Take time on Sundays to add menus to your evening calendar.  If all goes well, set them up for recurrences and you’ll never have to question “what’s for dinner’ again.  Think of it as a “Menu Business Plan”!

Plan Ahead

But no matter how hard we try to get organized and plan ahead, that one extra step can push “us” way down to the bottom of the priority list.  Don’t let that happen!  We can become so focused in life on taking care of others but – if we don’t take care of ourselves – who will be there to fill our shoes if we’re not?

Sharing is one of the fundamental lessons of life we learn early on; discover how to implement it today in other ways:

  • Figure out what isn’t making you happy and farm fifty-percent of the effort out to a loved one or colleaque.  Chances are your unique skill sets are different than those who are close to you which means swapping chores and errands might make you both happier!       
  • Can’t remember the last time you curled up with a good book?  Schedule regular events on specific days like those beloved pre-school days when “Show and Tell” Wednesday or “Crazy Sock” Thursday kept you going all week long.  Start thinking of Mondays as your day to practice stress relieving yoga at bedtime or lunchtime Fridays as a new opportunity to meet-up with forgotten friends.   
  • And don’t feel guilty about catching up on exercise or personal fitness during those Saturday morning sporting events.  Take a walk around the track or do some sideline stretches instead of watching idley from a folding chair.  With one eye on the field, you’ll still be able to spot every goal, touchdown or great play at the base!

Keep in mind when old habits begin to creep up just being a positive role model to those around you will only strengthen everything you do for them behind the scenes…like any successful CEO will do for their shareholders!


Your thoughts....

How do you manage to fit it all in?



Comments


There is a small problem with comparing a lifestyle change to a CEO. A CEO has accountants to make the fiscal plan and an assistant to draft the agenda, he adjusts it as he sees fit with their assistance.

And while waking up earlier might make it seem a little less frantic, there is the trade off of either less sleep or going to be earlier. The same goes for planning out the meals on Sunday, you might be saving some time in the week at the expense of your 'free' time on the weekend (and if you're like my family you won't feel like whatever you planned by the time you're supposed to eat it).



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I think it's great to have a basic plan, especially for writing a grocery list. If you have a few meal ideas you can make sure you have the foods on hand then decide that day what you want to make or what you have the time for. But that's easy for me to say since I work from home.

These tips might be great for some people, but for others Like radioactive-hamster above, these tips are not very helpful. C'est La Vie.



I agree that planning is important. Reminds me of my Geography teacher though:
"If you fail to plan, you plan to fail"



Original Post by: radioactive-hamster

There is a small problem with comparing a lifestyle change to a CEO. A CEO has accountants to make the fiscal plan and an assistant to draft the agenda, he adjusts it as he sees fit with their assistance.

And while waking up earlier might make it seem a little less frantic, there is the trade off of either less sleep or going to be earlier. The same goes for planning out the meals on Sunday, you might be saving some time in the week at the expense of your 'free' time on the weekend (and if you're like my family you won't feel like whatever you planned by the time you're supposed to eat it).


so true that!

i already get up at 4:50 AM and try my darndest to get to bed nlt 10PM... i once tried to get up at 3:30 to see if i could fit my hour + of evening exercise into my morning routine... i think i ran while sleeping and then  just dragged all day long...



I read somewhere, it might've been on Oprah's website, that you should make a list of everything you're supposed to do that day, and then don't do two of them. And don't feel guilty about not doing those two things.

I'm a heavy planner. I keep a planner in which I write down almost everything I have to do. I just turned down an opportunity to hang out with someone tonight because I already have plans for the evening (work errand, grocery store, gym).

But telling myself it's okay not to get everything done in one day has really lowered my stress levels!

BTW, I may seem anti-social, but I do like going to the grocery store and the gym! And the work errand is taking me to a spa, where I hope to make an appointment. Wink

I schedule a lot of stuff for myself every week night, but I also set a cut-off time. It's usually between 9 and 10pm. I say, "after 9:30pm tonight, I am not doing anything except what I want to do to relax," which is usually watching a favorite TV show, writing in my journal, stuff like that.

Anyway, I guess my point is, it's good to make plans, but don't beat yourself up about it if you have to change them, or don't get to everything. It's more important to balance happy stuff and task stuff.



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