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Calorie Count Blog

Adventures in Metabolic Testing


By Mary_RD on Oct 27, 2009 12:00 PM in Tips & Updates
Edited By +Rachel Berman

At ADA-FNCE last week, I had my metabolic rate measured at the Korr Medical Technologies booth. (I have no connection with them.)  I’ve always wanted to see my metabolism numbers and so I loved getting the report, but as you can see, the experience was an encounter of the dental kind.  Was the report worth the bother?  How did the results compare with the standard calculations?

The Test

The machine you see measures metabolic rate.  The account rep said the machine is in doctors’ offices (but not in my doctor's office).  The process is called "Indirect Calorimetry."  It calculates your calorie burn rate by measuring your oxygen uptake, which is a standard procedure that has been around for many years.

“Metabolism” refers to the rate at which you burn calories.  Calories at rest for physiologic functions is your BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate), sometimes called REE (Resting Energy Expenditure) or RMR (Resting Metabolic Rate).  The test also estimates the calories you burn performing ADLs (Activities of Daily Living), such as dressing and eating, and on PA (Physical Activity) like exercise or labor. Add up the three numbers to find your calorie requirements.  In addition, the metabolic test compares your BMR to a "predictive normal” to tell if you burn fast, slow or in-between (which is normal).  

The procedure entailed resting and reclining while breathing into a mouthpiece. My nose was clipped shut to force all air to pass directly into the chamber hooked to the machine.  (The guy who set me up neglected to tell me that I could remove the mouthpiece to swallow, and swallowing saliva was quite tricky.  Rrrrr…)  The test was completed in 10-12 minutes and the calculations were displayed on the screen and printed in a report.

The Results

First, let me say that I am particularly petite and getting on in years - so don't expect me to need many calories.  And then, I think I reported my height and weight correctly, but I can’t be sure.  And the testers knew I wasn’t completely fasted, but neither was I stuffed.

By machine, my calories burned were:

BMR: 1282 + ADL: 384 + PA: 133 = 1799 calories a day to maintain my weight.

  • Compared to normal, my metabolism is faster.
  • Activity = 30 minutes of walking at 3.5 miles per hour

By standard calculations, my calories burned were:

BMR: 952 + ADL: 286 + PA: 90 = 1328 calories a day to maintain my weight.

Discussion

Wow! Big difference - 471 calories or 26% - between the total calories burned as calculated by the machine and by the formula.  Compared to "normal", the machine showed I burn more calories at rest, with exercise, and in day-to-day living.  I guess my faster-than-normal metabolism made the difference. Perhaps it's because I have more muscle than some women my age and because my weight did not fluctuate throughout life.  And then there's my genes - or the test could be wrong.

Conclusion

To tell you the truth, I don’t trust the machine's results, not because it's inaccurate (because I think it is), but because I wasn’t tested correctly at the convention.  If I ever take the test again, I will take the average of three measurements to determine my height and weight and comply with the manufacturer's recommendations to fast for 12 hours, abstain from exercise for 48 hours and be tested in a quiet room. And then, I'll do the metabolic test two or three times and take the average before I believe the results. 

Calorie Count uses the Mifflin-St. Jeor formula to estimate BRM.  The formula is accurate by within 8.7% ± 6.0% and it is one of the most accurate formulas; however, The Journal of the American Dietetic Association reported, “…most prediction equations inaccurately estimate BMR in midlife women.  More research is needed to validate prediction equations for women across the adult lifespan.”

And so, as I've said before, calorie counting is inexact, but it’s the best we have. Calorie Count will keep up with the latest nutrition news for you.  Your job is to pay close attention to what you eat.

Your thoughts…

Have you had your metabolism tested?  What did you see? 



Comments


Thanks for the write up on this, I've never had my metabolism tested, but have also been very curious about it. I'd like to blame my metabolism, but when I really look at the amount of food I eat and calories I consume, I have to admit that's not the problem.  

I kind of think our bodies were designed to run on less calories because until the last 100 or so years, food was much harder to come by and not nearly so calorie dense. If the human body needed a huge calorie intake the human species would have collectively starved to death.  So in the past, the person who could go farthest on the least calories survived.  Gotta love evolution....



Interesting article.  I tend to agree with you about the machine results being off because of the environment.  It seems like too much of a disparity between the standard calculation and the machine results.  I know, for me, if I eat 400 calories a day over what I believe is my BMR (1320) I gain weight.  So while I would like the number to be 400 calories higher, I know it isn't from experience.



I would love to have this done.  Maybe it would help in determining if I am at the correct dosage of Levothyroxine for being hypothyroid.  I have been on the South Beach Diet since Oct. 12 and have lost 10 lbs already.  BUT, the days that I went off (2 days) and ate bread and had a donut one day... I gained a lb.

I have a sinking feeling that I will have to forgo things like bread, pasta, crackers, rice etc for the rest of my life if I want to lose this weight and keep it off.

So yes, I would love to know exactly where my metabolism stands compared to the "norm".

 



My caloric burn is estimated by the GoWearFit armband I wear.  It is similar to a BodyBugg.  I am almost 55, around 150 pounds and 5'5" - certainly in the "mid-life woman" category.   I burn over 2000 calories on a very slow day with no formal exercise.  Yesterday with 30 minutes of walking, 1 hour of spin class, and a lot of chores when I got home from my office job, I burned over 2900 calories! 

I know this is accurate because I can eat well over 2000 calories a day and not gain.  If I eat 2000 or less I will definitely lose weight. 

I would be interested to see what that machine calculates, but not interested enough to find one Smile



Thank you for your investigation.  I didn't know this test was available and I believe I will check it out since I, too have suffered with problematic metabolism due to a thyroid disease.  It's been a frustrating walk but I'm on a better path these days.  When the children were little it was much more difficult to have self control.  I'm getting it together!  Thanks for your article!



First of all, Mary-that just looked plain painful!!Undecided  So kuddo to you for doing this for us here, in the name of science and calorie-counting.  My general opinion is that if we follow the Mifflin-St. Jeor formula for BRM and follow our eating guidelines for calories and just get moving, we see results.  Science is great, as far as it goes.  But each of us is so intrinsically different, that a number is only a number.  Adjustments have to be made to our diet and exercise that work for each of us the best.  So I think I will skip the machines, for now. 



You don't have to pay a laboratory to know your metabolic rate. My DietPower software shows not only my personal metabolic rate, but also how to fluctuates from day to day -- and it tweaks my calorie budget daily to make sure I'm tracking toward my goal. I don't think any other program does this.



I've had this test done twice in my cardiologist's office. The first time was in September of 07 and I followed all the recommendations prior to the test. Based on my basic information--weight, height, age, level of activity--the machine predicted my RMR would be 1479. It actually was 1135--which went a long way toward explaining why I don't lose weight easily. I met with their staff dietician who helped me adapt the food pyramid guidelines to my caloric level.

One year later I retook the test. I had gained eleven pounds during the year (obviously not keeping to the caloric recommendations), but had increased my exercise. Based on my information, the machine predicted my RMR would be 1517, and it was 1418.

My doctor is hoping to see that by increasing exercise and muscle, that I can increase my RMR--allowing for a less stringent eating program.

This year we did not repeat the test. I have increased my exercise to four times a week and have lost twelve pounds. All my bloodwork was exactly where the doctor wanted it, so I just need to continue to be attentive to what I eat and how often I exercise.

I thought the test was very cool and actually restful (aside from the drool issue). I also like that I have some verifiable evidence that demonstrates that I really do need to eat very little food if I am going to lose weight and maintain the weight loss.

I hope this helps.



Original Post by: lastchancesue

I would love to have this done.  Maybe it would help in determining if I am at the correct dosage of Levothyroxine for being hypothyroid.  I have been on the South Beach Diet since Oct. 12 and have lost 10 lbs already.  BUT, the days that I went off (2 days) and ate bread and had a donut one day... I gained a lb.

I have a sinking feeling that I will have to forgo things like bread, pasta, crackers, rice etc for the rest of my life if I want to lose this weight and keep it off.

So yes, I would love to know exactly where my metabolism stands compared to the "norm".

 


Your weight gain on carbs was expected and not fat, you just restored the glycogen in your muscles and this added water back. This is normal with low carb diets since most of the initial weight loss is due to glycogen and the associated water. Did you really think you gained 1lb of fat (3500cals excess) in a couple days? That's a 1700 excess cals per day and impossible unless you camped out in front of the fridge.



I actually had my BMR tested about a month ago. Both the doctor and myself were surprised to find out how low it was- 1170, considering my age (27) height (1.62m) and weight (59 kg). He said this figure was about 16% lower than expected. I do have a thyroid problem but the gland works well according to my blood tests. My doctor was surprised that I was in good shape and quite fit. What can explain this odd situation?

I do work out a lot (I run, including interval training and lift weights around 4-5 times a week).

I was very disappointed by this figure although I look fine. It made me realize that  my metabolism was slow indeed and I will have to struggle with this sad fact forever. Whatsmore, I am bound to have an even slower BMR in the future, correct?

Still, can anyone explain this result versus reality? I do watch what I eat but definitely eat enough! Could something have a particular negative effect on my BMR at the time of taking the test?

Thanks,

Gili (Tel Aviv)



Such tests are notoriously inaccurate, and they measure BMR during a particular period on a particular day. Using my DietPower software (which actually measures my body weight changes in response to calorie intake and expenditures), I find fluctuations in metabolic rate as high as 25% over the course of weeks or months.

The best sensor for measuring your metabolic rate is your bathroom scale. But to use that, you need software that continually compares your calorie intake and expenditures with your weight change.



Original Post by: mercysullivan

I've had this test done twice in my cardiologist's office. The first time was in September of 07 and I followed all the recommendations prior to the test. Based on my basic information--weight, height, age, level of activity--the machine predicted my RMR would be 1479. It actually was 1135--which went a long way toward explaining why I don't lose weight easily. I met with their staff dietician who helped me adapt the food pyramid guidelines to my caloric level.

One year later I retook the test. I had gained eleven pounds during the year (obviously not keeping to the caloric recommendations), but had increased my exercise. Based on my information, the machine predicted my RMR would be 1517, and it was 1418.

My doctor is hoping to see that by increasing exercise and muscle, that I can increase my RMR--allowing for a less stringent eating program.

This year we did not repeat the test. I have increased my exercise to four times a week and have lost twelve pounds. All my bloodwork was exactly where the doctor wanted it, so I just need to continue to be attentive to what I eat and how often I exercise.

I thought the test was very cool and actually restful (aside from the drool issue). I also like that I have some verifiable evidence that demonstrates that I really do need to eat very little food if I am going to lose weight and maintain the weight loss.

I hope this helps.


to Alphecca, how do you get this Diet power software? that seems a cool and easy idea to track the weight



Original Post by: alphecca

Such tests are notoriously inaccurate, and they measure BMR during a particular period on a particular day. Using my DietPower software (which actually measures my body weight changes in response to calorie intake and expenditures), I find fluctuations in metabolic rate as high as 25% over the course of weeks or months.

The best sensor for measuring your metabolic rate is your bathroom scale. But to use that, you need software that continually compares your calorie intake and expenditures with your weight change.


Hmm I am about the same height as you-5 4ish, a year older than you but only about 51 kg. Online calculators say that my resting metabolic rate-so the lowest of the low is about 1250 so yours should be higher b/c you are younger (about 10 calories-15 calories for that) and mostly b/c of the diff in weight.

Heart rate monitor says that I burn around 1900-2100 a day with all activities combined. I do p90x and then throw in some more cardio and resistance training here and there so about 70 min-2 hours of exercise a day on average.

From experience, I do lose weight on around 1700 cals, and lose quickly enough to be noticeable on about 1400 but cannot eat below that without feeling faint and cold (Signs of metabolism shut down).

I will note that I'm more of the athletic type with about 17-18% body fat but I doubt the HRM is taking that into account-unless it's affecting my heart rate. Actually my resting heart rate is lower than average -as is the case with people who have been training cardio-wise for a long time. NOt to the athlete's level but still lower by about 5-7 beats per min.

Your metabolism might be sluggish if you're eating enough and exercising too much-trust me. This will correct itself in at most a week or so and you won't gain weight-trust me.



Original Post by: annschmech

Thanks for the write up on this, I've never had my metabolism tested, but have also been very curious about it. I'd like to blame my metabolism, but when I really look at the amount of food I eat and calories I consume, I have to admit that's not the problem.  

I kind of think our bodies were designed to run on less calories because until the last 100 or so years, food was much harder to come by and not nearly so calorie dense. If the human body needed a huge calorie intake the human species would have collectively starved to death.  So in the past, the person who could go farthest on the least calories survived.  Gotta love evolution....


I don't think evolution has anything to do with it. Rather, a change in society, the amount of mechanical work done in a day and the demands placed on our body have changed significantly.

If your statement about "those going the farthest on the least amount of calories survived" is true, then those with a larger bone structure would have gone extinct due to a higher resting metabolism. Obviously there are different types of bone structures so that kind of proves your theory incorrect.

My final say is this. People have done a great job of eating bad food (refined grains, fried meats) and lots of it in the past 200 years. We've also done a great job of minimizing the amount of movement that occurs in our daily life. So an increase in consumption and a decrease in calorie use adds up to extra energy that does not get used. It is these two things that have changed our nutritional needs. Not the changing of a human into some other type of creature.



Original Post by: alphecca

You don't have to pay a laboratory to know your metabolic rate. My DietPower software shows not only my personal metabolic rate, but also how to fluctuates from day to day -- and it tweaks my calorie budget daily to make sure I'm tracking toward my goal. I don't think any other program does this.


I agree. Our caloric requirements change from day to day. The amount of food we take in should reflect that requirement change.



Thanks for your comments guys :-)

Alphecca -I was also wondering how I could get this software. Also, as far asI know, there are different machines that measure one's BMR  - do you know, perhaps, if they differ in their accuracy?

Regarding lamia666's comment: "Your metabolism might be sluggish if you're eating enough and exercising too much-trust me. This will correct itself in at most a week or so and you won't gain weight-trust me." - did you mean "not eating enough"or eating enough?

Lastly, a general question - is there a way to increase one's BMR? Does building muscle make a real difference and do certain foods, from your experience, might have a boosting effect (e.g.I heard of berries etc. but am not sure).

Thanks again :-)



If you're talking about Acai berries, there is no good science supporting the claim that they increase BMR. They're basically just a good source of antioxidants.

DietPower offers a free 15-day trial at www.dietpower.com. You might want to check out their articles at http://my.dietpower.com/features/ too. Founder is an award-winning science journalist, doesn't parrot quackery and hype as many Web writers do.



I have a completely different outlook on the metabolism testing.  I have had prior LapBand surgery, lost 100 lbs with minimal effort, then slowly started gaining weight back.  My surgeon kept telling me to cut back on calories, cut back on carbs.  I had cut back to an average of 800-1000 calories per day, maximum.  A fellow LapBand patient purchased one of these machines and I was tested and simply amazed at the results.  To be in the weight loss zone, I needed to be eating 1879-2347 calories a day!  NO WONDER I WASN'T LOSING WEIGHT!!  As most of you can relate, I was absolutely petrified to start eating that many calories.  After a little bit of coaching from her, I decided I had nothing to lose because what I had been doing for 4 years wasn't working any longer.  With much hesitancy and some difficulty (it's hard to figure in that many calories when you are used to such restriction !), I began eating the recommended calories the next day.  One week later I had lost 4 pounds.  Since beginning this on 7/22/09, I have lost 20 pounds to date.  I had surgery 10/2/09 and have been on strict physical activity restrictions since then, so I am very thankful I have maintained and as of this morning, I have lost 1 more pound.  I am making every effort to still get the minimum amount of calories each day.  Normally, I am a very active person.  I work 3 jobs, go the gym 4-5 days a week, etc.  I am VERY pleased with my results since the metabolism testing.  It was a much better $75 spent than the $17,000 I spent on the LapBand.  Although I will admit, it was like 12 minutes of torture as I am very claustrophobic and it was extremely difficult for me to talk myself through those long minutes!  Though it was one of the more unpleasant things I have done recently, we have all endured worse, I am sure.  I would rather do that than go shopping for bigger fat jeans Cool

I think it's important to remember, there is no "magic" in weight loss.  There is no one secret ingredient that is going to make us all thin.  We, as individuals, need to find what works for us and stick with it.  I try not to discourage anyone from trying any one thing, but when my friends are starving themselves as I was doing, I am the first to do the scolding : ) The thing I now struggle with is to stop reading about all of the other "quick fixes" on the internet, on magazine covers, television, etc.  I found what works for me and I have to remember that I don't need ANYTHING else; that's the mistake I have made in the past. I'd find something to lose 5 pounds, then see something I thought may work better and jump to that, and so I fed the monster inside me and ended up getting fatter and fatter!


Also, I have to admit that I am by no means the perfect food eater.  If I want to use 500 of my calories on birthday cake, I eat the cake.  If I want a king size candy bar, I eat the candy bar.  I eat absolutely anything I want, but once I have reached my caloric limit for the day, that's it. 

I love CC!  This website is a little obsession for me that truly keeps me on track. 



Wow, sounds great - keep up the good work!

Which machine did you use? Do you refer to the "dietpower" software? I wish this will also be my solution - could it perhaps be the case that my BMR got slower when consuming around 1,400 calories daily and exercising vigorously? I wish! But I think metabolism gets slower only when one restricts him/herself to around 1,100 or less...?

Alphecca - thanks for the info - I'll definitely look it up asap. By the way-how can the software determine your personal metabolism? Sorry if I sound silly, but does it measure your oxygen usage, heart rate, etc?

 

 



Not silly at all : )  The machine information that is on my printout is KORR Medical Technologies, MetaCheck, Metabolic Rate Analysis System. Here is an excerpt from the information:The MetaCheck is an indirect calorimetry system that is designed to measure resting metabolic rate (RMR). The system operates by measuring the volume of oxygen consumed by the patient. Since every calorie consumed by the body requires a fixed amount of oxygen, oxygen consumed relates directly to calories burned.
The MetaCheck uses an oxygen sensor and a gas flow sensor to measure oxygen consumption. The MetaCheck system auto-calibrates these sensors before each use. The microcomputer in the MetaCheck device integrates the flow and oxygen signals to calculate the rate at which oxygen is consumed.
The “Douglas bag” is the “gold standard” method of validating the accuracy of oxygen consumption measuring devices, such as the MetaCheck. The Douglas Bag method uses a large, non-porous bag to collect all of the gas expired by the individual being tested. After the gas is collected, the volume, and oxygen concentration of the gas collected in the bag are analyzed. This analysis gives the total volume of oxygen in the bag. Based
on the bag contents and amount of time over which the bag was filled, the rate at which oxygen was consumed can be calculated.

Hope this helps.  Hospitals use machines such as these to determine the resting metabolic rate of comatose patients to know the exact caloric needs that individual requires just to maintain the basic functions of the brain, heart, and all vital organs.  Don't forget, those organs need calories before the rest of our body does : )  That's why when we aren't eating enough, we feel tired, sluggish, have memory loss, etc.


No, I haven't used the "dietpower" software.  I am going to avoid looking at it because this works for me and I don't need help getting off my chosen path!!! 


Personally, I think the metabolism slows at a different level for each person based on their individual needs/output/input.  I always thought mine was slow because I have always been overweight. However, based on my testing, I am 26% faster than a person of similar sex, age, height and weight. 



Giligili, DietPower "learns" your metabolic rate by comparing your weight change with your net calorie intake. This is far more accurate, because it shows how your body actually responds to calories.

Rlkc1973, there is a reason thousands of people use DietPower ($29.99) instead of paying hundreds for lab tests. It guarantees reaching your goal weight on your target date, or your money back up to a year later. I like a company that stands behind its claims that way.

 



The gym I belong to, LIFETIME FITNESS, has all of the equipment needed to test metabolism in this manner nad I have had the teest run 3 times in the past year, to measure my BMR and such and make sure that as I gain strength, increase cardio activity, and lose weight, that I am eating correctly.  In addition to performing the test at rest, they also perform the test during activity - treadmill - and they are able to calculate my heart rate zones based on the percentage of fat/carbs burned per minute while in activity.  This allowed them to set my heart rate monitor into my cardio zones accurately for ME, not based on general calculations.

So what do I think?

BRILLIANT!

when I first test in Dec 2008, my BMR was about 1600 and the nutritionist told me to never fall below 1600 calories per day, and to maximize weight loss, I would consume between 1600-1800 calories per day, plus I burned about 400-500 calories when I worked out, 6 times per week.

In my most recent test, after losing more weight and increasing my physical strength and cardiovascular performance, I was SHOCKED that my BMR increased to nearly 1800!!!  As I am losign weight, I am actually required to EAT MORE!!!!!  And my calorie burn rate during exercise also increased, and the percentage of fat to carb burned increased dramatically as well!

If you have the opportunity, definitely have this testing done, as the results are much more personal and accurate than a formula.  Anad as yyou become healthier, retest, because those numbers will change for sure!

YAY for METABOLIC TESTING!



Oh, and follow the instructions for accurate testing ... fast for 12 hours, no alcohol for 24 hours, no activity for 24-48 hours, etc.

I fforgot hte first time nad had some wine the night before nad the results were all jacked up and I rescheduled to take it accurately after following all instructions to prepare!



Alphecca, I am definitely not downing anyone's choices.  I was simply stating that for me, I have to stick with what is working for me.  I have the bad habit of thinking the grass is always greener on the other diet and I tend to  jump from one thing to another.  I have to keep my focus here for my benefit only.  I am not judging anyone, I am just happy with my personal experience and wanted to share that.  After 36 years of being overweight and frustrated, I am not ashamed to be happy about what works for me and I like to share my story with others.  What works for one does not work for everyone and I totally understand that.  I have not spent hundreds for lab tests; I spent $75.  That's about the cost of eating dinner out and for me it was money well spent.  I am sure you are as happy having spent $29.95 as I am about having spent $75.  The Surgeon who performed my LapBand surgery is now starting to use this machine in his office because he is so amazed with the results on his patient's who have been tested. The bottom line is, whatever it is, if it works, why change.  That's how many of us have ended up spending small fortunes on different weight loss programs.   DietPower sounds like a fantastic site and I will tell my friends to check it out if they aren't able to get the testing done.

Nancybehrend....WOW, what a great gym!  I go to Gold's Gym and they don't offer anything in comparison to that!  I see a suggestion for the suggestion box!!!  That is amazing what your metabolism has done!  It's such a great feeling to know you HAVE to eat more to weigh less and it really is true!!  Keep up the good work!



DietPower isn't "the other diet" -- it's just a tool that tells you how many calories you need and how well your nutrients are balanced.



Alphecca, this isn't personal!  It's a forum for everyone to post on.  I didn't mean "the other diet" in the literal sense.  Wow.



Hi Mary - How do you think this compares to the Bod Pod method?



Rlkc1973, I didn't take it as personal -- you implied that DietPower was a different diet than the one you are on. It isn't a diet at all.



Original Post by: bubsy911

Hi Mary - How do you think this compares to the Bod Pod method?


Hi Everybody,

The BOD POD measures body composition, which is percent body fat and fat-free mass.  The BOD POD does not measure basal metabolic rate directly, although I believe it can printout estimations of Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) and Total Energy Expenditure (TEE) based on the formulas (which could be more accurate since muscle mass is known, but I don't really know).  As far as I can tell, Diet Power, estimates basal metabolic rate based on the formulas but then uses the results from the heart rate monitor to estimate exercise calories burned.

My metabolic test was on a KORR Medical Technologies product, essentially like the MetaCheck Metabolic Rate Analysis System that rlkc1973 described.  I know the test is accurate except for human error (fasting, etc.), which I discussed.  I think the Korr instrument (and all Indirect Calorimetry) is very cool. Contact Korr customer services to find doctors in your area who do metabolic testing.

Thanks for using Calorie Count!

Mary



How much did it cost get the tests done?



"Calorie Count uses the Mifflin-St. Jeor formula to estimate BRM."

I had started my diet as per the calculations given for my daily calorie requirement. I figured that after 14 days my weight was more or less same even with a 700 calorie deficit diet.  

Thus I have come to the conclusion that the daily calorie number given by the above method is off by 700 calories.

I now believe you have to do your own calculation & find your metabolic rate. Each person is unique and thus no machine or general calculation can tell you your exact metabolic rate.

This has to be a trail and error method.



Original Post by: happy_haylee_3

How much did it cost get the tests done?


I don't know because mine was free at the convention.  I would think that every doctor who purchased the machine will set his/her own price.



Once again, you can know your metabolic rate continually if you use weight-loss software that compares your weight change with your calorie intake. DietPower (www.dietpower.com) is the one I use. I'm not sure whether any others do this. DietPower claims it's the only one. You can try it free.



You don't need software, just a simple spreadsheet will do the trick. Work out your weight loss over a certain period of time, this will give you the number of calories deficit you have, assuming it takes a 3500 cal deficit to lose one pound. Then add the number of calories you ate over this period (get this from your analysis on caloriecount) and you have the total number of calories you burned over that time, divide by the number of days and there you have your average calorie burn. It will get more accurate the longer the period you measure over, though I guess you should make it a moving average as you will bur less the more weight you lose - maybe do it over a one or two month period?



I had this done 2 weeks ago and was thrilled with the prospect of finally having some scientific numbers to work with. according to the manufacturer, one should not allow their caloric intake to exceed their RMR and never fall below 80% of their RMR. Consuming less than 80% will lead to a reduction in metabolism as the body begins to think its being starved. This lowering of the metabolic rate is the reason why these forums are full of people reporting no weight loss even though they are eating insainly low calories per day. The goal is to eat to your metabolism, no more. My RMR is 2650 Calories per day and I’m eating about 2200 per day and im dropping weight like mad. for the 1st time in my life, i feel like i know exactly what i need to do to control my weight. In addition to basic caloric maint, I'm eating smarter, whole foods, lean meats, smaller portions, and more often during the day. if anyone in the Tampa Bay, FL area wants to know where they can have this done for less than 40 bucks, message me and I'll find the guy's contact info for you.



Spreadsheet is fine, but it doesn't account for water loss or retention related to sodium intake or menstrual stage. DietPower does.



linuxianfl - are you a big guy?  That seems like a reallly high RMR.  PS - DARLING picture!!!

 



Just as a FYI, I am an exercise physiologist that uses the Korr REEvue machine for testing resting energy expenditures and I would suggest that you not heavily rely on the estimates that the REEvue calculates for your total calorie expenditure to be correct.  It assumes things that may or may not be correct for your unique body and daily activity levels.  What you can count on is the measured calories burned at rest based on your oxygen consumption IF you followed the prep instructions correctly.  The importance of finding out what your resting calorie expenditure amounts to is that this lets you know the LEAST amount of food you should eat if you are trying to lose fat weight.  Eating below your estimated resting energy needs can cause your body to want to hold on to stored fat and not freely use it when the need is there.  So if you get the test done take these steps to ensure that your test is as accurate as it can be:

1.  Follow the instructions for abstaining from food, caffeine, nicotine and exercise prior to the test.

2.  Breathe into the machine at as normal of a resting rate as you can.

3.  Ask the person running the test to extend the test to 15 minutes as a minimum.  The longer the testing sample runs the more accurate the daily average.

Using technology to measure the metabolic rate in activity and at rest is the new wave of the future.  We perform these tests along with others to design customized lifestyle change programs for clients.  It really works if you learn to listen to your body's signals.  Technology gives us the inside view of what your body is trying to tell you.  So go for it....but be wise in choosing a qualified person or service to work with. 

For more info contact us at www.meta-fitness.com ;

Just as a FYI, I am an exercise physiologist that uses the Korr REEvue machine for testing resting energy expenditures and I would suggest that you not heavily rely on the estimates that the REEvue calculates for your total calorie expenditure to be correct.  It assumes things that may or may not be correct for your unique body and daily activity levels.  What you can count on is the measured calories burned at rest based on your oxygen consumption IF you followed the prep instructions correctly.  The importance of finding out what your resting calorie expenditure amounts to is that this lets you know the LEAST amount of food you should eat if you are trying to lose fat weight.  Eating below your estimated resting energy needs can cause your body to want to hold on to stored fat and not freely use it when the need is there.  So if you get the test done take these steps to ensure that your test is as accurate as it can be:

1.  Follow the instructions for abstaining from food, caffeine, nicotine and exercise prior to the test.

2.  Breathe into the machine at as normal of a resting rate as you can.

3.  Ask the person running the test to extend the test to 15 minutes as a minimum.  The longer the testing sample runs the more accurate the daily average.

Using technology to measure the metabolic rate in activity and at rest is the new wave of the future.  We perform these tests along with others to design customized lifestyle change programs for clients.  It really works if you learn to listen to your body's signals.  Technology gives us the inside view of what your body is trying to tell you.  So go for it....but be wise in choosing a qualified person or service to work with. 

For more info contact us at www.meta-fitness.com



I went to see a dietition today and i had my metabolic rate tested by a breathing machine.

I found it very helpful as I found out I was undereating and so now I cant wait to start eating more!



Breath tests aren't very accurate, and measure metabolic rate only for a certain moment. I use DietPower (www.dietpower.com) instead -- it continually tracks your metabolic rate based on what is actually happening to the calories you take in, and adjusts your calorie budget to guarantee reaching your goal weight on your target date. They have a free 15 day trial, no strings attached. You can download it from www.dietpower.com.



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