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Calorie Count Blog

Debunking Metabolism Myths


By +Carolyn Richardson on Aug 29, 2012 10:00 AM in Healthy Eating

Your metabolism isn't broken never to be fixed. There are myths about metabolism that make it seem as though it's like a credit score. Weight loss misfortunes won't wreck your ability to lose weight for once and for all. Some think that after a few times of losing and gaining, it’s impossible to lose as much as before. Others feel their desk jobs make it too hard to burn enough calories to lose weight. While doubt and fear may play tricks with your mind, your body is up to losing weight in either situation if you put it to the test. These common myths about losing and gaining don’t line up with new research that points to the body's ability to do whatever you want it to.

Second Time Around

If you're on the second or third leg of your weight loss trip, you may think your first time was best, but you have just as good a chance at losing weight. A new study in the journal Metabolism studied over 400 post-menopausal women during a one-year weight loss intervention. All were both overweight and inactive, however a group within the cohort were labeled weight cyclers as they had lost or gained a significant amount of weight over the years. The moderate group cycled between 10 pounds, while the severe group cycled between 20. Compared to participants with steady weights, the weight cyclers weren't left in the weight loss dust. In fact, even though the weight cyclers were generally heavier and had worse metabolic profiles than the rest of the group, they were just as effective at all weight loss parameters, including pounds lost, improvement in insulin resistance, body composition and blood pressure. Their results show that you're not at a disadvantage if you've lost weight before. 

Don't Blame Your Desk Job

Another myth involves people's sedentary lifestyles. Some argue that if they had a more active lifestyle, they'd burn more calories naturally and weigh less. It's a reasonable argument given the long work hours and commutes many Americans endure, but it's just not true according to research published in PLoS one. Study author Herman Pontzer of Hunter College in New York and other researchers studied the daily intake of hunter-gatherers in northern Tanzania. The lifestyle isn't completely a caveman existence, but these traditional villages are always on the move. Their diets are also quite different, but surprisingly an assessment of their daily energy expenditure shows unexpected congruence with the typical American. They are virtually the same. After controlling for body size, their results show the foragers of Tanzania expend the same amount of calories each day as largely sedentary Westerners. What's more, the hunter-gatherers expended similar amounts of calories walking and resting as well. According to the study, their results suggest " human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences."

Beyond the Myths

That said, work with the metabolism you've got. If you want to lose, past attempts aren't holding you back. If you have a job that has you sitting all day, you're not at a disadvantage. A caloric deficit is all you need to lose weight. The two things that will slow your metabolism are not getting enough calories and not getting enough exercise. If you balance regular exercise with a healthy diet, you're primed to lose. 

 

Your thoughts...

How do you stay motivated after a setback in maintaining a healthy lifestyle? 



Comments


I have lost over 100 pounds since July 2011.  I have effectively done that, despite my fears of my metabolism.  I first began exercising daily, and then began counting calories in order to control my calorie intake.  I have desk job, that is demanding of hours at a computer and have never been athletic.  I am female and over 50.  By running a calorie deficit each week I am still consistently losing weight.  It is generally between .5 and 2.5 pounds per week.  I have 56 pounds left to lose.  I feel better than I have in many years and I am more active than I have been in many years.  I think I am a good examply of busting the metabolism myth, as your article indicates.



Good for you. I was not really overweight as a child; however, did manage to put on about 30 pounds during my Freshman year in college. I managed to lose the weight and actually got to the lowest part of my weight range. I kept it off for years than entered grad school. Say no more!

I am determined to lose over 300 pounds and have lost 63 to date. I am glad we can jump start our metabolism for so many times people use their metabolism or set point theory as excuses not to improve their weight and overall health. You are an inspiration and I wish you continued success as you lose the last 56 pounds. I know I can reach my goal as well, without surgery. I am determined! 



I have lost and gained weight (60-80 lbs ranges) several times and also have a desk job.  Since July 2010, I have lost and maintained a 100 lb weight loss.  I have done it with exercise, nutrition, and support.  Now, I help others do the same thing.  Don't let your past weight loss failures or your current sedentary lifestyle be an excuse to NOT become the real you!



Comment Removed

I lost 12st five years ago ,I put 9st back on again  .I got an under active thyroid I am on 150 micrograms a day  and find it very hard to loose weight .



I stay motivated by not expecting the weightloss to happen over night.  Honestly, back when ephedra was available in high amounts, I lost 80lbs in 8 months and my goal has been to get back to that weight.  I was also 10 years younger during this time.  Slowly I gained back the weight at the rate of about 10 lbs per year once ephedra was limited in weightloss products.  Now I find myself back to needing to lose 50 lbs.  Last November, I started eating heatlhy, significantly reduced the frequency in which I eat at restaurants, started an exercise program, and taking a multi-vitamin.  After just a couple of months, I was very discouraged that I had only lost a few inches and 5lbs.  I was extremely upset because I wanted instant results.  I didn't give up though and I stopped getting on that scale everyday because the numbers game just killed my spirit.  My clothes were fitting looser and I felt better, that is what mattered and that is what I had to make matter so I didn't lose my drive.

Since November, I have lost 18 lbs and two jean sizes.  That is an average weightloss of just under 2lbs/mo.  I am patient with myself and keep reminding myself that I am doing this without ANY weightloss drug, dieting, or damage to my body.  Over time, the weightloss will continue and the healthy habits will be engrained into my lifestyle.  If nothing else is gained from this article, it should be that you can't give up on your metabolism or your body.  Don't revert back to old habits because you're not seeing results fast enough.  Don't be discouraged because you've hit a plateau.  Even if you've maintained for months and are frustrated, remember that you're better off now than going back to your old habits...even if you stay the size you're at right now, you wont get heavier and you'll be healthy if you keep eating right and keep moving your body regulary in some sort of exercise program.

Believe in yourself....love yourself....and keep on going, YOU CAN DO IT!



I Just like to add that when reading research don't take it as is.  As a researcher I find that some people want to get their work published and dont' look at the flaws.  You have to look at the pool of people that were compared and how big that pool was.  It could be that at the time period when the research was being conducted lifestyles of certain people changed momentarily and also season adds to the activity level, as well as diet.  A lot of the people in the developing countries get most of their nutrients from vegetables, legumes, adn fruits. meats not as easily accessible to everyone, unlike the americans.

 

anyways, I am sure there's some truth to it, but in my  opinion desk job does slow down energy burning compare to a more active life style.

 



I have to agree with joeeatwork on that section. I read over it three times and still came to the conclusiont that it made no sense whatsoever to claim basically two totally different lifestyles, one active, one sedentary had the same metabolic rates. Hello, then why state later to exercise lol!

I have a difficult time exercising due to a medical condition that limits the amount of areobic energy I can expend. I have lost about 35-40 lbs( about6 months) so far but it has really slowed down now to .5 lbs or less a week for the past month- month and a half. I've tried the eating a few more calories for a day or two( still staying under or equal to the suggested amount) but hasn't done any good. I seriously think the only thing that is goind to speed it back up is more exercise but I can't do that so guess I am going to have to be happy with the tiny bit a month and stay off the scale since that is just discouraging me.



I lost over 60lbs about 7 years ago. exercising and eating right.  But I stopped smoking 7 years ago and gained some back.  Now I am about 25 pounds overweight and feel like I am banging my head against the wall! 

I have lumps on my thyroid but tests have shown my levels normal!!  I think that my body reluctance to lose weight is a couple of things: a compromised thyroid, getting older and maybe not eating enough or not eating enough protien and fat, as well as an exercise regime that maybe a little too intense ( I have done turbo fire, insanity, and am now on P90X). Is there any research out there on people who have lost weight, kept up a healthy life style and yet seem to experiencing weight gain.  FYI I am 47 years old and according to my ob/gyn- hormone levels are normal as well. 



I'm curious as to how the 'plateau' fits in with the metabolism theory.  Any thoughts?

I hit a 'plateau' about every 10 lbs.  I will hit the weight loss calculation just right, lose 10 lbs then stall out.  Same amount of calories and exercise. Then I just know I have about an 12 to 18 month window of time where my weight will stay within 3 lbs of my current 'low'.   It's been 4 years +, 30 lbs down and this is the pattern- without fail.  I may drop down a bit but will bounce back up.  Short of drastic measures with calorie deficit or exercise, I have to just wait it out and be patient.  If I push it then the bounce back is closer to 9 lbs.  So I just trudge along.  Then, poof, weight loss resumes at the same calorie/exercise ratio.  Go figure.



Original Post by: annschmech

I'm curious as to how the 'plateau' fits in with the metabolism theory.  Any thoughts?

I hit a 'plateau' about every 10 lbs.  I will hit the weight loss calculation just right, lose 10 lbs then stall out.  Same amount of calories and exercise. Then I just know I have about an 12 to 18 month window of time where my weight will stay within 3 lbs of my current 'low'.   It's been 4 years +, 30 lbs down and this is the pattern- without fail.  I may drop down a bit but will bounce back up.  Short of drastic measures with calorie deficit or exercise, I have to just wait it out and be patient.  If I push it then the bounce back is closer to 9 lbs.  So I just trudge along.  Then, poof, weight loss resumes at the same calorie/exercise ratio.  Go figure.


This works both directions for me too.  If I am in the 'plateau' then I don't gain weight as easily either, I drop back down to 'the window'.  I just hit and hold.  So it's not all bad, just kind of odd.



Original Post by: erak223067037

Good for you. I was not really overweight as a child; however, did manage to put on about 30 pounds during my Freshman year in college. I managed to lose the weight and actually got to the lowest part of my weight range. I kept it off for years than entered grad school. Say no more!

I am determined to lose over 300 pounds and have lost 63 to date. I am glad we can jump start our metabolism for so many times people use their metabolism or set point theory as excuses not to improve their weight and overall health. You are an inspiration and I wish you continued success as you lose the last 56 pounds. I know I can reach my goal as well, without surgery. I am determined! 


Ah!  You just laid out how EVERYONE can start losing weight!  It's that negative caloric intake.  Adding exercise will help the process.  And hydrating is crucial too.  Do you?  

Anyway, I wish more people would do what you do and stay off these crazy fad diets.   By eating less through half meals, I lost the weight I wanted and it's staying off.  I don't count calories (no time for that!) but I do eat a lot less than I used to.  

Jim

http://halfmealhabit.com/



Thank you for posting - this is exactly what I needed to hear this morning.



That was very interesting. I am exercising (running, pilates) and having a hard time losing the weight so I thought perhaps it was my age (42). Thanks for this article; I shall redouble my efforts to drink more water and wait half an hour to see if I am really hungry before going straight to the fridge... Wink



Original Post by: marychristinaconroy

I lost 12st five years ago ,I put 9st back on again  .I got an under active thyroid I am on 150 micrograms a day  and find it very hard to loose weight .


Having a thyroid condition can cause all-kinds of issues with metabolism, body temperature, digestions, and a whole host of other problems.  That said, I am also hypo-thyroid.  I work very hard to keep my thyroid dosage correct, with lethargy and weight gain on the low side, and extreme anxiety and increased potential for cardiac arrhythmias on the high side (and a very narrow range between the two I sheepishly call "normal").  Keep in mind that there actually is a very wide range of thyroid hormone (Free T3 or Free T4) that falls within the "acceptable range" for most lab tests, and determining the proper dosage cannot entirely be done via lab test alone.  Also, make sure you are tested regularly (3-6 months is typical, with longer times for stable conditions).

You should speak with your doctor about all your symptoms and see if increasing the amount of thyroid hormone might be warranted.  Thyroid issues can make it very hard to loose weight, but it does not make it impossible.



I try to maintain a healthy lifestyle. If I miss a workout or eat badly, it's one small indiscretion and doesn't mean that I have to throw in the towel days or weeks on end for the screw up. Eating a donut in the morning doesn't mean the whole day is shot and now I can all the junk I want. I remind myself that eating a donut wasn't good but I get right back on track for the rest of the day. The same thing with exercise. If I miss a workout, I get right back in as quickly as possible. That way it's not even harder to get back on track. And above all, I always say Life Is a Marathon Not a Sprint.

Hats off to you CindySharp!! Losing 100 lbs. That is so impressive!!



Original Post by: jan10333

I have to agree with joeeatwork on that section. I read over it three times and still came to the conclusiont that it made no sense whatsoever to claim basically two totally different lifestyles, one active, one sedentary had the same metabolic rates. Hello, then why state later to exercise lol!

I have a difficult time exercising due to a medical condition that limits the amount of areobic energy I can expend. I have lost about 35-40 lbs( about6 months) so far but it has really slowed down now to .5 lbs or less a week for the past month- month and a half. I've tried the eating a few more calories for a day or two( still staying under or equal to the suggested amount) but hasn't done any good. I seriously think the only thing that is goind to speed it back up is more exercise but I can't do that so guess I am going to have to be happy with the tiny bit a month and stay off the scale since that is just discouraging me.


The Rosedale Diet, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, jackkruse.com, and Body by Science are all excellent resources for figuring out a healthy lifestyle and exercise program.

Can you do weight training at all?  High intensity weight training builds Aerobic capacity.  Maybe you could start slow?

http://jackkruse.com/brain-gut-6-epi-paleo-rx/

This blog post has an excellent run down of great nutrition. 

Follow that post along with Body By Science workout methodology.  :)

Very good stuff...still need to find a gym myself looking forward to getting buff.  I've lost 46 pounds so far and counting.



Original Post by: sjus625198426

I lost over 60lbs about 7 years ago. exercising and eating right.  But I stopped smoking 7 years ago and gained some back.  Now I am about 25 pounds overweight and feel like I am banging my head against the wall! 

I have lumps on my thyroid but tests have shown my levels normal!!  I think that my body reluctance to lose weight is a couple of things: a compromised thyroid, getting older and maybe not eating enough or not eating enough protien and fat, as well as an exercise regime that maybe a little too intense ( I have done turbo fire, insanity, and am now on P90X). Is there any research out there on people who have lost weight, kept up a healthy life style and yet seem to experiencing weight gain.  FYI I am 47 years old and according to my ob/gyn- hormone levels are normal as well. 


See if you can find someone near you on this list.

http://paleophysiciansnetwork.com/

Great list for holistic health practitioners.



I have decided I really need a weight loss coach, I need to lose around 140 lbs.  any ideas?

 



Original Post by: dianemar

I have decided I really need a weight loss coach, I need to lose around 140 lbs.  any ideas?

 


Read the books I mentioned and blog posts?  http://paleophysiciansnetwork.com/ for a doctor :)



Interesting read on how metabolism/energy expenditure of a sedentary lifestyle is nearly the same as an active lifestyle.

It doesn't really surprise me tho, 15 years ago I volunteered at a hospital's call button station, as I sat on my bum all day long waiting for patient calls I watched the nurses at work being busy, scurrying, lifting, bending, caring for patients and on their feet all day long. For as hard as they hustled I was taken aback by how overweight many of them were. Sure I was overweight too, but it was to be expected right, I sit on my bum all day. Fast-forward years later, I would be a lab scientist on my feet all day, walking from lab to lab, building to building, carrying reagents, etc. Hustling myself and I saw no weight loss from it, I then switched to a desk job, and you know what, there was no weight gain either.

 

I would say there are extreme ends of sedentary and active lifestyles, and most of us probably fit somewhere in between that range. I guess those that fit in the middle of the range don't notice a significant weight impact until you hit the extreme end points like being a daily construction worker or being bed ridden?

 

Also, I am curious to know more on why the Tanzanians burned the same amount of energy while at rest and while walking. I think more research and explanation into this area is needed. For example is it because:

• They’re super fit and their hearts are so healthy that when they walked there was no stress to the heart or system and therefore no energy deficit? And should we be trying to strive for this type of fitness?

• They may look fit and be active but are really malnourished and therefore not burning energy at an optimal level for an activity which would then ultimately change the total energy expenditure to be lower and therefore similar to a sedentary person’s total expenditure.

• They’re experiencing some type of plateau effect because their bodies have learned to conserve energy for a particular consistent activity, such as walking. This may explain why it doesn’t make sense that energy expenditures that should logically make a difference don’t when comparing groups of active and sedentary. Eventually the individual expenditure of a consistent activity shifts because of daily practice. So eventually walking an hour or two every day doesn’t work for exercise because over time it’s like that person is just resting and their bodies have adjusted for it?

 

Whatever the case, being active is still more healthy than sedentary regardless of energy expenditure.



Calories in Calories out is flawed for many reasons that's why they find these things.  Calories in Calories out is strictly true but not in the simplistic way people think.  There are many factors that change the in and out from what you would expect.

Metabolism slowing down or speeding up due to various effects that aren't factored.  The fact that no calorie count is completely accurate.  There are too many variables.  Its why those using a simplistic calories in calories out thought process fail sometimes.  They don't know all of the factors which makes it hard to actually get results.

There are plenty of details on why CICO is flawed in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living/Performance and in Body by Science.  They also include in Body by Science a study that shows that obese people doing certain kinds of steady state cardio have reduced metabolism. 



Comment Removed

Original Post by: shaedreams

I stay motivated by not expecting the weightloss to happen over night.  Honestly, back when ephedra was available in high amounts, I lost 80lbs in 8 months and my goal has been to get back to that weight.  I was also 10 years younger during this time.  Slowly I gained back the weight at the rate of about 10 lbs per year once ephedra was limited in weightloss products.  Now I find myself back to needing to lose 50 lbs.  Last November, I started eating heatlhy, significantly reduced the frequency in which I eat at restaurants, started an exercise program, and taking a multi-vitamin.  After just a couple of months, I was very discouraged that I had only lost a few inches and 5lbs.  I was extremely upset because I wanted instant results.  I didn't give up though and I stopped getting on that scale everyday because the numbers game just killed my spirit.  My clothes were fitting looser and I felt better, that is what mattered and that is what I had to make matter so I didn't lose my drive.

Since November, I have lost 18 lbs and two jean sizes.  That is an average weightloss of just under 2lbs/mo.  I am patient with myself and keep reminding myself that I am doing this without ANY weightloss drug, dieting, or damage to my body.  Over time, the weightloss will continue and the healthy habits will be engrained into my lifestyle.  If nothing else is gained from this article, it should be that you can't give up on your metabolism or your body.  Don't revert back to old habits because you're not seeing results fast enough.  Don't be discouraged because you've hit a plateau.  Even if you've maintained for months and are frustrated, remember that you're better off now than going back to your old habits...even if you stay the size you're at right now, you wont get heavier and you'll be healthy if you keep eating right and keep moving your body regulary in some sort of exercise program.

Believe in yourself....love yourself....and keep on going, YOU CAN DO IT!


shaedreams - -Your post is hands down the best I have ever read on Calorie Count. The insight and the spot on analysis you make here of the weight loss process should be published and marketed in every weight loss clinic and book ever written.  GOD BLESS YOU for making my day with so much clarity, perception, and inspiration.  You may never realize how many people you have helped with your contribution here.



Original Post by: beluomo

Original Post by: shaedreams

I stay motivated by not expecting the weightloss to happen over night.  Honestly, back when ephedra was available in high amounts, I lost 80lbs in 8 months and my goal has been to get back to that weight.  I was also 10 years younger during this time.  Slowly I gained back the weight at the rate of about 10 lbs per year once ephedra was limited in weightloss products.  Now I find myself back to needing to lose 50 lbs.  Last November, I started eating heatlhy, significantly reduced the frequency in which I eat at restaurants, started an exercise program, and taking a multi-vitamin.  After just a couple of months, I was very discouraged that I had only lost a few inches and 5lbs.  I was extremely upset because I wanted instant results.  I didn't give up though and I stopped getting on that scale everyday because the numbers game just killed my spirit.  My clothes were fitting looser and I felt better, that is what mattered and that is what I had to make matter so I didn't lose my drive.

Since November, I have lost 18 lbs and two jean sizes.  That is an average weightloss of just under 2lbs/mo.  I am patient with myself and keep reminding myself that I am doing this without ANY weightloss drug, dieting, or damage to my body.  Over time, the weightloss will continue and the healthy habits will be engrained into my lifestyle.  If nothing else is gained from this article, it should be that you can't give up on your metabolism or your body.  Don't revert back to old habits because you're not seeing results fast enough.  Don't be discouraged because you've hit a plateau.  Even if you've maintained for months and are frustrated, remember that you're better off now than going back to your old habits...even if you stay the size you're at right now, you wont get heavier and you'll be healthy if you keep eating right and keep moving your body regulary in some sort of exercise program.

Believe in yourself....love yourself....and keep on going, YOU CAN DO IT!


shaedreams - -Your post is hands down the best I have ever read on Calorie Count. The insight and the spot on analysis you make here of the weight loss process should be published and marketed in every weight loss clinic and book ever written.  GOD BLESS YOU for making my day with so much clarity, perception, and inspiration.  You may never realize how many people you have helped with your contribution here.


As joyce meyers would say, just do the same thing, over and over and over.  I get discouraged the the first 'over'. It is probably the continueing that brings success regardless of first results.



Don't get discouraged. You may need to adjust your calorie intake lower because with your new lower weight you are not burning as many calories during the day. The lower your weight the fewer calories you burn. Recalculate thru calorie.com and use the new number for your calorie goal.


Original Post by: raiken3712

Original Post by: jan10333

I have to agree with joeeatwork on that section. I read over it three times and still came to the conclusiont that it made no sense whatsoever to claim basically two totally different lifestyles, one active, one sedentary had the same metabolic rates. Hello, then why state later to exercise lol!

I have a difficult time exercising due to a medical condition that limits the amount of areobic energy I can expend. I have lost about 35-40 lbs( about6 months) so far but it has really slowed down now to .5 lbs or less a week for the past month- month and a half. I've tried the eating a few more calories for a day or two( still staying under or equal to the suggested amount) but hasn't done any good. I seriously think the only thing that is goind to speed it back up is more exercise but I can't do that so guess I am going to have to be happy with the tiny bit a month and stay off the scale since that is just discouraging me.


The Rosedale Diet, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, jackkruse.com, and Body by Science are all excellent resources for figuring out a healthy lifestyle and exercise program.

Can you do weight training at all?  High intensity weight training builds Aerobic capacity.  Maybe you could start slow?

http://jackkruse.com/brain-gut-6-epi-paleo-rx/

This blog post has an excellent run down of great nutrition. 

Follow that post along with Body By Science workout methodology.  :)

Very good stuff...still need to find a gym myself looking forward to getting buff.  I've lost 46 pounds so far and counting.


no I have an illness in which my body actually doesn't product energy normally so once it's gone, it stays gone for a lot longer than most people's. If I exercise to the point of using all my anerobic energy, once the areobic kicks in and is gone, it's literally days( has been years rather than days or months if I have really overdone it) till I am back to my "normal" energy (which is still way below what it was before I got sick, I normally have about 2 hrs a day for everything, including basic hygeine, if I go past that more than a day or two in a row or have a cold or something that takes more energy than normally,  I have a relapse of my other symptoms). So if anything, that would make it worse and even harder to exercise...a real catch 22 lol. I have taken a number of nutrition courses so I know what to eat etc. I don't use fad diets as they have a tendency to put my body farther off balance. I just eat mostly veggies/fruit, some protein and some( limited) starch. 'it's been 25 years of trial and error but eating this way I feel healthier , it's just hard to lose weight when I am limited severely by how much energy I can expend



Original Post by: shaedreams

I stay motivated by not expecting the weightloss to happen over night.  Honestly, back when ephedra was available in high amounts, I lost 80lbs in 8 months and my goal has been to get back to that weight.  I was also 10 years younger during this time.  Slowly I gained back the weight at the rate of about 10 lbs per year once ephedra was limited in weightloss products.  Now I find myself back to needing to lose 50 lbs.  Last November, I started eating heatlhy, significantly reduced the frequency in which I eat at restaurants, started an exercise program, and taking a multi-vitamin.  After just a couple of months, I was very discouraged that I had only lost a few inches and 5lbs.  I was extremely upset because I wanted instant results.  I didn't give up though and I stopped getting on that scale everyday because the numbers game just killed my spirit.  My clothes were fitting looser and I felt better, that is what mattered and that is what I had to make matter so I didn't lose my drive.

Since November, I have lost 18 lbs and two jean sizes.  That is an average weightloss of just under 2lbs/mo.  I am patient with myself and keep reminding myself that I am doing this without ANY weightloss drug, dieting, or damage to my body.  Over time, the weightloss will continue and the healthy habits will be engrained into my lifestyle.  If nothing else is gained from this article, it should be that you can't give up on your metabolism or your body.  Don't revert back to old habits because you're not seeing results fast enough.  Don't be discouraged because you've hit a plateau.  Even if you've maintained for months and are frustrated, remember that you're better off now than going back to your old habits...even if you stay the size you're at right now, you wont get heavier and you'll be healthy if you keep eating right and keep moving your body regulary in some sort of exercise program.

Believe in yourself....love yourself....and keep on going, YOU CAN DO IT!


Thank you for this!  I started using Calorie Count in late July, and I'm struggling to see results on the scale.  However, I feel great and I can tell that a couple of pairs of pants that were a little bit tight are now fitting better.  It's hard not to get discouraged though, particularly when I dropped 2 pounds the first week and now it is all back!  Some of it must be muscle I guess, if my clothes aren't as tight.  But I appreciate hearing about your "slow, steady and sensible" approach to weight loss!  This is such a great site for keeping my motivation up.



Original Post by: jan10333

Original Post by: raiken3712

Original Post by: jan10333

I have to agree with joeeatwork on that section. I read over it three times and still came to the conclusiont that it made no sense whatsoever to claim basically two totally different lifestyles, one active, one sedentary had the same metabolic rates. Hello, then why state later to exercise lol!

I have a difficult time exercising due to a medical condition that limits the amount of areobic energy I can expend. I have lost about 35-40 lbs( about6 months) so far but it has really slowed down now to .5 lbs or less a week for the past month- month and a half. I've tried the eating a few more calories for a day or two( still staying under or equal to the suggested amount) but hasn't done any good. I seriously think the only thing that is goind to speed it back up is more exercise but I can't do that so guess I am going to have to be happy with the tiny bit a month and stay off the scale since that is just discouraging me.


The Rosedale Diet, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, jackkruse.com, and Body by Science are all excellent resources for figuring out a healthy lifestyle and exercise program.

Can you do weight training at all?  High intensity weight training builds Aerobic capacity.  Maybe you could start slow?

http://jackkruse.com/brain-gut-6-epi-paleo-rx/

This blog post has an excellent run down of great nutrition. 

Follow that post along with Body By Science workout methodology.  :)

Very good stuff...still need to find a gym myself looking forward to getting buff.  I've lost 46 pounds so far and counting.


no I have an illness in which my body actually doesn't product energy normally so once it's gone, it stays gone for a lot longer than most people's. If I exercise to the point of using all my anerobic energy, once the areobic kicks in and is gone, it's literally days( has been years rather than days or months if I have really overdone it) till I am back to my "normal" energy (which is still way below what it was before I got sick, I normally have about 2 hrs a day for everything, including basic hygeine, if I go past that more than a day or two in a row or have a cold or something that takes more energy than normally,  I have a relapse of my other symptoms). So if anything, that would make it worse and even harder to exercise...a real catch 22 lol. I have taken a number of nutrition courses so I know what to eat etc. I don't use fad diets as they have a tendency to put my body farther off balance. I just eat mostly veggies/fruit, some protein and some( limited) starch. 'it's been 25 years of trial and error but eating this way I feel healthier , it's just hard to lose weight when I am limited severely by how much energy I can expend


Hmmm you have a rather interesting situation than.  What kind of doctor are you seeing?  If you can

http://paleophysiciansnetwork.com/

See if you can find a doctor on this list when its available.  Last I checked the page was down.  I really hope you aren't assuming The Rosedale Diet is a fad diet....just because its in a book doesn't automatically make it a fad....every diet has its own proponents and books.

No guarantees that any doctor will have insight about your condition but maybe someone might be able to help more.  You can't know without trying.



I am not sure I understand why people are all shocked by this Hazda Hunter Gatherer thing.  Read the abstract study - all it is saying that IF a Hazda hunter gatherer has a similar weight to me, then calorie expenditure for that hunter gatherer and I are the same.  I burn 500 calories and hour jogging - so does she.  I burn 8 calories sitting on my bum and so does she.

Really this shouldn't be shocking since science has already shown that all that muscley stuff is more efficient than fat, but really makes very little difference to the big picture that is our metabolism because there is a LOT MORE INVOLVED than muscle and fat.

SO there is really no reason to believe that a predominantly sedentary lifestyle means that you burn LESS calories at SPECIFIC activity levels.  When the desk jockey runs he burns the same amount of calories as the runner (if they are the same weight)

The advantage to being healthy is that you can run further and faster and lift more weight than the desk jockey and can do it easier than he or she can.< it really is that simple.  There is no magic healthy thing that turns us into calorie burning machines - we have to go out and BE calorie burning machines. If you can't run a mile without falling over and panting due to your weight or health level, well I guess it will be a lot harder and you will burn less calories because you are not capable of being active.

 

 



I stay motivated after a setback by first taking a break from the "calorie deficit." In other words, I step back for a week or two from "trying" to lose weight and just continue to workout and eat healthy. Then, I kick-it up by tracking my food intake (calories) and working out with more intensity. Working out keeps me motivated because I feel so great (e.g. provides energy & reduces stress) & it shapes and defines my body as the fat melts off. Plus, eating healthfully provides me the fuel for my calorie-burning workouts.

I would love to help motivate YOU too!! Email me if you'd like some individualized support: wilsonpugs@yahoo.com



Great principle eat less and/or exercise more. Simple formula right?

Well I am disabled and exercising more isn't a great option. I do what I can. I have been trying the 1250 Kcal that the website reccomended. My MD told me to eat more as my BS were too low, And I was weight maintaining at 160, not loosing. [I am 5'3"], my goal is 150.

So it isn't quite as simple as this article suggests.



If you don't like the eat less move more paradigm than ditch it.

http://jackkruse.com/jacks-blog/page/22/

Read posts 1-5, 13, 14, 16

http://jackkruse.com/brain-gut-6-epi-paleo-rx/

Use this food list as close as possible.

http://jackkruse.com/cold-thermogenesis-epi-paleo-rx-at-the- london-olympic-games/

Check this out for inspiration.  She used Epi-Paleo to great success.



It's not entirely about the "deficit." The type or "quality" of calories matters. If you're having low blood sugar issues, perhaps adjusting the foods, such as adding more protein and consuming less carbs, will provide better results than adjusting the number of calories. For individual guidance, feel free to email me at: wilsonpugs@yahoo.com

 



After a setback in my healthy lifestyle, I find motivation to get back on track in how crappy an unhealthy lifestyle makes me feel. When I'm sedentary and eating badly, my whole body aches, my digestion is a nightmare, I can't sleep, I have no energy, and my self-esteem plummets. Crappy food and inactivity are intolerable for me; I love healthy food and exercise too much to deprive myself of them!



Thank you for this information. There are a lot of assumptions about weight loss/exercise.

One of the myths? I have found not true for myself is that after menopause women put on weight.

I have lost weight through calorie restriction since menopause. Yet I have friends who blame their weight gain on going through menopause.



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