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Calorie Count Blog

Dietitian Vs Nutritionist


By +Rachel Berman on Mar 14, 2012 10:00 AM in Dieting & You

By Rachel Berman RD, Director of Nutrition, Calorie Count

I’m often asked: What is the difference between a dietitian and a nutritionist? It’s a question I love to hear because it usually means people are looking to get serious about their health with expert advice. Since today, March 14th, is National Registered Dietitian Day and we just launched our Premium Services offering dietitian support, it is a perfect time to answer that question for you. 

What is a Registered Dietitian (RD)?  

Registered dietitians are part detective and part counselor.  They look for clues in your current eating and exercise habits that may excel or hinder your healthy eating goals.  They also rely upon their extensive nutritional sciences background to create a customized program for you.  This can include meal plans, with specific calorie levels, nutrient goals, and exercise.  The best part about seeing a dietitian is that they help you take control of your own health.  

The traditional job of an RD is to work as part of a medical team for disease treatment and prevention.  However, a growing number of RDs are now working in the food and nutrition industry as well as business, journalism, sports nutrition, corporate wellness programs and other non-traditional work settings.  

Is a Nutritionist the same thing as a Registered Dietitian? 

While many RDs may call themselves nutritionist, not all nutritionists are RDs. An RD credential is granted only after the individual has completed certain requirements including at least a bachelor’s degree, a supervised practice program, and a registration examination. They also have to fulfill continuing education requirements to qualify for recertification (and stay current on the latest nutrition trends and news!). In some states there are licensure laws, which define the range of practice for a nutritionist. However, in other states there may be no regulation, giving anyone who wants to set up shop and call him or herself a nutrition professional the go ahead.   

When Should I see a Registered Dietitian?  

From the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

  1. You have diabetes, cardiovascular problems or high blood pressure.  An RD can serve as an integral part of your health-care team by helping you safely change your eating plan without compromising taste or nutrition.

  2. You are thinking of having or have had gastric bypass surgery.  Since your stomach can only manage small servings, it’s a challenge to get the right amount of nutrients in your body.  An RD will work with you and your physician to develop an eating plan for your new needs.  

  3. You have digestive problems.  A registered dietitian will work with your physician to help fine-tune your diet so you are not aggravating your condition with fried foods, too much caffeine, or carbonation.  

  4. You’re pregnant or trying to get pregnant.  A registered dietitian can help make sure you get nutrients like folate, especially during the first three months of pregnancy, lowering your newborn’s risk for neural tube or spinal cord defects.  

  5. You need guidance and confidence for breastfeeding your baby.  A registered dietitian can help make sure you’re getting enough iron, vitamin D, fluoride and B vitamins for you and your little one.    

  6. Your teenager has issues with food and eating healthfully.  A registered dietitian can assist with eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and overweight issues.  

  7. You need to gain or lose weight.   A registered dietitian can suggest additional calorie sources for healthy weight gain or a restricted-calorie activity for weight loss while still eating all your favorite foods.   

  8. You’re caring for an aging parent.  A registered dietitian can help with food or drug interaction, proper hydration, special diets for hypertension and changing taste buds as you age.    

  9. You want to eat smarter.  A registered dietitian can help you sort through misinformation; learn how to read labels at the supermarket; discover that  healthy cooking is inexpensive, learn how to eat out without ruining your eating plan and how to resist workplace temptations.  

  10. You want to improve your performance in sports.  A registered dietitian can help you set goals to achieve results—whether your running a marathon, skiing or jogging with your dog.  

If you need expert advice but cannot afford to see an RD in person, take a look at the packages we have to offer with our new services. 

Your thoughts...

Would you consider seeing an RD? If you already have, how did they help you?



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Comments


Good promotion for RDs.



After a lifetime of fighting my weight my doctor suggested I see a Registered Dietician. She looked at what I was eating and what barriers I had to eating more healthfully (poor hand strength that makes it difficult to prepare fruit and veg).

Together we worked out a plan and along with an exercise regime I have  lost 30pounds.  

Now we are working together to maintain the weight loss and to 'power eat' to maximize my health.

Consulting a registered dietician was the best thing I ever did to fight my weight problems. I highly recommend it to anyone trying to lose weight permanently. 

ps: if you have a diagnosis of Obesity many insurance plans now cover visits to Registered Dieticians . Call your plan and find out.

 



Good on the Dieticians!

Thought I should add that in the UK at least not only is dietician a protected term but nutritionist is becoming more of a protected term too. To be a nutritionist you need to have been on an accredited nutrition course in the UK.

Nutritional Therapists can be anyone's grandmother.



Original Post by: balm

Good on the Dieticians!

Thought I should add that in the UK at least not only is dietician a protected term but nutritionist is becoming more of a protected term too. To be a nutritionist you need to have been on an accredited nutrition course in the UK.

Nutritional Therapists can be anyone's grandmother.


Interesting, that is very good to know. Thank you for sharing!



I actually have an appointment to go see one in a couple weeks! I'm really excited! My university offers RD services for just $5 for an hour session. I basically just want to take advantage of such a great deal while I can. I am at a healthy weight, but I want to get some nutrition questions answered by someone who has a degree in dietetics rather than finding misinformation on forums on the Internet.



Ive got NO time for dieticians.... i had one tell me i was over reacting that my son had food allergies... so i told her if he became hyperactive she could look after him .....and she told me not to be so stupid .......She reckoned hyperactivity DIDNOT exist and that FOOD ALERGIES DOES NOT EXIST...people like her should NOT be a dietician if she does NOT know the facts. Thid dietician even works on childrens wards in a hospital... so she could even let a child die from a peanut allergy or something like that...Its dispicable

my son is 24 this year and we have to keep a diary for him so he knows what he cant eat



I'm with Hijuju... I've never met a nutritionally informed RD. It seems they can show results to hardcore cases where ANY change could be better but they don't seem to learn anything about real Health. You can find RD's in all hospitals. I have no idea what these RD's are thinking. I can give several examples but here is one.

My Aunt (81 yrs. old) is about 5'2" and 180+. She is diabetic. She
was in the hospital for her sugar being out of control. They were still having
trouble in the hospital getting it consistently under control. They weren’t
looking at what they were feeding her!! Her dinner consisted of mashed potatoes, 2-white flour rolls, boiled to death green beans (the best part of the dinner), and red meat with a ton of gravy on it. Thinking it better for her, they of course gave her several tubs of margarine in lieu of butter. My God... how
backward is all that! ALL her meals were like that. Their answer... treat the
symptom... more insulin more frequently, or new script (more expensive). They
tell her to stay away from sugar, cakes, and cookies... and then give her Tapioca for dessert!! White rice and sugar!!

Most hospitals are death traps. Take responsibility for your own health. Eat smart, eat less, and exercise. MANY excellent health resources on the web to help you pick whole foods that will heal you. Discipline and focus is the problem for most. Watch Dr. Oz each afternoon on TV. He'll get you focused.





I live in Canada and had a REALLY bad experience with a dietician. I had so much hope for one. I had been on a waiting list for FOREVER. When I finally got the call for the appointment she weighed me, told me how fat I was told me how much I should weigh, BMI which tells me I should be 165, with my bone mass and height, that would be way too small, 190 would be better for me. She passed me the Canadian food guide told me to follow it and sent me on my way. Pretty much told me not to eat more than 2 tbsp of oil a day, no butter , 8 oz of meat per meal, lots of fruits and veggies and whole grains and 1200 calories a day and no meal examples to follow.  I was about 340 lbs when she told me this. That is NOT enough calories for my body to function in a day, let alone if I want to exercise.



Original Post by: tierney7

I'm with Hijuju... I've never met a nutritionally informed RD. It seems they can show results to hardcore cases where ANY change could be better but they don't seem to learn anything about real Health. You can find RD's in all hospitals. I have no idea what these RD's are thinking. I can give several examples but here is one.

My Aunt (81 yrs. old) is about 5'2" and 180+. She is diabetic. She
was in the hospital for her sugar being out of control. They were still having
trouble in the hospital getting it consistently under control. They weren’t
looking at what they were feeding her!! Her dinner consisted of mashed potatoes, 2-white flour rolls, boiled to death green beans (the best part of the dinner), and red meat with a ton of gravy on it. Thinking it better for her, they of course gave her several tubs of margarine in lieu of butter. My God... how
backward is all that! ALL her meals were like that. Their answer... treat the
symptom... more insulin more frequently, or new script (more expensive). They
tell her to stay away from sugar, cakes, and cookies... and then give her Tapioca for dessert!! White rice and sugar!!

Most hospitals are death traps. Take responsibility for your own health. Eat smart, eat less, and exercise. MANY excellent health resources on the web to help you pick whole foods that will heal you. Discipline and focus is the problem for most. Watch Dr. Oz each afternoon on TV. He'll get you focused.




I don't think it's fair to make such a generalization and say most hospitals are death traps just because your grandma had a bad experience at one hospital. The hospital that I train at to become a nurse gives every patient an assigned diet plan on their computerized chart (diabetic diet, clear liquids diet, general diet, etc.) The menu is broken into sections for each diet and based on the diet you're assigned to, you're supposed to order meals off of that portion of the list.

And the dieticians do a lot. If someone is taking a certain drug to prevent unwanted blood clotting after surgery, they can't eat too much vitamin K or the drug loses effectiveness. I've seen the dieticians come in and educate the patients on what foods contain vitamin K, how long they need to limit their consumption of these foods, etc. Other drugs can cause toxicity if a patient's potassium levels are too low, so the dietician will educate the patient on foods high in potassium.



Thank you for the reminder that it's National RD Day!  I sent my RD a note this morning thanking her for all her efforts.  What a tough job she has...many times it's offering help and teaching to patients who are not yet "ready, willing, or able" to make lifestyle changes, and people get highly defensive when their habits are challenged (usually at the request of their physicians).  It's a tough job. 

I've met a few bad egg dietitians in my day as well, but like any profession...there are good one's out there and there are bad ones.  The good ones work WITH you, and take your thougths, beliefs, challenges, and concerns into account when helping YOU develop a plan together.  They listen as well as they educate.  There's a reason it's called a healthcare TEAM - and the team is led primarily by the patient. 

Thanks again for the article.

Ang



Any more information on a nutritionist?



Original Post by: tierney7

I'm with Hijuju... I've never met a nutritionally informed RD. It seems they can show results to hardcore cases where ANY change could be better but they don't seem to learn anything about real Health. You can find RD's in all hospitals. I have no idea what these RD's are thinking. I can give several examples but here is one.

My Aunt (81 yrs. old) is about 5'2" and 180+. She is diabetic. She
was in the hospital for her sugar being out of control. They were still having
trouble in the hospital getting it consistently under control. They weren’t
looking at what they were feeding her!! Her dinner consisted of mashed potatoes, 2-white flour rolls, boiled to death green beans (the best part of the dinner), and red meat with a ton of gravy on it. Thinking it better for her, they of course gave her several tubs of margarine in lieu of butter. My God... how
backward is all that! ALL her meals were like that. Their answer... treat the
symptom... more insulin more frequently, or new script (more expensive). They
tell her to stay away from sugar, cakes, and cookies... and then give her Tapioca for dessert!! White rice and sugar!!

Most hospitals are death traps. Take responsibility for your own health. Eat smart, eat less, and exercise. MANY excellent health resources on the web to help you pick whole foods that will heal you. Discipline and focus is the problem for most. Watch Dr. Oz each afternoon on TV. He'll get you focused.




It seems to me that anyone can be bad or good at their jobs.  RD's do great work, and though I've never met with one individually, I've heard a few presentations that were well-grounded in the science of nutrition.  I respect them.  But of course there are always going to be people that do not perform their jobs well, or that are not helpful for us individually.  But I wouldn't write off the entire profession for that!  For example, I've had bad experiences with doctors in the past too, but have now found one that I like a lot.  Something to keep in mind and give them another chance?



the way that it is in my state, according to my dietician, is that nutritionists have to have a Master's degree, while dieticians have to do the internship and the regular re-accredidation. She, however, did both. But anyway, I can attest to how wonderful a dietician or nutritionist can be. I work with up to 5 of them on a daily basis at my eating disorder clinic. I'm in inpatient treatment for anorexia, and they are probably the biggest help. I'm well on my way to a full recovery because of the wonderful Diet Techs and the staff.



Perhaps most is too strong, but to say many is no exaggeration. As I described, it was my Aunt, not my grandma, but I understand how small things like that can be
missed. I understand the job of a RD is more than choosing the individuals diet
while resident in the hospital, although why is it so hard to get that part
right? I also understand that some of this is well beyond your control due to
cost cutting. I'm just saying although Hospitals and Professionals save lives
every day. They take many lives as well. Users beware.

Trust your instincts and get additional opinions. I've had the misfortune of losing
my Mom in a hospital (not at all the hospital's fault) although her meals were atrocious (I brought her (good) food) but the hospital did everything they could to drive every expensive & unnecessary test that could be (over) billed. That's a
different problem.

An estimated 100,000 hospital patients die every year as a direct result of medical malpractice or medical negligence involving surgical mistakes by surgeons and other health care professionals in operating rooms. That does not take into consideration deaths from administering medications which the individual is unable to take (allergy etc..) . They number over 770,000 per year! My wife was in the hospital for a broken leg and had a red wrist band saying she was deathly allergic to acetaminophen. TWICE they handed it to her with her other meds!! Ask Mr. Google about these numbers.

Just as you so accurately attest.. there are very good ones, don’t care ones and poor ones in everything. I have also had a very positive Hospital experience but just believe it wise, if possible, to stay out of them, and question everything. By the way, the hospital I am referencing is an 800+bed, critical care facility that does transplants, open heart etc.. and are nationally linked. The moral of the story for me is get, stay ahead, of the curve.





Sorry, but as a diabetic I have zero use for RD. I went to two different RD at my initial DX and received the same information. And then my doc wondered why my glucose was so messed up since I was following the standard ADA diet. QUIT pushing this diet on people! Please! I stopped following this diet and have lost 20 pounds and my glucose levels are at a level to where I am anticipating an A1c of around 5.5 at my next checkup. Again, please stop this poison!


The article didn't actually explain what the difference is between a dietician and a nutritionist--all it did was tout the glories of dieticians. Just saying.



I have almost reached my weight loss goal but I am working toward building lean muscle mass without much weight change.  I have recently started seeing a registered dietitian who also works as a trainer and she has been beneficial in coaching me on when I need to eat the most during the day and when to kick up the carbs to prevent muscle loss.   I think the key to my success with the dietitian is that I tried to be clear on my expectations for the sessions and relationship and what I hope to achieve.  And in turn, I received a commitment from the dietitian to meet the expectations and act as my coach through the process.



I can't stop laughing at the picture with the girl in a lab coat with a stethoscope!



Rachel, HAPPY RD DAY!!

I really liked your article, I have been toying with the idea of consulting a nutritionist or dietician for quite some time now, and now I have the opportunity through CC's premium services! I look forward to working with you, while gleaning knowledge and support from your expertise!

 



Agree with the comment that there are good and bad in any profession. As a nutritionist, I take exception to the fact that you're stating dieticians have superior qualifications, knowledge and regulation. They don't. I studied long and hard to get my qulaifications and the clients I see have simply amazing results (many having been failed by dieticians and doctors who either dismissed or mis-diagnosed their symptoms). Since I began my practise I have seen awful cases where RDs have given people the most shocking advice, the latest being a liver cancer patient who was told to eat doughnuts and cream to stop losing weight!!  



Agree with the comment that there are good and bad in any profession. As a nutritionist, I take exception to the fact that you're stating dieticians have superior qualifications, knowledge and regulation. They don't. I studied long and hard to get my qulaifications and the clients I see have simply amazing results (many having been failed by dieticians and doctors who either dismissed or mis-diagnosed their symptoms). Since I began my practise I have seen awful cases where RDs have given people the most shocking advice, the latest being a liver cancer patient who was told to eat doughnuts and cream to stop losing weight!!  



this seems more like an ad for RD.  Not enough info about nutritionalists.



I think dieticians/ nutritionists are much like therapists.  There needs to be a specific goal in mind before you enter the office.  Its unfair to assume that when you visit they are just going to make you "better", thats an ambiguous term.  Just as the article states, there are ten, probably more reasons to visit a dietician, can't go in there expecting them to assume you mean all those reasons, they won't know if your caring for the elderly or trying to increase your athletic ability.  There are also professionals who care and those who enjoy the status and power.  I saw two dentists, one said it would be useless for me to get an implant for my missing molar since it will just rot away because its obvious I have no sense of oral hygiene... the other said let the gums heal, see if its uncomfortable to chew and we will discuss the options of a bridge, partial or implant.  Theres a difference between those who love their job and take pride in their work, and those who love their paycheck.  Its always better to have an informed opinion than a "Mr. Google" so called "fact".

Erroneous and internet are sometimes synonymous..

food for thought...



You make it sound so complicated.. Of course having a result in mind is a good idea. I kind of doubt you get people coming in that can't decide if they need to loose a hundred pounds or improve their 1500 meter time. Do people actually come to you and say "make me better", and not know what better is? I could agree they might need guidence on how to become more healthy. I'm gathering you must be a private practice RD? I suggest you interview the person when they come in to see you and from the right questions you should be able to acertain where you may be able to add value most and focus on that? Most people just agree with every "Healthcare Professional" ... when they are less reliable than the internet. It's not an indictment of you sir, it's an indictment of our inferior education system. Kids are graduating High School and can't make change at the checkout without a calculator.. on the simplist of calculations!

As for "Mr. Google" facts you question... Laughingthey are from the US Dept. of Health & Human Services/ Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality. Just as "Registered" and "Certified" do not infer "capable & competent" as we might all expect. There are always people who can memorize and learn, but not take it to practice. If you can't do, teach?

Of course you could question if 770,000 mistakes was accurate. May have only been 630,000. No one likes to hear a bad statistic of their industry, and the fact is most people are not aware of these alarming numbers. We need higher standards in hospitals and healthcare. As they say to the question "what do you call the physician who graduated last at medical school ...... "Doctor".

You sound like someone who cares and takes pride in your work. Just please don't be too quick to defend the marginal healthcare practicioners, and their existence. Lives depend on these people. They are not Gods, but they should be held to a higher standard. Hospital are starting to get wise to Lean & Six Sigma methodologies. This will save a lot of mistakes and create environments where people are not given the wrong meds, or have the wrong organ removed.

 



I completely agree with everyone who is against RD's, this article is not very accurate. I am  holistic Nutritionist with 3 years of school and 4 separate degrees. I have NEVER met an RD who knows what they are talking about with regards to nutrition. I also use a food sensitivity test in my practice (blood test) that is extremely accurate and have had over 300 clients come out with amazing results. If you want more info or to ask questions email me at liveprajna27@gmail.com!

 

Aliste hit it right on the head!



Original Post by: David_Burke

Sorry, but as a diabetic I have zero use for RD. I went to two different RD at my initial DX and received the same information. And then my doc wondered why my glucose was so messed up since I was following the standard ADA diet. QUIT pushing this diet on people! Please! I stopped following this diet and have lost 20 pounds and my glucose levels are at a level to where I am anticipating an A1c of around 5.5 at my next checkup. Again, please stop this poison!

how come no one every quotes the amount of lives saved, or improvements.  



i've now got one and she is more than about diet she really is like a counsellor and finds the real reason for the eating patterns and then helps me change my behaviours to make my diet more efficient. good article. sums it up nicely.



Original Post by: tingsj

I completely agree with everyone who is against RD's, this article is not very accurate. I am  holistic Nutritionist with 3 years of school and 4 separate degrees. I have NEVER met an RD who knows what they are talking about with regards to nutrition. I also use a food sensitivity test in my practice (blood test) that is extremely accurate and have had over 300 clients come out with amazing results. If you want more info or to ask questions email me at liveprajna27@gmail.com!

 

Aliste hit it right on the head!


Shame on you for bashing RD's.  I find that terribly unprofessional.  I've met some pretty hokey holistic people as well, but I do know that there are those out there that know what they're talking about. 



Original Post by: anginwi

Original Post by: tingsj

I completely agree with everyone who is against RD's, this article is not very accurate. I am  holistic Nutritionist with 3 years of school and 4 separate degrees. I have NEVER met an RD who knows what they are talking about with regards to nutrition. I also use a food sensitivity test in my practice (blood test) that is extremely accurate and have had over 300 clients come out with amazing results. If you want more info or to ask questions email me at liveprajna27@gmail.com!

 

Aliste hit it right on the head!


Shame on you for bashing RD's.  I find that terribly unprofessional.  I've met some pretty hokey holistic people as well, but I do know that there are those out there that know what they're talking about. 


I agree, your statement sounds self inflamitory tingsj.  The difference between an RD and a nutritionist in Texas:

Nutritionist:  Online Schooling; Online Exam = Registered Nutritonist

                           $30,000 avg starting salary

Registered Dietician:  Associates/ Bachelors Degree; Internship; Texas State Board Exam = Registered Dietician

                           $40,000 - $45,000 starting salary  (depends on degree)

The difference is a nutritionist doesn't even look at a client before ptacticing.  A dietician is around patients long before becoming registered.  I can be a certified sports nutritionist for $60 bucks.   This shows little respect.  Though, interesting enough... I never met some one one who had the term holistic in their title that didn't bathe in patchoulli oil, wear tie dye, isn't a member of a nudy farm and used "shrooms", "acid", and "spirituality" in the same sentence.  We can all push around stereotypes....



You cannot "shame" me, talk about unprofessional, I would never shame anyone, even if they were horrible at their job. I am not bashing ALL RD's, just the ones I have met, who like a lot of other people commenting on here have had bad experiences. I had one almost kill me because of a completely wrong diagnosis and then not care to even help fix the situation, hence the reason I went back to school and am alive today to talk about. I do completely agree that there are a lot of hokey holistic people out there, they are usually people who haven't had school since anyone can claim they are a "healer". I was also disagreeing with the article, which was my main point, that not all RD's can be trust just because that is their title.




Hey guys... you can poke holes and find both positive & negative opinions to
most any profession. When I think of RD's, perhaps others, think hospitals, and
then I think of hospital meals. You ARE what you eat and many hospitals are
right up there with the (old school) school lunches. I have yet to see a decent
meal served in a hospital. Now I realize you're going to say RD's do more than
this.. BUT... isn't this where it starts! I'm with "Tingsj". I have a
niece who is an RD at a big hospital in NJ. She's drunk the cool-aid and
espouses the American Heart Assoc diet guidelines (which have only recently
begun to move toward healthy) and was killing people with their advice before
this. Things she's learned from recent reprints of 10 & 15 year old
textbooks. This is an extremely dynamic field, and we learn new things daily.
Many doctors are stilted in their vision. I remember 10 years ago in a routine
visit my doctor ordered blood lipids etc.. I noticed he did not ask for Homocysteine or C - reactive protein levels! I asked him why. Funny.. They love to use the term "contra-indicated"... meaning... "We never did this
before"! He thought about it for a second and said... you know that's a
great idea.. I don't know why we don't make that standard! He was only 8-9
years out of med school and had an open mind. These levels are extremely
important predictive markers for stroke or heart attack.. even when your lipids
are within normal ranges. The moral of the story for me... "Anginwi"
is right about bashing. No need for that. But I do believe from my past
experience RD's need to update their education more consistently without just
continuing education credits, or grad degrees for more pay. For once I’d like to walk into a hospital and see a tray of good food for patients; I notice the RD's name on top of the meal choice menu for approval. Wink





A dietician goes through extensive schooling.  I have my undergraduate degree in dietetics and completed an internship at a hospital, cardiac rehab facility, and weight loss center.  After graduating they must enter an intensive 2-3 yr post graduate program to obtain their RD.  It's unfortunate that some people had bad experiences, but is that not always the case in the medical field.....doctors, nurses etc....  Are you never going to go to a Dr. again because you had one with a terrible bedside mannor.  Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist, and the ones that are certified only have to take a 1-2 yr program to obtain certification.  Not that there are not knowledgable "nutritionists" out there, I'm sure there are.  But the schooling, to me, is no where near the same.  In my experience people "hate" RD's because they don't tell you what you want to hear.  I can't tell you how many gastric bypass patients screamed in my face that we were starving them.  It's unfortunate some people have had bad experiences, I have had some with doctors as well but to discredit the entire field is just not right.



Original Post by: biglumox

Original Post by: anginwi

Original Post by: tingsj

I completely agree with everyone who is against RD's, this article is not very accurate. I am  holistic Nutritionist with 3 years of school and 4 separate degrees. I have NEVER met an RD who knows what they are talking about with regards to nutrition. I also use a food sensitivity test in my practice (blood test) that is extremely accurate and have had over 300 clients come out with amazing results. If you want more info or to ask questions email me at liveprajna27@gmail.com!

 

Aliste hit it right on the head!


Shame on you for bashing RD's.  I find that terribly unprofessional.  I've met some pretty hokey holistic people as well, but I do know that there are those out there that know what they're talking about. 


I agree, your statement sounds self inflamitory tingsj.  The difference between an RD and a nutritionist in Texas:

Nutritionist:  Online Schooling; Online Exam = Registered Nutritonist

                           $30,000 avg starting salary

Registered Dietician:  Associates/ Bachelors Degree; Internship; Texas State Board Exam = Registered Dietician

                           $40,000 - $45,000 starting salary  (depends on degree)

The difference is a nutritionist doesn't even look at a client before ptacticing.  A dietician is around patients long before becoming registered.  I can be a certified sports nutritionist for $60 bucks.   This shows little respect.  Though, interesting enough... I never met some one one who had the term holistic in their title that didn't bathe in patchoulli oil, wear tie dye, isn't a member of a nudy farm and used "shrooms", "acid", and "spirituality" in the same sentence.  We can all push around stereotypes....


I think "biglumox" is appropriate moniker. Nudy farm, acid, and knocking things spiritual.... you sir are unprofessional and a disgrace to your profession. You bring discredit to good RD's. People who choose to be so insulting always are minor players in their league. You sound like the animal kingdom's puffer fish... when around larger fish they intake air (hot?) to make themselves look bigger. Having a mouth the size of a Catfish... doesn't make you a big fish. You need serious humility training. "I can be a certified sports nutritionist for $60" ... now that's hillarious. I'm sure you think somone Holistic like Deepak Chopra is just another one of those Holistic nuts.... you probably don't even know who he is! I'm done here. Can't have reason with the broken, uninformed, and unreasonable. Go forth & prosper Mr. Biglumox as a "sports medicene" (certainly never overused term) phenom.



Its all starting to make sense now.  Both tingsj and tierney7 has made lisapistoria's point....

Tingsj, why on earth would you go to a dietician to "diagnose" you, and I'm trying to be as sensitive as possible because, a Doctorate of Medicine does the diagnosis, an MD, the guy that has 8 years of study and hours upon hours of internship.  May as well asked the guy who got an A+ plus in biology whats wrong with you... you have yourself to blame and should be ashamed.

Tierney7, when a doctor orders a blood lipid test he is looking at your blood plasma, cholesterol compared to triglycerides... and again I am being as sensitive as i can... a homocysteine test is to check for malnourishment (lack or folate or vitamin B) or chronic symptoms in babies with homocystinuria.  A c-reactive protein test is ordered when you have a history of bacterial infection, when a baby has signs of sepsis,  rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.  Thus makes those tests both contraindicative and irrelevent.  Of course he is not going to do those when all he wants is your lipid levels.  Your not a doctor.

Which comes to lisapistoria's point, sorry they didn't tell you what "you wanted to hear" and have come to your own conclusions, I'm glad things worked out in the end.  An RD also has to re- certify every couple of years in most states meaning they don't use ten year old texts... they are probably more up to date than anyone concerning dietary heath.  Mark +1: Registered Dieticians...



Original Post by: biglumox

Its all starting to make sense now.  Both tingsj and tierney7 has made lisapistoria's point....

Tingsj, why on earth would you go to a dietician to "diagnose" you, and I'm trying to be as sensitive as possible because, a Doctorate of Medicine does the diagnosis, an MD, the guy that has 8 years of study and hours upon hours of internship.  May as well asked the guy who got an A+ plus in biology whats wrong with you... you have yourself to blame and should be ashamed.

Tierney7, when a doctor orders a blood lipid test he is looking at your blood plasma, cholesterol compared to triglycerides... and again I am being as sensitive as i can... a homocysteine test is to check for malnourishment (lack or folate or vitamin B) or chronic symptoms in babies with homocystinuria.  A c-reactive protein test is ordered when you have a history of bacterial infection, when a baby has signs of sepsis,  rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.  Thus makes those tests both contraindicative and irrelevent.  Of course he is not going to do those when all he wants is your lipid levels.  Your not a doctor.

Which comes to lisapistoria's point, sorry they didn't tell you what "you wanted to hear" and have come to your own conclusions, I'm glad things worked out in the end.  An RD also has to re- certify every couple of years in most states meaning they don't use ten year old texts... they are probably more up to date than anyone concerning dietary heath.  Mark +1: Registered Dieticians...


So big lumox.... you believe testing for elevated levels of Homosysteine and C-Reactive Protein are irrelevant & "contraindicative" unless testing for malnutrition, sepsis in babies or arthritis/Lupas, B6 deficiency..?? Need another one of those extra credit classes buddy.. Currently MANY "Doctors" order this test as a normal course of events as elevated levels show it can be a precusor to heart attack or stroke in adults especially over 50 from narrow arteries etc.. and not just around the heart!! EVEN when lipid ratios are NORMAL!! Need to start reading some JAMA journals! You're about 10-years behind the curve. Recertification is 2/3rd's making sure you didn't forget what they already taught you. Sorry personal experience has shown me in Hospitals they can't even put a good meal plan together! ... and they have Certified and recertified credentials.

I can send you dozens of pages of studies done but it's essentially like:

Department of Medicine, University of Lund, University Hospital, Sweden. torfi.jonasson@kard.lu.se

It has been suggested that hyperhomocysteinemia observed in patients with occlusive vascular disease is caused by reduced renal function secondary to renovascular disease. We have therefore used serum cystatin C, a new sensitive marker for glomerular filtration, in 59 patients with acute coronary syndromes and high plasma homocysteine (tHcy) concentration to measure renal function. Samples were also obtained from 34 patients with low-normal plasma tHcy and 50 control subjects. The patients with low-normal plasma tHcy concentration showed decreased concentrations of serum cystatin C and serum creatinine and increased concentrations of blood folate and serum cobalamin compared to the controls and to the patients with high plasma tHcy. There was a large overlap in cystatin C concentrations between patients with high and low-normal plasma tHcy. None of the parameters investigated except plasma tHcy were significantly different in the group of patients with high plasma tHcy concentration compared to the control group. In order to further demonstrate the importance of renal impairment, a subgroup of the patients with high plasma tHcy was supplemented daily with folic acid 5 mg, pyridoxine 40 mg and cyancobalamin 1 mg for 3 months. Vitamin therapy reduced plasma tHcy from 18.3+/-4.6 pmol/l to 9.6+/-2.2 pmol/l (p<0.0001). However, vitamin treatment did not strengthen the correlation between cystatin C and plasma tHcy concentrations. These findings do not support the hypothesis that subtle renal dysfunction is an important cause of high plasma tHcy concentration in patients with acute coronary syndromes.



Just my opinion......What has the world come to? This is the exact reason why I don't frequent blogs, we have adults going back and forth like bullies on a playground. We need to set a good example for the younger folks who might be reading this....It's a form of bullying and setting a terrible example.....How about this - Don't say anything in a blog that you wouldn't say to someone's face. And treat one another with respect. Maybe you need to agree to disagree and move on with your day...

 



Seriously!  I agree with susiedoozy!  Are you seriously going to ramble on about case studies that many people on here don't really understand or care to understand?!  Just end this already.  The article was just basic info on the difference between an RD and a nutritionist.  Geez!



Hey Suz... nothing wrong with a little spirited discourse. You're right that insults should be left out but "younger folks" are in no peril here viewing this exchange. The most popular video games they play and thirst for slaughter movies would be a good start to minimize, instead of this Blog.

Hell I'd be happy if we could just get the high schools to teach them to make change and all know the name of our first President. We need to have higher expectations for kids, so that they don't grow up thinking people who work hard are not chumps, and don't worry about competing because everyone get's a trophy!!. We essentially have different opinions which we each feel are substantiated by the references we provide. I've said nothing that I would not say to anyones face.

I agree with your "move on" suggestion though. I think we've pretty much pulverized this issue. Cool I also agree with your implying civility has become hard hit in recent years. A lot of people venting in pain out there. We all need to suck it up, and start being nicer to one another. Agreed. You're a doozy Suzie. Laughing

 



Original Post by: tierney7

Hey Suz... nothing wrong with a little spirited discourse. You're right that insults should be left out but "younger folks" are in no peril here viewing this exchange. The most popular video games they play and thirst for slaughter movies would be a good start to minimize, instead of this Blog.

Hell I'd be happy if we could just get the high schools to teach them to make change and all know the name of our first President. We need to have higher expectations for kids, so that they don't grow up thinking people who work hard are not chumps, and don't worry about competing because everyone get's a trophy!!. We essentially have different opinions which we each feel are substantiated by the references we provide. I've said nothing that I would not say to anyones face.

I agree with your "move on" suggestion though. I think we've pretty much pulverized this issue. Cool I also agree with your implying civility has become hard hit in recent years. A lot of people venting in pain out there. We all need to suck it up, and start being nicer to one another. Agreed. You're a doozy Suzie. Laughing

 


H Tierney - you're right I am a doozy....

I try to set a good example whenever possible, however big or small an interaction might be. I agree there are things that can be changed in the schools that could help as well.....The media world in which we live has made it increasingly easy for people to disrespect one another or "hide" between texts or blog posts, etc.

I realize some people are so passionate about their opinions that they go to great lengths to try to prove a point....BUT.....some of the assumptions made in this blog are downright cruel. To make such intimate assumptions about someone's work ethic, salary, drug use, smarts, education, experience, etc. is so very, very wrong. We are all strangers and should not judge someone based on their "title" or "position" or "degree" or "education", etc.  There are both Nutritionists and Dieticians out there who have been the best in class and made a difference in someone's life. I am sure there are also instances where a Nutritionist or Dietician has made a bad decision and negatively affected someone's life. They are people, we are people. And we all deserve to be respected, regardless of our opinion or job title.



Atta girl Doozy Suzi. Kiss

You're right about passion ...sometimes we subjugate our opinions and take up all the air in the room... sure that WE are right. A little peacocking, and becomes less positively colorful. Your message here is somewhere between a plea and a prayer. Good either way. It's tough to remember when you get caught up... to be a thoughtful listener first. I do that better in person. When I write ..... I can't help myself. Lol. I'll shut up now. Back to work to finish up and get outside. Beautiful day. I almost played hooky and golfed.

 



Well I don't know if anyone ever reads these comments after an article, my experience with an NHS dietician wasn't brilliant.

I became a diabetic about ten years ago. I was referred to an NHS dietician.

I honestly can't remember all of the advice, so I'm sure there were some good points, sadly I came out remembering the bad which included:

1. Eat more baked potatos. When asked what about the GL of baked poatatos, was give the answer this is the advise we give.

2. "You will need to starve yourself" advise given to help lose weight.

3. Eat no more than 2 oz portions of meat in a meal. Isn't that rather limiting, not much meat comes in 2 oz portions. The only think I could think of at the time, was a lamb chop completely trimmed, mince, or a Macdonalds burger. It was clear from my question that there was little advice on how to achieve this.

Until I saw the Prof. Stephen Smith's study undertaken at Newcastle it seemed to me I had a disease that at best was monitored as your health declined. After reading that report I came up with a plan to eat loads of food, but achieve his calorie restrictions. Which I did with the help of the tables on this site and food labels. Now I'm healthier, I don't eat baked potatos, I don't starve myself, and I don't limit myslef to 2 ozs of meat. I don't though pig out on huge portions of meat.

My advice, if you're type 2 diabetic get a sight of his study, act accordingly! Forget any other nutritional advice that is contrary, unless it is to do with other complications you may suffer. See your GP and say this is what you want to achieve. Mine was dead against it when he heard what I was going to do, now he has reviewed the logs on how I achieved it, as he's seen the massive improvement in my health.

Ian



I just need to point this out then I'll let it go to avoid the current dialogue from getting any more distasteful, but I LOVE A GOOD DEBATE!

Renal Dysfunction and Renovascular Disease are issues with the kidneys.

Renal Dysfunction is where the kidneys fail to filter enough toxins.

Renovascular Disease is the narrowing of the arteries that supply the kidneys.

The conclusion of the report states:  "However, vitamin treatment did not strengthen the correlation between cystatin C and plasma tHcy (homocysteine) concentrations. These findings do not support the hypothesis that subtle renal dysfunction is an important cause of high plasma tHcy concentration in patients with acute coronary syndromes."

I don't see how this study would imply any medical professional would need to include a homocystine test and a CRP test along with blood lipids.

Then the statement was made:  "The moral of the story for me... "Anginwi"
is right about bashing."

And more recently:  " nothing wrong with a little spirited discourse. You're right that insults should be left out"  and  "I also agree with your implying civility has become hard hit in recent years. A lot of people venting in pain out there. We all need to suck it up, and start being nicer to one another."

While the same person said:  "I think "biglumox" is appropriate moniker. ... You sound like the animal kingdom's puffer fish... when around larger fish they intake air (hot?) to make themselves look bigger. Having a mouth the size of a Catfish... doesn't make you a big fish."

My point, a dietitian and an RD is a professional practice that is both forward thinking and extremely beneficial.  If any one wishes to slander any of those, you got me to deal with.  This puffer fish isn't shy to get involved.

Also to cover the issue of hospital food, an RD is not a chef, they don't personally cook the food or have any control where it comes from.  They do, however, make sure it has enough calories and nutrients (fortified or natural) that recovering patients need.

I'm done..

oh wait.. here's a site for holistic nutrition:

http://www.selfhealingexpressions.com/index.shtml

Nutrition's right above Laughter Therapy, only $34.95

Personally I'm more interested in the Godess Course wouldn't mind summoning one of those....



Original Post by: dopeyrn21

Original Post by: David_Burke

Sorry, but as a diabetic I have zero use for RD. I went to two different RD at my initial DX and received the same information. And then my doc wondered why my glucose was so messed up since I was following the standard ADA diet. QUIT pushing this diet on people! Please! I stopped following this diet and have lost 20 pounds and my glucose levels are at a level to where I am anticipating an A1c of around 5.5 at my next checkup. Again, please stop this poison!

how come no one every quotes the amount of lives saved, or improvements.  


Quit ironic. When I was DX with diabetes I was told by my RD to eat a certain way. That way was to eat between 210g and 240g of carbohydrates per day. I was told this again by a CDE I was required to attend and yet again by a second CDE and RD from the VA. If diabetes is a disease where the body does not properly process carbs, for whatever reason, leading to increases in blood glucose to a point of causing severe and possible fatal complications, why would I want to eat carbs?

When RD, CDE, and others in the medical profession stop telling me and other diabetics to intentionally harm ourselves, then I might start listening. As long as RD and CDE and others are beholden to the ADA things will not change and there will be no improvements in diabetes management and the rate of new diabetics will continue to increase.


Gosh... sorry if using the moniker of YOUR choice yourself insulted you. Hmm. Ok.

I compared you to a Puffer Fish because of your bloviating insults prior to this
against someone else were... "interesting enough... I never met some
one one who had the term holistic in their title that didn't bathe in
patchoulli oil, wear tie dye, isn't a member of a nudy farm and used
"shrooms", "acid", and "spirituality" in the same sentence."


You Said: Also to cover the issue of hospital food, an RD is not a chef, they don't personally cook the food or have any control where it comes from. They do, however, make sure it has enough calories and nutrients (fortified or natural) that recovering patients need. So you defend Hospital food quality
saying you have no control of it... but then say you make sure they have
"enough" calories and nutrients. Funny. Just where do your white
flour dinner rolls fit into your RD food pyramid? Your a waste of time Mr.
Biglumox... and your right ... keep your moniker. I understand. If my spirited
discourse is too much for you.. well... take yourself that goddess course and
get certified.. 2-d's in that by the way.... and one "L" in patchouli.  But lets not get mired in details.

Sorry Suzi... I'm done. Totally.

 



Original Post by: David_Burke

Original Post by: dopeyrn21

Original Post by: David_Burke

Sorry, but as a diabetic I have zero use for RD. I went to two different RD at my initial DX and received the same information. And then my doc wondered why my glucose was so messed up since I was following the standard ADA diet. QUIT pushing this diet on people! Please! I stopped following this diet and have lost 20 pounds and my glucose levels are at a level to where I am anticipating an A1c of around 5.5 at my next checkup. Again, please stop this poison!

how come no one every quotes the amount of lives saved, or improvements.  


Quit ironic. When I was DX with diabetes I was told by my RD to eat a certain way. That way was to eat between 210g and 240g of carbohydrates per day. I was told this again by a CDE I was required to attend and yet again by a second CDE and RD from the VA. If diabetes is a disease where the body does not properly process carbs, for whatever reason, leading to increases in blood glucose to a point of causing severe and possible fatal complications, why would I want to eat carbs?

When RD, CDE, and others in the medical profession stop telling me and other diabetics to intentionally harm ourselves, then I might start listening. As long as RD and CDE and others are beholden to the ADA things will not change and there will be no improvements in diabetes management and the rate of new diabetics will continue to increase.

You can still eat carbohydrates if you're diabetic. They should just be complex carbohydrates that will digest more slowly and not give a huge surge of glucose all at once.

I have a very hard time believing everyone that's saying that a doctor, dietician, or any other health care worker that's undergone any substantial training would encourage a diabetic to shovel in the white dinner rolls, baked potatoes, and other empty carbohydrates down their throat.

We live in a time where information is readily available if you simply take the time to look for it. If you and some of the other diabetic people that commented on here feel as though you're getting bad advice from health care workers, why don't you seek out facts for yourselves? Obviously everyone on here as internet access. If I were you, I would educate myself on the pathophysiology of diabetes. If you understand it, you will probably be able to manage it better.

 



Original Post by: rachelwert

Original Post by: David_Burke

Original Post by: dopeyrn21

Original Post by: David_Burke

Sorry, but as a diabetic I have zero use for RD. I went to two different RD at my initial DX and received the same information. And then my doc wondered why my glucose was so messed up since I was following the standard ADA diet. QUIT pushing this diet on people! Please! I stopped following this diet and have lost 20 pounds and my glucose levels are at a level to where I am anticipating an A1c of around 5.5 at my next checkup. Again, please stop this poison!

how come no one every quotes the amount of lives saved, or improvements.  


Quit ironic. When I was DX with diabetes I was told by my RD to eat a certain way. That way was to eat between 210g and 240g of carbohydrates per day. I was told this again by a CDE I was required to attend and yet again by a second CDE and RD from the VA. If diabetes is a disease where the body does not properly process carbs, for whatever reason, leading to increases in blood glucose to a point of causing severe and possible fatal complications, why would I want to eat carbs?

When RD, CDE, and others in the medical profession stop telling me and other diabetics to intentionally harm ourselves, then I might start listening. As long as RD and CDE and others are beholden to the ADA things will not change and there will be no improvements in diabetes management and the rate of new diabetics will continue to increase.

You can still eat carbohydrates if you're diabetic. They should just be complex carbohydrates that will digest more slowly and not give a huge surge of glucose all at once.

I have a very hard time believing everyone that's saying that a doctor, dietician, or any other health care worker that's undergone any substantial training would encourage a diabetic to shovel in the white dinner rolls, baked potatoes, and other empty carbohydrates down their throat.

We live in a time where information is readily available if you simply take the time to look for it. If you and some of the other diabetic people that commented on here feel as though you're getting bad advice from health care workers, why don't you seek out facts for yourselves? Obviously everyone on here as internet access. If I were you, I would educate myself on the pathophysiology of diabetes. If you understand it, you will probably be able to manage it better.

 


"I have a very hard time believing everyone that's saying that a doctor, dietician, or any other health care worker that's undergone any substantial training would encourage a diabetic to shovel in the white dinner rolls, baked potatoes, and other empty carbohydrates down their throat."

Well Rachel, baked potatoes aren't empty carbs, however they spike your blood sugar. They have fibre vitamin c etc, but not a good idea if you're diabetic.

Ian



Its interesting how much more heated this topic is compared to the fructose one.  I am really at awe.  I have got to agree with rachelwert.  I spent just 20 min talking to a sports nutritionist at the GYM and she was able to explain to me glycemic index and glycemic load.  I think someone with more education would be able to get that point across.  200-240 carbs is 40% of a 2000 calorie diet.  Thats not alot, infact the girl i spoke to told me to stay above 50% since I frequented the GYM and was diagnosed with pre diabetes almost a year ago.  Carbs does not = white dinner rolls or baked potatoes.  They are in both those, along with other nutrients, but doesn't define "Carbs".   200 carbs are in one cup of granulated sugar, that doesn't mean, by doctors orders you need to down a cup of sugar each day.  Carbs are in whole vegetables, legumes, fruits and of course grains.  Infact fruits and veggies contain sugar carbs, is anyone gonna get upset because the doc or RD said eat whole fruits and veggies?  Hope not, because some studies show inconclusive evidence certain whole veggies can actually reverse type 2 diabetes.   If not from carbs where on earth are you going to get energy from?  Don't you dare say ketones either, thats another hot topic.  Diabetics don't have a problem processing carbs, the issue is how the body handles glucose once the carb is processed.  While there is 18g of sugar carbs in one cup of beets and its glycemic index is high, 64 (sugar is 70) its glycemic load comes out to 11 which is just above the low range.  Being diabetic doesnt mean you can't have carbs or even candy, just can't eat it all at once.  1/4 cup (before cookin) brown rice has 30 carbs glycemic index of 50, glycemic load of 15, moderate.  1/2 cup, 60 carbs, glycemic load 30 very high=bad for diabetics, eat a 1/4 cup at a time or less.  I hope this helps because without carbs its hard to find the energy to do the minimal 30 min low impact exercise, which I'm sure the doc also recommended. 

food for thought...



Original Post by: rachelwert

Original Post by: David_Burke

Original Post by: dopeyrn21

Original Post by: David_Burke

Sorry, but as a diabetic I have zero use for RD. I went to two different RD at my initial DX and received the same information. And then my doc wondered why my glucose was so messed up since I was following the standard ADA diet. QUIT pushing this diet on people! Please! I stopped following this diet and have lost 20 pounds and my glucose levels are at a level to where I am anticipating an A1c of around 5.5 at my next checkup. Again, please stop this poison!

how come no one every quotes the amount of lives saved, or improvements.  


Quit ironic. When I was DX with diabetes I was told by my RD to eat a certain way. That way was to eat between 210g and 240g of carbohydrates per day. I was told this again by a CDE I was required to attend and yet again by a second CDE and RD from the VA. If diabetes is a disease where the body does not properly process carbs, for whatever reason, leading to increases in blood glucose to a point of causing severe and possible fatal complications, why would I want to eat carbs?

When RD, CDE, and others in the medical profession stop telling me and other diabetics to intentionally harm ourselves, then I might start listening. As long as RD and CDE and others are beholden to the ADA things will not change and there will be no improvements in diabetes management and the rate of new diabetics will continue to increase.

You can still eat carbohydrates if you're diabetic. They should just be complex carbohydrates that will digest more slowly and not give a huge surge of glucose all at once.

I have a very hard time believing everyone that's saying that a doctor, dietician, or any other health care worker that's undergone any substantial training would encourage a diabetic to shovel in the white dinner rolls, baked potatoes, and other empty carbohydrates down their throat.

We live in a time where information is readily available if you simply take the time to look for it. If you and some of the other diabetic people that commented on here feel as though you're getting bad advice from health care workers, why don't you seek out facts for yourselves? Obviously everyone on here as internet access. If I were you, I would educate myself on the pathophysiology of diabetes. If you understand it, you will probably be able to manage it better.

 


So you say I can eat carbs? Strange. Even when I eat so-called healthy carbs my glucose spikes to unacceptable levels. For me and many others with diabetes there is no such thing as healthy carbs. I guess when people have been indoctrinated for 50+ years about the benefits of carbs and the dangers if natural fats it's hard for people to believe the contrary. Trust me, I eat less than 60g of carbs per day while eating about 125g of natural fats and haven't been this healthy since I was 20.

And my measuring sticks? My weight, lipid panels, and meter. Those don't lie!


Original Post by: biglumox

Its interesting how much more heated this topic is compared to the fructose one.  I am really at awe.  I have got to agree with rachelwert.  I spent just 20 min talking to a sports nutritionist at the GYM and she was able to explain to me glycemic index and glycemic load.  I think someone with more education would be able to get that point across.  200-240 carbs is 40% of a 2000 calorie diet.  Thats not alot, infact the girl i spoke to told me to stay above 50% since I frequented the GYM and was diagnosed with pre diabetes almost a year ago.  Carbs does not = white dinner rolls or baked potatoes.  They are in both those, along with other nutrients, but doesn't define "Carbs".   200 carbs are in one cup of granulated sugar, that doesn't mean, by doctors orders you need to down a cup of sugar each day.  Carbs are in whole vegetables, legumes, fruits and of course grains.  Infact fruits and veggies contain sugar carbs, is anyone gonna get upset because the doc or RD said eat whole fruits and veggies?  Hope not, because some studies show inconclusive evidence certain whole veggies can actually reverse type 2 diabetes.   If not from carbs where on earth are you going to get energy from?  Don't you dare say ketones either, thats another hot topic.  Diabetics don't have a problem processing carbs, the issue is how the body handles glucose once the carb is processed.  While there is 18g of sugar carbs in one cup of beets and its glycemic index is high, 64 (sugar is 70) its glycemic load comes out to 11 which is just above the low range.  Being diabetic doesnt mean you can't have carbs or even candy, just can't eat it all at once.  1/4 cup (before cookin) brown rice has 30 carbs glycemic index of 50, glycemic load of 15, moderate.  1/2 cup, 60 carbs, glycemic load 30 very high=bad for diabetics, eat a 1/4 cup at a time or less.  I hope this helps because without carbs its hard to find the energy to do the minimal 30 min low impact exercise, which I'm sure the doc also recommended. 

food for thought...


Since you've been diagnosed as "pre" that already means your pancreas is failing. Since D is a condition where your body has difficulty processing carbs, why would you give it carbs? A a "pre" you've already lost about 20% of your pancreas' ability to convert carbs. By eating that high a level of carb all you are doing is ensuring just how rapidly you will be diagnosed as full diabetic.

I'll suggest this, go to Walmart and spend the 50 bucks for a Relion glucose meter and a box of strips. Test immediately before eating then one and two hours after that. Do that for a week. Them come back and tell us what you saw. I think you'll be on for a surprise.


And one other thing. The only cure for diabetes, whether it is type 1 , 1.5, 2, LADA or LADY is a pancrease transplant. The rest is just managing.


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