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Calorie Count Blog

Beyond Pounds: The Rule of Three


By +Carolyn Richardson on Jan 03, 2012 10:00 AM in Tips & Updates

Looking at the Big Picture to Overcome Overweight and Obesity

There’s no shortage of information about how to lose weight, but when you choose what to do, don’t forget about YOU. If you’re looking to get to and maintain a healthy weight in 2012, changing your diet, exercise, and sleep habits will help you reach your goal. However, above pounds lost, behavior modification, which allows you to maintain your weight loss long-term, should be your ultimate objective. Before you place too much stock in a new regimen, explore the psychological aspects of why you act the way you do to reduce the risk of falling back into bad habits over time.  

Mind-Body-Spirit

Despite knowledge, resources, and the ability to lose weight, many are not able to translate their weight loss to a healthy lifestyle. Many times the reason for weight regain is due to an experiment mentality. We set a time limit, a weight goal, and attempt to create controls of what we will and won’t do, all while obsessing over our jean size. Is this any different than treating yourself like a rat in a maze? You are not only body, but mind and spirit. Yes, you should desire a healthy weight, but seeking overall health is key. Analyze what may be behind bad eating habits and lack of exercise and address those issues as you come up with your weight loss plan. Observe and write down certain circumstances, attitudes and habits in your life that may threaten your maintaining a healthy weight. As you create a diet and exercise plan, consider changing certain variables that may be a hindrance to you, or come up with coping mechanisms for things you can’t control.

Measurements-Fitness-Wellness

Being overweight or obese is a problem in so much that it is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Instead of obsessing about getting to an “ideal” weight, let your motivation be to realize the health benefits that can contribute to a longer, more abundant life. Two separate studies, one on diabetes, the other blood pressure, found that a weight loss between 5% and 15% of baseline weight can have significant health benefits. So while 50 and 100 pound success stories are real, don’t let the scale be your only predictor of success. As you lose weight, keep track of every aspect of your health, including body measurements, biological tests such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Consider testing your fitness as well. Last, consider stress and mental health tests. Monitoring each of these will help you see how healthy habits effect the whole you, not just the scale.

Small-Medium-Large

While it’s true that you should not have French fries daily, think realistically about your ability to completely cut out certain foods as you lose weight. Too much restriction may cause binge eating later on. You’re a Calorie Count member, so you understand that healthy eating is about monitoring your portions and creating a caloric deficit if you want to lose weight. To that end, change your mindset from what not to eat, to what "size" certain foods play in your lifestyle. Large portions of veggies, medium portions of fruit and whole grains, and small portions of meat, fats and processed foods will generally create a nutritious meal. While the site does give you specific daily calorie counts to stick to, over time, learning to instinctively choose the right portion sizes is what will keep your healthy lifestyle on track.


Your thoughts…

Share the rules you stick to that are helpful rules that have helped you lose weight initially and/or keep the weight off?  



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Comments


Very helpful to maintain weight



I'm going to save this article for when I get to maintenance. I've always had tons of ideas of what I would do when I got thin, and this is now on the list. Have lost 60 lbs in the last year, here's hoping for another 60 this year!



I love this article because this is what I have been telling people myself when they see that I have lost weight!  

First, the part about this being a lifestyle and not a "diet" is essential.  If this is a diet then all I am doing is setting myself up for failure.  But it is a lifestyle because I want to continually pursue doing what got me thus far--such as eating differently.

Second, I also have been telling people about the importance of not restricting foods out so much so that it becomes obsessive.  This has been my Christmas vacation and while on it I have had to learn how to enjoy unhealthy treats in small portions.  People give me looks, but hey, I can still enjoy a smaller size portion over a larger size, and maybe even try a smaller sized portion of something else.  

Overall, it is hard to cut out everything unhealthy, but that is not what it is about.  It is about figuring out how to make this apart of ourselves so that one day we do not have to come to Calorie Count--the information will all be in our brains.



This is a great site.  It is well written by intuitive and knowledgeable people. It is not a fad.



I love the section on mind - body - spirit.  I live by the fact that diets don't work and you must have a lifestyle change. You must adapt to a new way of life.  I am living in maintenance mode now.  I don't want to lose anymore but I don't want to gain; it is a delicate balance, but I am determined to find the key. 



Extremely good article.  I truly think this is the route to success, not just for maintenance but even for weight loss.  I decided last year that the only way to lose successfully was for me to be able to eat 'normal' foods... I live with hubs and DS who don't have much trouble with weight.  We don't eat much processed foods, I cook from scratch so knew I could control what went into recipes.  The key for me was not to feel deprived.  What's the use of cutting out all carbs/fats etc if when you finally reach your goal you start eating all of this stuff again.  Plus... yes you are more prone to binge faced with this atitutude.  So I decided that limiting foods I like but are not good for weight loss means I can have it... just not every day.  Smaller portions, more veg and fruit, less meat have meant I have been able to continue to lose albeit slowly.  I found starting with walking short distances and adding to the distance over a matter of time helped me feel fitter even though I wasn't losing weight... I was losing inches overall. 



While this article provides good directives and rationales that most people can accept, the day to day living in a body one finds unacceptable is not transformed by rationale.  I am recovery now for 27 years from bulemia and a life obsessed with controlling my food (and everything, everyone around me(.  After years of great efforts that would succeed and then painfully fail, I joined a 12-step program (OA) as the last resort.  I say "last resort" because OA forces self-acceptance, transparent living (impossible if food is the most intimate lover one has), and responsibility for one's actions.  Today, I am normal.. that said, I did finally join a health club and start over because I had gained weight slowly following a hysterctomy 17 years ago.  Like 2 pounds a year.  All that is gone...and I feel fabulous.  However, I remain pained for those I see around me on the new (which is not new) HCG diet...as the other side of the mountain is a long way down...  Weight watchers was one of the methods I tried...however, as a compulsive over-eater, it worked only so long and was far too much about food.  I celebrate with all of you your successes and encourage you to look life whollistically.  For, me, it was about ALL of who I am, not merely about the weight and physical space my body took up. 



Article makes good points about having long term health goals and not just weight loss objectives. I find my self driven to eliminate cholesterol and triglyceride reducing drugs that have I taken for years. Already ditched the high blood pressure drug, and last blood analysis looks super with most readings off the chart low. I've lost 68 pounds so far which is cool. My target is eliminating all maintenance drugs. Another motivating goal is to improve physical conditioning to enable doing physical activities that have become hard to accomplish in recent years (having reached 65). Need long term goals to maintain life style changes.  Laughing



This is a really good article. Rule of three; easy to remember.



My problem is having small portions come 'naturally' to my eating habits. I like vegetables, not to interested in sweets, exercise for fun, but unless I track my calories I will eat too much. I am looking for a way of making 'slightly hungry' the new normal.


Excellent timing! I lost 50lbs between March 2010 and March 2011 using Calorie Count. Then went into maintenance mode. At first I did fine, then slowly started slipping back into old habits. As of today, I've gained half of the weight back. Also, as of today, I'm back on Calorie Count to re-lose the 25 lbs. I'm disappointed the I regained but I am also more resolved to do a better job in maintenance once I get there again. This article was excellent. I, too, shall save it for later reference.


Great article...  I am convinced that the weight loss goal has been my undoing in the past, as I've lost and gained more times than I can count.

This time, I am approaching this with the wisdom that my experience has taught me.  The weight is a symptom only - as is my high blood pressure - of a larger problem:  Lifestyle.   I can treat the symptom, or fix the real problem.  I need to eat healthier, move more, and deal with my emotional issues like a grown-up - head on, and not with a fork.

I'm 48... and healthier now than I was at 28.  I am excited for the future... it's gonna be great!



Original Post by: ssmi616100041

While this article provides good directives and rationales that most people can accept, the day to day living in a body one finds unacceptable is not transformed by rationale.  I am recovery now for 27 years from bulemia and a life obsessed with controlling my food (and everything, everyone around me(.  After years of great efforts that would succeed and then painfully fail, I joined a 12-step program (OA) as the last resort.  I say "last resort" because OA forces self-acceptance, transparent living (impossible if food is the most intimate lover one has), and responsibility for one's actions.  Today, I am normal.. that said, I did finally join a health club and start over because I had gained weight slowly following a hysterctomy 17 years ago.  Like 2 pounds a year.  All that is gone...and I feel fabulous.  However, I remain pained for those I see around me on the new (which is not new) HCG diet...as the other side of the mountain is a long way down...  Weight watchers was one of the methods I tried...however, as a compulsive over-eater, it worked only so long and was far too much about food.  I celebrate with all of you your successes and encourage you to look life whollistically.  For, me, it was about ALL of who I am, not merely about the weight and physical space my body took up. 


Well said!!! I am now focusing on exercising realizing if i lose calories and I am out of shape it helps no one, I will still be subject to muscle strain and bad habits, I am 1 week into it and know it will be a good 6 to 8 weeks to see major improvements.  Until I pulled a muscle recently I did not see the corelation between muscle tone and weight.  I can lose calories, but if my muscle tone is poor, I may be losing muscle.  I am seeing weight go down but need to find (measuring?) a new standard to go by.



This is why I have made Karen Carpenter my hero.  She weighted very little and was skinny, but not healthy.  I miss Karen, but I will be healthy as well as slim.



Original Post by: lionfish1

This is why I have made Karen Carpenter my hero.  She weighted very little and was skinny, but not healthy.  I miss Karen, but I will be healthy as well as slim.


...more like an anti-hero.  She was beyond skinny.  She wasted away until there was nothing left to sustain life.  Sad, sad woman who sang such happy, wonderful songs...



Very helpful article :)



Great article, great timing.  For the 1st time since 2008, I weighed more on New Year's Day than I did the year before - a mere 3 pounds - which for some reason terrified me.  Rationally - I know this is silly -my weight is fine.  I'm healthier and stronger today than I was last year:  I can run more than 6 miles, and last year, at 3 pounds less, I could barely finish 3.   Still.... something about that number..... This article helps me realize that finding and keeping BALANCE is a daily task.  Something's out of whack when a number makes you feel this bad.  The body's ok; it's just my mind playing tricks on my spirit.  It's ok to be reminded that this is something that needs thought and attention every single day.

 



Here's my Rule of Three: Poisons to Avoid- meat, dairy and processed foods.

When eating only plant-based real/whole food the body naturally maintains optimum health, weight,  & energy. I am the only person my age (66) I know who is not on medication for some "condition" (high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, etc.) caused by eating "foods" that poison the body.

Wise up! Meat is not only murder for the innocent & sentient animals tortured & killed, but slowly poisons the human body that consumes it.



If you are running and exercising that much, you may be 3 lb. heavier but in muscle mass, not fat.  You probably are firmer and fitter than one year ago. 



Great article and true.  I'm half way through establishing my new eating habits, while losing weight (again).  This is one of a few major weight losses in my life, I am 55.  Twenty years ago I lost 112 lbs. and within 8 months of maintenance I had fallen off the wagon and binged on everything.  I never even got to adjust to a maintenance plan before my thin and healthy world just fell apart when my family routine had to make a change.  I thought I was doing everything right . . . I ate healthy, exercised regularly, kept a journal, and started making plans on how to stay on track, etc.   What I didn't count on is my mental and spiritual side of the equation. 

Some questions I asked myself and comments I had back then and revisiting this time to avoid making the same mistakes again----

Why am I eating chocolate syrup [or you fill in the blanks] by the cup full after 2 years of being the model dieter/exerciser?  Why don't I care if I re-gain 5, then 20, then 60, all the way back to 112 (and in later years another 30) before I do something about it? Especially when I had worked so hard to lose it!!!!  Why, all of a sudden (after reaching my goal), do I let perceived negative comments of family, friends, or strangers defeat me?  Why is my self talk still so repulsed with my fat image, yet so comfortable with keeping it?  Why do I still feel like 4 servings really should be one?  Why do I 'think' I feel good and satisfied when I am really stuffed and bloated from eating too much?  I want to do something else in life besides walk, walk, walk, and count calories! Why is that extra few bites so irresistible when I know it is going to add an extra XXX calories and in time will turn into XXX pounds? There are many more.

Some of the questions I have answered and some I've overcome, some I may never figure out.  Maybe it is just age and wisdom, but I know 'healing' the WHOLE person is very important when it comes to weight loss and maintenance and overall health. And, it is a life long process of learning and evolving.

I know I can lose the weight and this time I will maintain it, because now I know I need to nurture the mind and soul as well.



Congratulations on your loss! I can't wait- weight- to be where you are! I am currently at my heaviest at 241!!! It was a real shock when I stepped on the scale! I am proud of the work you have done!!!

Laughing



Original Post by: pcoo750452863

Great article and true.  I'm half way through establishing my new eating habits, while losing weight (again).  This is one of a few major weight losses in my life, I am 55.  Twenty years ago I lost 112 lbs. and within 8 months of maintenance I had fallen off the wagon and binged on everything.  I never even got to adjust to a maintenance plan before my thin and healthy world just fell apart when my family routine had to make a change.  I thought I was doing everything right . . . I ate healthy, exercised regularly, kept a journal, and started making plans on how to stay on track, etc.   What I didn't count on is my mental and spiritual side of the equation. 

Some questions I asked myself and comments I had back then and revisiting this time to avoid making the same mistakes again----

Why am I eating chocolate syrup [or you fill in the blanks] by the cup full after 2 years of being the model dieter/exerciser?  Why don't I care if I re-gain 5, then 20, then 60, all the way back to 112 (and in later years another 30) before I do something about it? Especially when I had worked so hard to lose it!!!!  Why, all of a sudden (after reaching my goal), do I let perceived negative comments of family, friends, or strangers defeat me?  Why is my self talk still so repulsed with my fat image, yet so comfortable with keeping it?  Why do I still feel like 4 servings really should be one?  Why do I 'think' I feel good and satisfied when I am really stuffed and bloated from eating too much?  I want to do something else in life besides walk, walk, walk, and count calories! Why is that extra few bites so irresistible when I know it is going to add an extra XXX calories and in time will turn into XXX pounds? There are many more.

Some of the questions I have answered and some I've overcome, some I may never figure out.  Maybe it is just age and wisdom, but I know 'healing' the WHOLE person is very important when it comes to weight loss and maintenance and overall health. And, it is a life long process of learning and evolving.

I know I can lose the weight and this time I will maintain it, because now I know I need to nurture the mind and soul as well.


pcco... you are singing my song..... I'm in a good place at the moment(I took 60~ pounds off about 2 years ago) but it's still a daily struggle with myself.

I have asked myself many of the same questions... and at times I've even thought I had some answers, but without constant vigilance, I still find those "extra few bites so irresistable"   I like your attitude - maybe we're not meant to know all the answers, but a little nurturing of the mind and soul might take some of the sting out of not knowing. Smile



Thanks, Kathy.

One of the first things I learned back then is to love myself no matter what size I am.  Self acceptance is easier said than done for many of us, but even if we don't feel it, we have to have faith in our self worth, no matter what.

It was devastating to regain 100 lbs. in half the time it took me to lose it. I HAD to hold my head up (even in shame). I then maintained that excess weight for 20 years before I decided to try again with a totally different mindset about food.

These days excess portions and certain foods don't seem to tempt me like they once did. I'm finally learning balance.

 



Dear gerg6z, I too have had to deal with pre diabetes 2, weight gain, high blood pressure (so in 2007 - I was lucky to find a book written by Dr. Neal Barnard's Program for Reversing Diabetes without drugs.  Now don't laugh - but after years of overeating the wrong foods I did what he offered and it totally worked, I took the book to my Dr. and she helped me by taking the blood tests that I needed, I kept up with the daily multivitamines and decided that I really did eat most all of the foods recommended before, but I ate things that made my condition worse and it was out of control.  Back to the book and also The Glucose Revolution to compare what agreed with Dr. Neals book - I determined that with my Dr.s help and monitoring, I could do it and I did.  I was way underweight in 2009 @ 51.5Kilo and had to slowly climb back up for my maintenance.  I am now at a stabelized 54Kilo fully dressed and have maintained at age 70 - am very happy with my lifestyle and have really enjoyed my talent for cooking and inventing what I can do with rice milk, cocoa, 1/2 tsp raw cane sugar, hot :)  My Blood Pressure which was low at a younger person has returned, my Blood glucose is all testing within the limits, and my triglicerides are low as they are small amounts and mainly from plants and seeds, nuts:)  You can too!  But get informed as much as possible - read as this diet says it was done without exercise so after I started loosing in 2007, I decided to visit a very good friend and we now walk our dog every am & pm, all store and banking is done on foot, added exercise is indoors.  I am so glad to be alive and help where ever, who ever I can, because that helps ME.  Thank you so much for letting me help, and Remember - balance.:) aea



Very helpful article!Smile



Rules you can certainly live by.  I'm one of those 100 lb weight loss success stories and I have maintained that weight loss for 6 months now using a similar philosophy.



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