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Calorie Count Blog

Food Reviews: Two Fiber-Rich Cereals


By tanyapt on Oct 19, 2010 10:00 AM in Tips & Updates

By Tanya Tailor, PhD

When choosing a cereal I primarily look for those that provide nutritional value, such as high in fiber and/or protein. In replenishing my stash, I decided to purchase and review one of the most popular high fiber cereals, Fiber One Honey Clusters, compared to another that is also high fiber, but with a more natural ingredients list, Organic Weetabix Crispy Flakes & Fiber Cereal.


Organic Weetabix Crispy Flakes & Fiber Cereal

The box bears both the USDA Organic Seal and the Whole Grains Stamp from The Whole Grains Council. Each 55 gram serving (1.25 cups) provides 6 grams of protein and has 28 grams of whole grains which provides 11 grams of fiber.

(1) Describe the appearance

This cereal has flakes, like corn flakes, and “twig” lookalikes.

(2) Describe the taste

On it's own this Weetabix cereal has a slightly sweet bran taste like raisin bran comes to mind but without the raisins.  But when I added my usual Blue Diamond Unsweetened Almond Milk and spooned up a mouthful, the cereal lost it's sweetness and was a bit bland and uneventful. While there was no 'WOW' factor, I liked this cereal well enough – not everything I eat has to WOW me - but if there is another cereal that is equally nutritious, similarly priced and way more tasty, then I'll switch in a heartbeat.

(3) What did you like about it?

The 11 grams of fiber and 6 grams of protein coupled with the stellar ingredient list was what attracted me to this cereal (each 55 gram serving also provides 170 calories and 10 grams of sugars). The ingredients are organic whole wheat, organic wheat bran, organic dehydrated cane juice, organic oat hull fiber, organic barley malt extract, organic oat bran, sea salt, baking soda, and annatto. There is also an added supplement blend that provides 25% of the daily value for most vitamins and minerals.

(4) What did you not like about it?

The taste was not my favorite aspect of this cereal, but there are so many ways to improve this. Adding it to some low fat yogurt, or simply adding some fresh or dried fruit.

(5) How does this food compare to similar and competing products?

In terms of organic cereals, this Weetabix cereal has some of the best nutrition facts I've seen, but the sodium content is a bit high at 320 mg (13% of the daily value). Another organic cereal choice, lower in sodium but without as much fiber and protein, is Health Valley Organic MultiGrain Apple Cinnamon Square Ems Cereal reviewed at iateapie.net. That cereal provides 210 calories, 8 grams of fiber, 5 grams of protein and 12 grams of sugar per 55 gram serving (1.25 cups).


Fiber One Honey Clusters Cereal

The claims on the front of the box promise a lightly sweetened cereal of whole grain flakes and honey clusters. And just in case the name of the cereal doesn't give away that this is high in fiber, the packaging boldly shouts that there is 51% of the daily value of fiber from 13 grams of fiber in one cup.

(1) Describe the appearance

This cereal also has the look of flakes, sprinkled with small balls of oats clustered together.

(2) Describe the taste

On it's own, the Fiber One flakes have a slightly sweet taste, more than the Weetabix, but without the wheaty bran taste.  As I was eating a few bites of the cereal sans milk, I was pondering how this cereal could be sweeter than Weetabix cereal when it had half as much sugar. Could my taste buds be going haywire? That's when the slight after-taste hit me and I knew the reason: while I had looked over the Nutrition Facts in detail prior to scooping out some cereal, I had merely glanced at the lengthy ingredients list and had overlooked an ingredient. From the after-taste that, I suspected that there might be sucralose present (common name Splenda), and on closer inspection, my suspicions were confirmed.

When I added milk (unsweetened almond milk), there was no after-taste, and the cereal was plain, like the Weetabix. There was a little extra texture and sweetness from the honey clusters, of which there was plenty, but still, this cereal is pretty much like other corn and wheat flakes.

(3) What did you like about it?

The 13 grams of fiber and low 6 grams of sugar per 52 gram serving (1 cup) was what attracted me to this cereal.

(4) What did you not like about it?

The ingredients list is somewhat lengthy and for anyone not loving high fructose corn syrup, know that it is present, along with the artificial sweetener sucralose, as previously mentioned.

(5) How does this food compare to similar and competing products?

Really, it's hard to find another cereal with as much fiber as Fiber One cereals and, certainly, I haven't tried many. A possible alternative is Kashi Good Friends High Fiber Cereal (Original), which provides 160 calories, 12 grams of fiber, 5 grams of protein, and 10 grams of sugars per 53 gram (1 cup) serving. An added bonus is that Kashi cereal has no artificial sweeteners, and the ingredients list (which can be found at the Kashi website), is a little cleaner (no HFCS either).

Summary

If I had to choose between the two cereals, I would go with the Organic Weetabix Crispy Flakes & Fiber because it still has a lot of fiber (11 grams) along with double the protein of Fiber One (which has 3 grams), plus the ingredients list is a lot simpler.


Your thoughts....

What do you look for when choosing a cereal?  What are your favorite cereals?


Tanya Taylor founded Iateapie.net in 2004 while working on a PhD in Food Science and Nutrition at Auburn University (Alabama). Shortly after graduation (in August 2006), she moved to Ann Arbor, MI and started working as a Food Chemist.  She recently  relocated to New York where she continues to run Iateapie.net, along with IntheGym.net, which features workout playlists.

Calorie Count follows About.com's Ethics Policy when it comes to reviewing products.



Comments


Nothing like Kashi Go Lean - 13g protein, 10g fiber, 1g fat and only 140 calories per cup.

Peg

 



Uncle Sam Original or with Mixed Berries - 7g protein, 10g fiber, 5g fat, less than 1g sugar, 190 calories per 3/4 cup. It's extremely filling with a good portion size and no funky ingredients.



I switched from Fiber One original to toasted wheat bran.  I sprinkle wheat bran on top of yogurt, and sometimes mix it with a cereal like Kashi GoLean or Heart to Heart.  Gram for gram, wheat bran has the same amount of fiber, calories and more protein than Fiber One original.  It's half the price and ALL natural (no unpronounceable ingredients!) - and it can be used in a variety of ways!

 



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I used to eat a mixture of fiber one cereal (the plain one) and shredded wheat with soymilk. The sweetness from the fiber one was nice. It was good until I changed breakfasts.

For a little while I thought I needed the fiber, but now I don't even keep track anymore because I get plenty without fortified products. I actually STOPPED eating high fiber cereal bars (my post work pre gym go-to) because I was getting way too much fiber. If I ever go back to cereal it will be shredded wheat, or maybe something with "clusters". I'm done with fiber enriched foods, and want balanced ones instead.

 

 



I am a convert to just about anything Kashi.  I love their cereals and their oatmeal--and usually have one of those two for breakfast each morning.  They taste good and quell my hunger.  Their granola bars are the perfect snack, and their frozen entrees are the only ones I know of that fill you up.  I'm not worried about bit of minutiae about ingredients--because in the long run I'm gonna eat what tastes good and doesn't leave me with a rumbling tummy an hour later.

 



Fiber One = aspartame! That is why the original only has 60 calories!

I have a solution. I buy some that taste good and some that have better nutrition and some that do both. I dump 3-6 varied boxes in a big container, shake it up and store in ziplock bags. Then I plug it into a recipe and decide how many servings I want it to be, ie. how many calories I want to eat for breakfast and bingo, good tasting cereal WITH great nutrition. I too use the Almond Milk, unsweetened, but the vanilla flavor. It adds a richer creamier flavor to cereal and smoothies. Right now I am making 4-6 servings of steel cut oatmeal (takes 45 minutes or longer to cook) at time, storing it in plastic containers and warm it up in the microwave every morning. A suggestion I read somewhere, instead of one cup of water to every 1/4 cup of steel cut oats, add more, like a cup and a half and cook longer. Amazingly, you get more volume of cereal for the same amount of calories!



half cup of Kellog Bran Buds has 70 cal, 1 g. of fat and 13 g of fiber. In the WW plan that equals 0 points. Add half-cup of low fat milk and you have a breakfast food equally only one point. The fiber content makes it filling and the crunchiness of the bran adds to that sensation. It has a pleasant taste in my estimation as well. 



I can't eat any cereals with extra fiber because they make my intestines "percolate,'" which is a very uncomfortable feeling!  Fortunately, I get a lot of fiber in my diet from fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, nuts and seeds.  (Raisin bran really does me in!)  I only mention this, in case there are others that find that these added fiber cereals disagree with them. 

Here is a list of food servings that have 3 grams of fiber. Foods with Fiber



High fiber, usually added fiber, isn't everything in a cereal.  Both these cereals have way too much sugar, and some of it artificial sweetners. Kashi Go Lean (not the Crunch) is good, but still has too much sugar.  After steel cut, or regular oatmeal, Kashi 7 Whole Grain Puffs is my choice.  Just 70 calories, .5 gr fat and O sugar.  The ingredient list lists only the grains.  Not a lot of fiber, but no sugar is the draw.



I like Trader Joe's High Fiber cereal. 9 grams of fiber and only 5 grams of sugar, and I like the taste. Note that there is an error on the nutritional label facsimile posted on  the CC database - a serving size is 2/3 cup, not 2 cups (I've emailed them about this twice, but I guess they don't care).



My favourite for fibre and a tasty, stick-to-your-ribs breakfast is half a cup of mixed oatmeal and Red River (a 7-grain cereal), usually cooked with chopped apple and cinnamon. It tastes delicious and is wonderfully warm and filling.

Calorie count is 150 for the oatmeal and an average of 30 calories for the apple, depending on how much apple I add. It has approx. 6 grams of fibre per serving, not counting whatever is added by the apple. On a practical level, I  notice when I eat it regular... so am I. ;-)

Yes, I have to cook it but it doesn't take long and it is well worth the extra bit of effort.



Kashi go lean!  I have lost 100 pounds.  Eat it every morning!



I used to be a fan of Kashi.  But then I found out it's just another name for Kelloggs.  They're the same company producing under different names.  After that, I felt disillusioned and betrayed with Kashi and forevermore it's off my list, good for you or not.  I just can't take trickery.

I eat shredded wheat if I feel like cereal (with bananas chopped in).  I'm usually a toast or oatmeal person, though.

Damn Kelloggs trickery.



Even as a toddler, the only cereal I would eat is Cheerios.  And it remains my one and only to this day.  No milk, no fruit, no adding whatevers, just straight up plain dry Cheerios. 

I'd rather go hungry than eat another cereal.  And that includes oatmeal.



Why is Kelloggs owning Kashi considered "trickery?"  I can't see that either company is trying to trick anyone.  Kashi, (with a few exceptions) is still putting out the same products with the same ingredients, and Kelloggs is producing others.   Kelloggs is a large company, but certainly not worthy of such demonic designations.



I LOVE..... Kashi GO LEAN. Not the crunch one, just the regular one. It is so yummy, healthy and very filling. I have it most mornings.



Kashi Go Lean is the best! can't buy it anymore though bcuz I tend to go overboard with the cereal, can't stop after one bowl!



I agree with imia345: Nothing beats Kashi Go Lean. I like a little more good fat than Go Lean provides, so I add a tablespoon of chopped walnuts. Ummmm, Good!



Since i'm diabetic I purchase whatever multi-grain unsweetened cereal and combine it with bran twigs. I like combining two cereals together while watching portion size. Then i would add everything else like fruit , nuts etc.

 




4servings


1 cup oatmeal 1/4 cup cream of wheat 1/4 cup 7 grain cereal 1/4 cup oat bran 1 tbsp ground flax seed 1/2 oz. soy protein powder 2 cups 2% milk Calories170 Sodium 52mg 2% Carbohydrates 21.8g Dietary Fiber 2.6g  Protein10.4g

Read more: http://caloriecount.about.com/healthy-oatmeal-recipe-r222067 #ixzz12pcymDOB
Almost every morning we have this for breakfast. We actually mix a package of  all the cereals at once with the protein powder and store in a couple of tupperwares. The 7 grain cereal is actually Sunny Boy, or Red River cereal, which do not turn up on CC lists, and the fiber content is therefore higher than CC gives the recipe credit for. Just cook 1/3 cup of the premixed cereal with 1/4 tsp. salt, and  2 cups of water for a few minutes  for 2 servings and serve with your choice of milk. Sweetening (Try a tablespoon of maple syrup) is optional. Add or subtract cereals to suit your taste, add dried fruit, like raisins, craisins, currants, etc. if wanted. The protein powder adds the much needed protein, which will keep you from being hungry. I also frequently add cinnamon. If you want to just microwave it with milk, put in a deep container like a 1 litre measuring cup, as it will foam up a lot while cooking in the microwave. This gives you the nutritional benefit from many whole grains, as well as enough protein to get through to lunch, even with active mornings. This is also much more economical than purchasing commercial dry cereals. We also have a piece of fruit with breakfast.



Kashi was bought up by Kellogg's a few years ago.  I have been eating Kashi before it became mainstream (thanks to Kellogg's  I assume).  Many large corporations buy out smaller companies.  Sometimes the products change for the worse and sometimes not.  I haven't noticed any changed in the Kashi products I use.  I love their Go Lean Cereal as well as their crunchy granola bars.  You would be surprised to find out how many of your smaller organic brands are actually owned by larger corporations. 



I too am a Kashi-go-lean fan!!! love love love it with unsweetened almond milk...yummy Smile and some fresh berry's on top!



I like steel cut oats cooked with ground flax seeds.  Add home made preserves, fresh fruit, nuts or peanut butter for a wide variety of flavors and textures.

No artificial anything.  Minimal processing.  And no Frankensoy food-like substances.



My favorite breakfast is Kashi Heart to Heart mixed into some Greek yogurt.  Fiber One products tend to make me feel bloated, but I'd like to try this Weetabix organic cereal.  I'm always looking for tasty ways to add more fiber and protein to my diet.  Maybe in my greek yogurt, the Weetabix would be good.



Original Post by: thesaurophile

My favorite breakfast is Kashi Heart to Heart mixed into some Greek yogurt.  Fiber One products tend to make me feel bloated, but I'd like to try this Weetabix organic cereal.  I'm always looking for tasty ways to add more fiber and protein to my diet.  Maybe in my greek yogurt, the Weetabix would be good.


Reply to kay_h: FRANKENSOY??? Please do a little research. Soy protein provides a healthy way to get non-animal protein into your diet. Recent research has shown that getting a higher percentage of calories from protein helps the body burn fat more efficiently. Soy protein can have a plethora of healthy effects on the body, including  remarkable health benefits for people suffering from type 2 diabetes. It is ideal for high protein/low carb diets, which are much easier to lose weight with when the carbs come from fruits and vegetables and a few whole grains products. It's valuable constituents include saponins, phytosterols, and isoflavones. Saponins support healthy immune system function and combine with cholesterol to reduce it's absorption into the body through the small intestine, contributing to increases in HDL cholesterol (the "good" kind). Phytosterols have also been shown to help maintain cholesterol levels already within normal range.The anabolic isoflavones in soy (genistein and daidzein), not only have exhibited effects as powerful antioxidants, but have been shown to exhibit positive health benefits for both men and women. The brand I usually use is GENISOY NATURAL SOY PROTEIN POWDER. Fortified with 19 vitamins and minerals, and providing 14g of pure, isolated soy protein per serving, with no added artificial sweeteners, it  can be added to any cooking or baking recipe for more nutrition and better health.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soy_protein (detailed information)

http://www.naturalnews.com/001620.html

http://www.naturalnews.com/025918_protein_body_weight.html



Both the cereals are processed with sugar and other ingredients found only in a lab; despite of the fiber in them. I think unsweetened muesli like Dorset is the best. It has no sugar in it and all ingredients(other then rolled oats and wheat) are in their natural form. To sweeten the cereal raisins and dates are added.  



I eat a mix of Kashi GoLean and Fiber One original every workday morning.  I bring it to work in my bento- the cereals mixed in the larger top container, and some diced fruit in the smaller lower container.  Then I mix the two in a bowl with some skim milk and that plus a carton of Yoplait light tides me over 'till lunch break, all for under 300 calories!



I never meant that Kashi and/or Kelloggs is diabolical or bad in any way.  I just felt like I was being tricked.  If it belongs to Kelloggs, why not market it as Kelloggs?

I know that Kashi was started independently, but I'm very wary of marketing, and how companies pass of unhealthy food as healthy alternatives.  Especially when they have adverts on TV showing some granola-y hippy looking woman tasting vanilla beans in India somewhere.  Like they're going to take them home and grind them in a pestle and lovingly put them into the cereal by hand....

Not to say that Kashi or Kelloggs uses vanilla squirted out of chicken butts or something.  :)  I'm just wary, and sensitive to trickery by large corporations.  If you're Kelloggs, be Kelloggs.  Kelloggs cereal can be just as healthy, just don't deceive me by using another "healthy-sounding" corporate name.

Yes, I'm incredibly stubborn, and a little irrational.... but emotions are emotions.  :)  I'm not saying everyone else has to give up Kashi as some kind of evil corporate trick.  I just feel the way I do, and that's the way I am.  :D



Original Post by: thegoodpotato

I never meant that Kashi and/or Kelloggs is diabolical or bad in any way.  I just felt like I was being tricked.  If it belongs to Kelloggs, why not market it as Kelloggs?

I know that Kashi was started independently, but I'm very wary of marketing, and how companies pass of unhealthy food as healthy alternatives.  Especially when they have adverts on TV showing some granola-y hippy looking woman tasting vanilla beans in India somewhere.  Like they're going to take them home and grind them in a pestle and lovingly put them into the cereal by hand....

Not to say that Kashi or Kelloggs uses vanilla squirted out of chicken butts or something.  :)  I'm just wary, and sensitive to trickery by large corporations.  If you're Kelloggs, be Kelloggs.  Kelloggs cereal can be just as healthy, just don't deceive me by using another "healthy-sounding" corporate name.

Yes, I'm incredibly stubborn, and a little irrational.... but emotions are emotions.  :)  I'm not saying everyone else has to give up Kashi as some kind of evil corporate trick.  I just feel the way I do, and that's the way I am.  :D


Btw, has anyone tried the Kashi frozen meals?  They are loaded with nutrients and whole grains.  A little pricey ($3.79) per meal. And although they look small, they are very filling.  They are a great alternative for those who do not have much time or inclination to plan in advance and cook a meal after working all day.  My favorite is the Mayan Harvest Bake - and this is a vegetarian dish.  For those who require more calories, you can certainly use the Mayan Harvest Bake as a side to another protein.  In an effort to save money, I have copied the ingredients including all 7 or more whole grains that Kashi includes in their recipes for the frozen dinners.  It is amazing how much money you can save and the food is fresh - not frozen.  However, if you are inclined to cook meals ahead of time, these meals and ingredients do freeze well.Smile

I know what you mean, "goodpotatoe" that there are many products with hidden sugars and other ingredients that are not healthy.  But, we do the best we can, and we keep reading the labels.Foot in mouth

 



Original Post by: pushbuttonkitty

I eat a mix of Kashi GoLean and Fiber One original every workday morning.  I bring it to work in my bento- the cereals mixed in the larger top container, and some diced fruit in the smaller lower container.  Then I mix the two in a bowl with some skim milk and that plus a carton of Yoplait light tides me over 'till lunch break, all for under 300 calories!


I think this is great "PBK"!!!!Smile

I have a breakfast recipe that I love and would like to share with anyone who might be interested.

 

 

Egg Whites - Egg Substitute A- 90 50 Cottage Cheese, Lowfat, 1% Milkfat B 57 41 Spinach - Cooked, Boiled, Drained, Without Salt A 45 10 Deli Flats - 100 Calorie Thin rolls A 22 51 Strawberries - Fresh Fruit A 147 45 Tomatoes, Red, Ripe - Raw, Year Round Average A 37 7 Original Raw Chia Seeds A- 5 23

 Total calories = 228

Have a wonderful day!!



arent frozen meals loaded loaded with sodium(salt)?



Original Post by: samhainaz

arent frozen meals loaded loaded with sodium(salt)?


Yes.  The Kashi frozen meals do have less than most, but for the frozen dinners that are low sodium.

For instance, the Kashi Mayan Harvest Bake has 380mg of sodium.  Not great, but not that bad either.

 



I like "red berries" from Kellogg.  Fiber 3gr and sugar only 9g. No protein though. :( 



Original Post by: falseandtrue

I like "red berries" from Kellogg.  Fiber 3gr and sugar only 9g. No protein though. :( 


No protein...hmmm; so all calories come from carbs.  You only list the sugar as 9 gm and the fiber as 3 gr.   How many actual carbs are in a serving?  Are the sugars and carbs the same value?  I ask because if they are then a serving = 36 calories?



it says 27 carbs and below OTHER CARBS -15



 I forgot to mention how i like to eat it. with a cup of almod vanilllllllla millk. :) there are protein 1g,  fat 1, carbs 16, fiber -1 sugar 15.. too much carbs???



Original Post by: falseandtrue

it says 27 carbs and below OTHER CARBS -15


ok so no fat; no protein and 27 total carbs which includes the 15 mg of sugars and 3 gms of fiber. 

Therefore each serving has approx = 108 calories?  Is that what the box states?



ok so the cereal has 27 carbs as stated above with 3 gm fiber and 15 gm sugar = 108 cal per serving

add to that: 1 cup almond van milk with

carbs = 16

sugar = 15  (way too high) this makes up 94% of the carbs!)

Fat = 1 gm

Pro = 1 gm

so basically you are adding another = 77 calories?  does that sound accurate? so total meal is about 185 calories?  how many calories does the milk state for a 1 cup serving?

Problem with the "milk" is that it really isnt a milk at all.  It is a sugary drink.

It's is not that the carbs are high, but that your carbs are made up mostly of sugar.  When you consider that there are a total of 43  total carbs and only 3 gms of that is fiber; and and of the total carbs, there are 30 gms of sugars or 70% sugar THAT IS WAY TO MUCH sugar.  I am sure it tastes just great but it is not that healthy for you.

Why not use regular 1% milk to your cereal and then ad 1/4 tsp vanilla extract; and 1/4 almond extract; and a couple of packets of Splenda?



Original Post by: samhainaz

Since i'm diabetic I purchase whatever multi-grain unsweetened cereal and combine it with bran twigs. I like combining two cereals together while watching portion size. Then i would add everything else like fruit , nuts etc.

 


What are bran twigs?



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WILL THE MODERATOR OF CC PLEASE GET RID OF THIS PERSON WHO KEEPS POSTING INAPPROPRIATELY TO THIS SITE.

IT IS SPOILING IT FOR THE REST OF US WHO CARE ENOUGH TO USE THE SITE AND WHO APPRECIATE CC



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I love Nature's Path Optimum Slim.  Fiber = 9, Sugar = 7



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