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Calorie Count Blog

Breakfast Staples: Save Calories and Time at Home


By +Carolyn Richardson on Apr 21, 2012 10:00 AM in Healthy Eating

I’m a sucker for a hearty breakfast. In my childhood, I woke to the sound of eggs cracking and breakfast potatoes sizzling, so I understand the need for a filling meal to start the day. The trouble is, many of us don’t have the time or energy to cook in the morning. But you may want to rethink your motivations. If you could save time, money, and calories by making your own breakfast, would you carve out a few more minutes in the kitchen? We hope so. Even if it’s an every other day commitment, making breakfast at home could be the key to keeping your calories in check.

Oatmeal

McDonald’s Fruit and Maple Oatmeal carries a nutritional value similar to a Snickers bar. Aside from the 5 grams of fiber and 4.5 grams of fat, the 290 calories, 57 grams of carbs (32 grams of which is sugar) as well as the light cream (yes cream, not milk), make it a treat, rather than a healthy breakfast choice. Instead, buy rolled oats and add skim milk or soymilk. Instead of the dried fruit, add fresh fruits such as blueberries or an apple. You could save upwards of 100 calories, 31 grams of sugar, and a little over a dollar if you made the meal at home. If you make a batch one time a week, and make a cup each day in the microwave, you’ll only need an additional minute on workdays. If you like Starbucks’ “Perfect Oatmeal” you’ll be eyeing 390 calories if you add all the toppings they give you. In addition to the 140 calories in one serving of their oatmeal, the brown sugar (50 calories), nut topping (100 calories), and dried fruit topping (100 calories) can really add up. For about the same amount of calories, you could have two hard-boiled eggs (156 calories), a 1/2 cup oatmeal (83 calories), a cup of strawberries (48 calories) and an ounce of cheddar cheese (114 calories) for breakfast at home. Jamba Juice’ Steel-Cut Oatmeal served plain with the added brown sugar is 220 calories with no added fruit or nut toppings.  

Eggs

Subway’s Sunrise Subway Melt clocks in at 470 calories, 17 grams of fat, and 1590 mg of sodium. You could make your own egg and cheese sandwich at home. Take one slice of 100% whole wheat toast cut in half (50 calories), one fried egg (90 calories), and a slice of low-fat cheddar cheese (48 calories). That’s just below 200 calories. Add a slice of tomato and other fresh veggies to rev up the nutritional value. You’ll save about two dollars making this at home as opposed to buying it at Subway. In the way of time, because most Subways do not have a drive thru, the time it will take to park and wait for your made-to-order sandwich to be made could be used eating at your kitchen table. A good option while out is Dunkin’ Donuts’ Egg White Turkey Sausage Flatbread Sandwich. While the sodium content is also high, at 770 mg, 280 calories and just 8 grams of fat is reasonable.

Pancakes 

Another breakfast staple, pancakes, really adds up when you are eating out. Each small pancake made at home could account for around 160 calories. That's not counting the butter, margarine or syrup many of us add on top or the oil or milk, pancake mix may call for. To keep the calorie count in check, add fresh fruit instead of butter or make a fruit compote of berries with a splash of orange juice as a syrup. So you know, just two pancakes at Denny's will cost you 330 calories, 4 grams of fat and 1170 mg of sodium. At IHOP, you're looking at 490 calories for three pancakes. If you go for these, save 100 calories just by asking that the tablespoon of butter be left off of your plate. Just a tablespoon of syrup is almost 50 calories and 12 grams of sugar. If you choose to have syrup, instead of pouring it directly on your pancakes, ask for a separate small container. On another note, unless you specifically purchase maple syrup, it is largely a thing of the past. A quick glance of the ingredients reveals high fructose corn syrup on many familiar brands' touting maple flavored syrup. 


Your thoughts...

Now that you're counting calories, what constitutes a hearty, but healthy breakfast for you?



Comments


My favorite hearty breakfast is an egg white omelet with spinach, tomato and mozzarella cheese (no potatoes, no toast). On the go, it's an egg white with tomato and cheese on whole wheat bread (no butter). Of course I do go off track once in awhile and enjoy french toast with bacon (maybe twice a year) but the baddest breakfast I love to eat is bagel, lox, cream cheese and raw onion! (That's not even once a year for me now...)



3/4 C Plain nonfat yogurt, 1 scoop vanilla whey powder, 2T wheat germ, 1/4 c blueberry flax granola, or 2 T flax meal, 1/4 cup blueberries, a teaspoon of homemade spice mix (2 parts fenugreek,1 part cinnamon, and 1 part combined nutmeg, cloves, ginger, cardamom and star anise -- or just use 1/2 t cinnamon); low-sodium V8 with lemon juice.



My hearty breakfast is an asparagus, mushroom, and 2 egg omelet.  I add 1 piece of sprouted grain Ezekiel toast and 1/2 cup of strawberries.  



2 oz smoked salmon, 5 Akmak crackers, 2 Tbsp lite cream cheese.  No bagels but all the taste and enjoyment especially if you add capers and red onion slices to top of the salmon.

 



Was eating a big breakfast out of habit.  Discovered that a slice of sprouted wheat bread no butter with a little peanut butter is all I needed and that combined with calorie counting for the whole day had me dropping pounds off at a really fast rate.    17 lbs in 20 days.   What a surprise, used to be such a battle to take off a few pounds.  :-)  :-)   woooeeee!!!



These are great ideas for breakfast! I enjoyed 1/2 cup cottage cheese,with 1 tblsp flax seed and bran (same)and 1 pineapple slice chopped ...mmm then a small apple to finish ..oh yes,mixed tlbsp granola in there too...just trying to make breakfast a habit..look forward to reading more ideas.i make my own bread..what is spouted bread Rodney?



1/2 cup grapes cut in half, 1/2 cup low fat yogurt and 1/4 cup Great Grains with raisins and dates... doesn't sound like much, but it does fill me up!  And I keep a protein drink on hand to sip from if I get hungry before lunch. 



I love my Blueberry Spinach smoothie. And with the added 2T flax, 85 g tofu, and 1T blackstrap molasses it has over 30% of my daily calcium and iron requirements. And better still it keeps me going till lunchtime, even with 60 minutes on the treadmill! It is a bit high on the calories at 270 calories, but I think it is worth it for such a nutrient packed drink.



1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt, 1/4 cup Bob's Red Mill Meusli, 1/2 banana, additional seasonal fresh fruit



Hi Everyone, I just sign of with the Calorie Counter and the reason is I just did the Master Cleanse and I lose 18 Pounds and I would love to maintainent my weight and lose more in the future. Hope to join everyone and have a support.

My all time breakfast is 2 eggs omelet with garlic, pork sausage, n small salad or half cup of rice. and low fat yogurt if I get hungry before my next meal.

Is it make different if I eat organic products(try to eat healthy) At home I always have everything organic and try to keep that ways. 

 



3/4 cup of Quaker Oats w/ two teaspoons of brown sugar and 1/8 cup of low-fat milk, and two eggs scrambled with a sprinkling of low-fat cheddar cheese and 1/8 cup of low-fat milk added to the eggs.



A lite English muffin with apple butter is low calorie and filling.


Boiled egg on crispbread with cheese spread and cucumber + a small banana.



Quinoa flakes add water and microwave 2 minutes put scrambled rewrites on top and a couples cups of spinach steamed and a tsp truffle oil or any seasoning for a savory treat.


during the week......1/2 cup oats 90 seconds in the microwave, when done top with 1/2 cup frozen mixed berries....stir in and enjoy...

with a little more time on my hands, i like a one egg, two egg white onion and mushroom omelet topped with half of an avocado sliced.

simmer 1/2 cup Bulgar in 1 cup water for about 15 minutes, add 1/2 cup frozen mixed berries, take off the heat, cover for 5 minutes

 

 



My favorite breakfast is an egg sandwich. It consists of 2 slices of Sara Lee's whole wheat thin sliced bread. Each slice is 45 calories and it's a whole grain. I toast the bread. I fry an egg with a mere 1/2 T butter. I cook one piece of center cut bacon in the microwave at the same time. If you don't hard cook the egg, there is no need for butter or mayo on the bread. On the side I have a nectarine.

All of the above takes me about 15 minutes to do in the morning. It comes in at 336 calories. I try to keep my meals to 300-350 calories as I eat small meals throughout the day. I keep my daily intake to 1400 calories and then take Sunday's off.



I have to have a variety of things to eat or I get bored. My favorites - quick and easy, two boiled eggs, lose the yolk on one, and it keeps me going until 11am. Or I'll do a smoothie-1 tbsp whey protein powder, 3/4 c. fruit, 1 c yogurt, a few splashes of 1% organic milk, and it keeps me until lunchtime. We like the whole grain bread with nuts and seeds, but it's 160 calories for one slice, so it's a treat, but I'll toast it with peanut butter and jam, that also keeps me going for the morning.  I also will fix oatmeal, either Quaker old fashioned or Bob's Red Mill multigrain.  



what is a master cleanse??



My breakfasts usually consist of a Thomas' Light English muffin, 2 egg whites scrambled and a light cheese stick. I don't need much.....



I make myself a cup of coffee with skim, soy, or almond milk,,without sugar. i also drink a cup of green tea. My main meal..will consist of a smoothie I make myself..it consists of my healthy milk, a banana, another fruit, granola or another cereal, spinach or avocado, chai or sunflower seeds, whey or protein powder, and cinnamon..luv it..!



I'm a big breakfast eater! My daily calorie intake is about 2000-2200, so I like to make my breakfast about 650 cals and then eat 4-5 smaller meals during the day:

Two hard-boiled eggs One 100-calorie pack of Quaker instant oatmeal 6 oz chobani plain nonfat Greek yogurt One banana with two tbsp all natural peanut butter

I used to do granola in the yogurt instead of the pb but I find I feel more satisfied cutting out processed/added sugars entirely


What is a master cleanse? Sounds like this would be a great kick start to a healthy eating


I start my morning with a variety of Green Smoothies.  My favorite is what I call the Good Morning Good Day Smoothie.  It consists of 1 cupof Coconut Milk, 1 pear, 200 grams of Strawberries, 1 small Mango, 1 Kiwi, 150 grams of Kale, 150 grams of Spinach, 2 tbps of Ground Flaxseeds, 10 ice cubes and 1 scoop of 100% Vanilla Whey Protein.  This recipe makes three large delicious servings.  Each serving has 230 calories.  I have one serving at 8:00 AM and see patients until 1:00 PM when I have lunch.  You need a high speed blender like a Vita Mixer or a BlendTec, which I use.  Try it you’ll love it, and as the seasons change, change the fruits and greens you use.





You know, I feel like these "meals" are just TOO LOW in calories.  If you eat these tiny meals, you're going to be STARVING in about an hour!  

I learned that I need to have at least 300 to 400 calories per sitting.  If I do that about 5 times throughout my day, I'm coming in at 1500 to 2000 calories.  Plus, since I'm eating every few hours using the Half Meal Habit I'm NEVER hungry!  That's a big one for me...I HATE that feeling!

 



I just finished eating my breakfast. 1/4 cup Organic GF Corn Flakes, 3/4 cup Corn Chex, 2-3 Strawberries sliced, a few Blueberries and Blackberries, 1 tbsp Sliced Almonds, 1 tsp Chia Seeds, 1/2 cup Unsweetened Almond Milk.

Plus a Calcium supplement and a Multi Vitamin with Iron.

Then I had about a Tbsp of Unsalted Soy Nuts.

All of that came to 353 calories, and it was very satisfying. (Plus it's a nutrition grade A)



1. Fast, easy, and filling breakfast - 1/4 thick oats (89 cents/ pound bought in bulk), microwaved for 4.2 mins in 8 C measuring c (it will spill over the top if you don't use this large measuring cup). Add 1/2 chopped apple and cinnamon. On Sundays for a treat I add chopped almonds and dried cherries,

2. 1 C kashi cold cereal with sliced banana and skim milk - fast easy and lots of protein.

 

 



exbiker_cj asked about sprouted bread.  Sprouted breads are made without flour, but use sprouted grains instead.  The brand I use is "Food For Life", either the Genesis or Ezekie bread.  In my area these breads are found in the frozen section.  There are several varieties and they are delicious! They are dense breads, organic, a complete protein, filling, high in fiber and yummy.  They are not like the traditional soft grocery store breads so expect something quite different.  About 80 calories per slice and a bit pricey, but worth every cent/calorie. 

 



lasparrot...could you post the complete recipe for your blueberry spinach smoothie?  Thanks!



Hi, My favorite low calorie breakfast is French toast made with 40 cal bread,Egg Beaters, and sugar free syrup or egg sandwich with 40 cal bread and Egg Beaters,FF cheese with onion and green pepper. Both good and low calorie.



Cannot help but posting this, a little long but some great info!!

 

8 Food frauds on your shopping list

By Kelli B. Grant, SmartMoney Most consumers know to ignore emails alerting them to foreign lottery winnings and to steer clear of "designer" bags sold on street corners. But experts say even scam-savvy shoppers may be falling prey to fraud at a surprising place: the grocery store. Food fraud -- the adulteration, dilution or mislabeling of goods stocked on the shelf -- is part of a growing trend of faux household goods . Although there is little data on the frequency of food fakery, experts say there's growing awareness of the problem. The lack of information on the subject recently prompted the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention -- a nonprofit that sets standards used by the FDA -- to establish a Food Fraud Database. And a new study in the Journal of Food Science analyzed the top offenders identified by the database, including olive oil, milk and honey. "We're seeing similar trends in food to other items -- if it can be faked, it probably is," says Tara Steketee, the senior manager for brand protection at OpSec Security, an anti-counterfeiting consulting firm. "There are actually counterfeit tomatoes, believe it or not." (In that example, she says, garden-variety tomatoes get marketed as the more expensive heirloom ones.) The growing number of imported foods consumed by Americans makes it harder to identify the frauds, experts say. A recent FDA-commissioned Institute of Medicine study found the quantity of imported foods and drugs nearly tripled over the past 10 years. Currently, imports account for 85% of seafood, 39% of fruits and nuts and 18% of vegetables. That leads to great variety, but also increased risk from less rigorous food safety practices in other countries, says Clare Narrod, the risk analysis program manager for the University of Maryland's Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, who served on the committee preparing the Institute of Medicine study. Criminals may also re-route a problem product through other countries in an attempt to evade U.S. bans. Food is also one of the easier products to fake because the distinctions from the real deal are often subtle. "The biggest challenge with food products is that they're natural, and there's an infinite number of variation in natural products," says John Spink, associate director of the Anti-Counterfeiting and Product Protection Program at Michigan State University, who authored the new Journal of Food Science study. Criminals are counting on shoppers not tasting differences between wines, and not noticing that their supposedly wild salmon isn't quite as pink as it should be when cooked. As more cooks experiment with high-end olive oils, artisanal meats and heirloom produce, passing off a cheap ingredient as its fancier counterpart grows more profitable, too. Avoiding fakes comes down largely to being an informed shopper and buying from trustworthy sources. Branded products tend to have more supply-chain safeguards, says Narrod. "It's their reputation on the line, so they have things in place," she says. It can also help to buy products with shorter supply chains which tend to be local or minimally processed, Spink says. And if the taste of an item seems off, or you get sick, it's worth alerting both the store and the local public health department. Because they're ingested, fraudulent foods carry more significant health concerns than other fakes. Consumers with allergies could have a reaction, says Amy Kircher, associate director of the National Center for Food Protection and Defense. Some substituted items aren't meant for human consumption, and others contain toxic ingredients like lead or melamine. Here are eight foods researchers say shoppers may unwittingly buy fraudulent versions of. Olive Oil

Accounting for 16% of the database's recorded cases, olive oil is the food most subject to fraud, according to the Journal of Food Sciences study. In most cases, experts say, consumers are merely getting a bad deal -- regular olive oil instead of pricier extra virgin, say, or a less expensive variety from Greece instead of Italy as the label proclaims. But in rare cases, varieties of non-food-grade oil may be added in, posing a health risk, Steketee says. In one of the more famous cases, more than 600 people in Spain died in 1981 after consuming "olive oil" that was actually a non-food-grade rapeseed oil intended as an industrial lubricant. She suggests sticking to brands you know and sources you trust.

More from SmartMoney:

The Best Credit Cards of 2012

10 Things Seafood Restaurants Won’t Tell You

5 Ways Google Earns Money Off You

Milk

Adulterated milk is typically watered down and then laced with melamine, which increases the protein content to hide the dilution, Spink says. "Consumers may consume the product and may not be aware of the quality variation," he says. In fact, milk is the second most common ingredient subject to adulteration, at 14% of cases in the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention's Food Fraud Database. The 2008 Chinese milk scandal was the most high-profile incident, with the resulting outbreak killing six infants and sickening more than 300,000 consumers. Steketee says the problem is still more widespread abroad, with U.S. consumers needing to be more cautious about powdered milk and similar products of unknown origin.

Honey

The Journal of Food Sciences study pegged honey as a top fake, representing 7% of food fraud cases. Last year, Food Safety News tests also found that 75% of store honey doesn’t contain pollen. People are still buying a bee-made product, but all the pollen has been screened out, says Andrew Schneider, a food safety journalist who wrote the reports for Food Safety News. A lack of pollen makes it tough to determine its geographic origin -- and also means regulators don't recognize the product as honey, he says. Why the misdirection? Separate Food Safety News tests found a third of the faux honey imports from Asia were contaminated with lead and antibiotics. For the real deal, Schneider suggests buying from a local beekeeper. A National Honey Board spokesman says the group disputes the Food Safety News findings, and says regulations do allow for pollen to be filtered out as part of the removal of particles such as bee parts and other organic debris.

Fruit Juice

Fraudsters find it easy to dilute expensive juices without a notable change in taste or consistency, says Kircher. Orange juice represents 4% of cases in the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention's Food Fraud Database, and apple juice, 2%. Consumers buying one of those common juices might get more water for their money, while an expensive one like pomegranate may be cut with apple juice. Consumers should be especially careful to read labels and pick a trusted brand when buying into the latest super-fruit craze, she says. It takes time to build up supply of a newly hot fruit, so those products are more likely to be adulterated.

Baby Formula

Although not a top offender in the Food Fraud database, experts say baby formula poses considerable food fraud risk. Formula is one of the most common targets for organized retail theft, and criminals often tamper with the sell-by codes to move expired product, Spink says. Adulterated milk, which can make it into formula, also poses a concern here, Steketee says. Parents' best bet, they say, is to buy from a major retailer rather than less-monitored venues such as flea markets and online auctions. And don't buy any package that has a blurred-out expiration date or otherwise looks tampered with, she says.

Spices

There's ample fraud opportunity in expensive goods that are purchased in small quantities and used in small doses as it's unlikely one's using enough to notice something isn't quite right, Spink says. Saffron represents 5% of food fraud cases and vanilla extract, 2%. Turmeric, star anise, paprika and chili powder each account for another 1%. Some are dangerous swaps, others, a waste of money. Shoppers buying paprika may be getting the flavorless leftovers of spices that have already been processed for extracts. Chinese star anise, for example, may be substituted with toxic Japanese star anise. Experts suggest being cautious about buying from markets or bulk bins without knowing the spice's origin.

Alcohol

Just a few weeks ago, a New York wine dealer was arrested for allegedly trying to sell rare -- but counterfeit -- wines for $1.3 million. Collectively, wines, spirits and liquors represent just 2% of cases in the USPC's Food Fraud database. Most faux wines are just a cheaper vintage and a bad bargain, but adulterated spirits are potentially more dangerous, says Steketee. Fake vodkas in particular have made the news in recent months, with contaminants such as anti-freeze and other dangerous chemicals. Counterfeiters are likely to focus most of their attention on the packaging, so consumers should keep an eye out for logos and bottles that don't look quite right, she says.

Fish

"It's easy to sell a piece of fish as one species when in reality it's another species," says Kircher. Farmed fish also get advertised as more expensive wild versions. Sometimes, it gets even more creative than a simple mislabel. Scallops, for example, might actually be punched out circles from a whitefish fillet, she says. Faux fish represented the top fraud in the Journal of Food Sciences study of media and other public records, at 9% of cases. And some may be unhealthy. A recent Consumer Reports study included a "grouper" sample that was really tilefish, a species that contains enough mercury to make the FDA's list of foods that pregnant women and young children should avoid. Experts suggest buying whole fish when possible which are harder to fake.



Vegetables California Blend (50 cal), spinach (10 cal), Jalapenos OR Chipotle (~15 cal) -to spice it up and if I'm really hungy I'll add tuna or salmon in water (1 serving/60 cal) .  Plus my cup of coffee with a bit of milk - no sugar added. My delicious meal is under 170 calories ... it tastes great and gives an amazing feeling of fullness.



My favorite breakfast is super easy, low in calories, and high in nutrition. The best part is I make it Sunday night and don't have to worry all week. I spray a muffin pan with Pam and then I chop whatever veggies I have (broccoli, peppers, asparagus, zucchini, etc.) and put them in the bottom of each tin. I add some fat free or reduced fat grated cheese. An then fill them almost to the top with egg whites. Sprinkle with spices and bake at 350 for about 20 minutes or until they no longer jiggle.


Original Post by: mrspaim

My favorite breakfast is super easy, low in calories, and high in nutrition. The best part is I make it Sunday night and don't have to worry all week. I spray a muffin pan with Pam and then I chop whatever veggies I have (broccoli, peppers, asparagus, zucchini, etc.) and put them in the bottom of each tin. I add some fat free or reduced fat grated cheese. An then fill them almost to the top with egg whites. Sprinkle with spices and bake at 350 for about 20 minutes or until they no longer jiggle.

great idea!!! I have one piece of toast, put some sauteed veggies on it(zuccini, onions, spinach, whatever I have on hand).  Poach a couple of eggs or one egg and one egg white(extra egg goes to the animals) when the eggs are done I place them on the toast with veggies, sprinkle some cheese (shredded or parmesian, and enjoy!!



Original Post by: jimmyloram

You know, I feel like these "meals" are just TOO LOW in calories.  If you eat these tiny meals, you're going to be STARVING in about an hour!  

I learned that I need to have at least 300 to 400 calories per sitting.  If I do that about 5 times throughout my day, I'm coming in at 1500 to 2000 calories.  Plus, since I'm eating every few hours using the Half Meal Habit I'm NEVER hungry!  That's a big one for me...I HATE that feeling!

 


I have pretty much adopted this same idea, Eating everyfew hours of 'good' food, definately makes my calorie intake better, plus I don't feel like I overeat.  If I don't I end up overeating. not goodCry



this morning, made a bed of sauteed spinach, garlic and onion, seasoned with red pepper flakes, topped with fried egg white and a side of seedless black grapes ...

2 other favorites are: 1) oatmeal with wheat germ, fruit (apples, bananas or berries) with nuts and cinnamon and 2) whole grain toaster waffle topped with chunky peanut butter, bananas and honey ...

they are quick to fix and all are from articles on calorie count website or links from there ...



After trying just about everything listed here, I feel like I found a miracle.  It is an Herbalife shake.  It is a true meal replacement not just a shake to fill me up.  But with the addition of their protein powder I am getting enough protein to keep me full until lunch and that means a lot to me.  I can't restrict calories when I am hungry.  I have the shake for breakfast and lunch then eat a balanced dinner.  The shakes come in a lot of flavors and I use the vanilla with different fresh fruit that is in season so it is never boring. At less than 300 calories it works better than anything I have tried.  I love not getting hungry between meals.



I use sugar free syrup on my pancakes.  Only 35 calories per 1/4 cup.  It tastes different at first, but it's kind of like switching to diet soda.  Once you get used to it, the regular stuff starts to taste way too sweet.  They offer it at most restaurants I go to, and I keep a bottle at home.  I LOVE pancakes!



I really like eating whole wheat sandwich thins, toasted (110cal) for breakfast with organic jelly (30 cal). I usually combine that with a piece of fruit and full glass of water for a really good breakfast. It's delicious and it it's easy and quick to make. I usually toast the bread when I'm getting ready to leave for work or school. But it's also pretty low in calories and I usually feel full afterwards! I can't eat dairy so options like yogurt and such are not possible for me. But this is a great alternative!



Original Post by: exbiker_cj

These are great ideas for breakfast! I enjoyed 1/2 cup cottage cheese,with 1 tblsp flax seed and bran (same)and 1 pineapple slice chopped ...mmm then a small apple to finish ..oh yes,mixed tlbsp granola in there too...just trying to make breakfast a habit..look forward to reading more ideas.i make my own bread..what is spouted bread Rodney?


That's great, How you dropping your weight? What other things are you doing? I have been trying to lose weight for more than a year to only lose 5 pounds each time.



 protein shake: 40g protein, 4g carbs



My all-organic breakfast staple which I absolutely love:

oat bran

wheat bran

water

Microwave the above three for a little over a minute and then add almond milk for desired consistency. Garnish with chopped almonds, walnuts and a spoon of honey.



I found that drinking a warm cup of water before any meal makes you full faster . My heart healthy breakfast is a cup of instant oatmeal, I add to it about a cup of chopped dry fruits ( papaya, apples, pears, cranberries, blueberries, apricot) and a out five pieces of walnut, 2 tsp honey,1/2 tsp cinnamon, and some times a scoop of vanilla protein powder, then I cover fill the bowl with fat free milk and microwave for 2 minutes. I eat it with a cup of black tea with added FF milk to sweeten instead of adding sugar.


0% fat Greek yogurt and fresh fruit.  I like to sprinkle some cinnamon on top along with a small drizzle of honey. 



this sounds good! going to borrow it!



Original Post by: dianemar

Original Post by: jimmyloram

You know, I feel like these "meals" are just TOO LOW in calories.  If you eat these tiny meals, you're going to be STARVING in about an hour!  

I learned that I need to have at least 300 to 400 calories per sitting.  If I do that about 5 times throughout my day, I'm coming in at 1500 to 2000 calories.  Plus, since I'm eating every few hours using the Half Meal Habit I'm NEVER hungry!  That's a big one for me...I HATE that feeling!

 


I have pretty much adopted this same idea, Eating everyfew hours of 'good' food, definately makes my calorie intake better, plus I don't feel like I overeat.  If I don't I end up overeating. not goodCry


I know EXACTLY what you mean, dianemar!  But what has been great is when I do TRY to overeat, my body is so used to these small meals, my "binges" are a lot less damaging!  In other words, I can't cram as much food into my gullet, lol.  

The killer for me was TIME.  Who time to make a bunch of small meals?  That's why eating half my lunch at noon and the other half at 3pm (and the other half meal habit tips) have worked so well for me. 

Also, drinking a big ol' glass of water BEFORE I eat helps to keep me from falling back into eating like I used to.

Jim



Original Post by: fordmandan

Hi, My favorite low calorie breakfast is French toast made with 40 cal bread,Egg Beaters, and sugar free syrup or egg sandwich with 40 cal bread and Egg Beaters,FF cheese with onion and green pepper. Both good and low calorie.


Sure thing:

1 cup frozen blueberries

2 cups baby spinach

85g soft tofu

2T ground flax

1T blackstrap molasses (it has to be blackstrap, otherwise it doesnt have the same nutrient profile.

Whirr in a blender with water as required till "smooth".

 

It looks gross (its a browny green colour) but tastes pretty good. And best yet is pretty energizing. My husband has even noticed.



Lately my warm weather breakfast has been 3 hardboiled eggs mashed with one tablespoon mayonaisse, some mustard and one diced tomato for about 350 calories.  In the winter, I eat an egg sandwich on a thomas multigrain English muffin with cheddar cheese and green chiles for about the same.  If I am really cutting, I have an egg beater frittata with last night's leftover vegetables made in my little cast iron skillet and finished in the toaster oven.  To the horror of others, sometimes I eat green chile stew for breakfast.  What's the big deal?? They pour it on their breakfast burritos! :)  And speaking of those... one made with a low carb tortilla can be pretty indulgent without blowing the day.



My favorite breakfast: microwave 1/4 c quick oats, 1/2c sliced apples, cinnamon and 1/2 c water on 60% power for 4 minutes. Then add either 1/2 c yogurt or cottage cheese. Creamy and yummy!


This is great,so many new ideas!!thanks for the info about sprouted bread. too..



1 banana, 5 strawberries, dash of orange juice, couple of spoonfuls of fat free natural yoghurt whizz in the blender perfect smoothie!



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