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Anybody here use creatine?


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I spend way too much time looking at a variety of websites on weight lifting, nutrition, weight loss, etc.  So I was intrigued when I came across a statement on Tony Gentilcore's website that all women should use creatine. 

I take flax and fish oil, a multi vitamin, Vit D3, iodine and B12.  I am also having bio-identical hormone treatment for being an old lady. 

But some of the comments by the women after the article suggested that a 55 lb increase in squat weight (130 to 185) over a couple of months was due, at least in part, to using creatine.  I am contemplating getting some. 

So, if I get it, what formulation works best  - Capsules/chews/powder? 

If you use it, did you front load to raise your level and then go down to a normal dosage?

I am looking for a bit of a magic bullet here, because I feel that some of my lifts (squat and OHP) are not progressing as I would like.  So, if you stop using it , do you lose your superpowers?

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I've used it before, and I followed the whole "front-loading" thing. I've read that powder is the best way to go.

I don't know that creatine is going to help you much though unless you are lifting heavy already and are looking for minimal gains. I highly, highly put into question the statements by those women that creating played a large role in their squat going from 130 to 185. Like I said, creatine definitely helps, but it's not going to make you lift 25 lbs more. Not even close IMO.

Original Post by despinamb:

I spend way too much time looking at a variety of websites on weight lifting, nutrition, weight loss, etc.  So I was intrigued when I came across a statement on Tony Gentilcore's website that all women should use creatine. 

I take flax and fish oil, a multi vitamin, Vit D3, iodine and B12.  I am also having bio-identical hormone treatment for being an old lady. 

But some of the comments by the women after the article suggested that a 55 lb increase in squat weight (130 to 185) over a couple of months was due, at least in part, to using creatine.  I am contemplating getting some. 

So, if I get it, what formulation works best  - Capsules/chews/powder? 

If you use it, did you front load to raise your level and then go down to a normal dosage?

I am looking for a bit of a magic bullet here, because I feel that some of my lifts (squat and OHP) are not progressing as I would like.  So, if you stop using it , do you lose your superpowers?

I've used it for the best part of a year - it ain't no magic bullet, more a few percentage points at the margin.

Increasing calories will deliver you more results, more quickly (as well as some more muscle - probably limited in your case given age and sex - and more fat).

What program are you doing?  Some programs are going to deliver better results for your big lifts and some style of programming will you

I can provide some feedback here or you can PM me.

I took it for about 60 days back in August/September. The problem is this coincided with when I quit smoking so it's hard to know what the true impact was.

It (seemed to) help me spend longer durations in the gym and some added strength. It did lead to some water retention and my muscles got a little "pudgy".

I was a little concerned about possible health implication but after the 60 days were up I had blood work done and the "creatine"(?) levels in my blood were high but within normal limits.

I took a product called "Con-Crete" in capsule form. I didn't like the idea of mxiing a cocktail. I think within 30 days you can decide whether it helps you or not then make a decision to continue or stop.

Don't. Creatine supplements cause your body to stop producing creatine as effectively so you will become dependent on supplements and decrease your performance over time. Anything you read to the contrary is from a body-building standpoint and not from a true physiological perspective.

 

 

Original Post by courtney2163:

Don't. Creatine supplements cause your body to stop producing creatine as effectively so you will become dependent on supplements and decrease your performance over time. Anything you read to the contrary is from a body-building standpoint and not from a true physiological perspective.

 

 

huh? 

Creatine comes from two sources 1) animal protein and 2) in the absence of enough from animal protein the body produces it from amino acids. 

Prior to taking a creatine supplement you may want to increase your dietary protein intake and/or add a BCAA drink to your workouts. (and ensure you are consuming enough calories to actually build muscle).

There isn't really a danger to anything other than your pocketbook though in taking the supplement. I take it when I am in an intense muscle building phase in powder form and I do feel it helps, but it's not a magic bullet. 

I take it. I like it. I have seen some great gains but have no way of knowing whether to attribute it to my increased protein intake, the fact that I am working my butt off in the weight room, or the creatine. Some combination of all three I imagine:)

Thank you to everyone for taking the time to respond.  I ordered some in capsule form and will see whether it gives me a little boost. 

I've started taking creatine, not loading, but just taking it before my workout and it's also it my protein shakes. I've noticed a strength increase yes, but I also attribute that to raising my carb %. I have noticed a difference in recovery and workouts, I don't get a shooting pain when I'm close to the end anymore, I really feel like I could just keep going. IE Saturday - went through my whole workout, deadlifts, heavy leg work, sprinting, heavy shoulders, and one of the guys at the gym went to go do his DL, and asked if I could do it. Simply saying, I did 4 more sets with 70 pounds more than I had started off with. As far as water retention, I haven't noticed much, but I'm not loading, either. Red meat also contains natural creatine, so if you find the capsules don't work, add in more red meat.

huh?

Creatine comes from two sources 1) animal protein and 2) in the absence of enough from animal protein the body produces it from amino acids. 

Prior to taking a creatine supplement you may want to increase your dietary protein intake and/or add a BCAA drink to your workouts. (and ensure you are consuming enough calories to actually build muscle).

There isn't really a danger to anything other than your pocketbook though in taking the supplement. I take it when I am in an intense muscle building phase in powder form and I do feel it helps, but it's not a magic bullet. 

Right. Taking a creatine supplement exerts a negative feedback loop on your endogenous production of creatine, (ie. increasing intake of creatine decreases the levels your body makes). 

I never said it was dangerous, although obviously depending on the amount you are taking it can be very dangerous and put a strain on your kidneys, but rather it doesn't do your body a favor in the long run. 

Also, if you're going to be taking creatine make sure you get one that doesn't have caffeine in it. Caffeine has been shown to diminish the effects of creatinine, but its a common ingredient in supplements - _-

I take it and I like it. I find that I am able to eek out an extra rep or two when I am on it. I use powder and wash it down with water. As long as you are buying creatine monohydrate, it really doesn't matter how you take it. I went the cheapest route.

I recommend drinking a lot of water and NOT loading. Creatine can make you dehydrated especially if you are taking more than 5 grams. The first time I took it, I did the loading phase. It messed with my bowels. (If that's TMI- sorry. It's important to know.) If you load you should notice a difference in a 5-7 days. If you don't load it takes about twice that long. I think it's worth the wait. FYI, some people are non-responders.

I forgot to mention - when I used to take creatine (warning this is TMI for sure haha) my nipples got really, really sensitive. Not in a good way. If I ran with a shirt of a certain material it would be super painful. They also felt like rocks.. Like they turned into solid rock.

 

Most weird thing ever. Probably the main reason I don't mess with creatine anymore.

Original Post by lunamud:

I take it and I like it. I find that I am able to eek out an extra rep or two when I am on it. I use powder and wash it down with water. As long as you are buying creatine monohydrate, it really doesn't matter how you take it. I went the cheapest route.

I recommend drinking a lot of water and NOT loading. Creatine can make you dehydrated especially if you are taking more than 5 grams. The first time I took it, I did the loading phase. It messed with my bowels. (If that's TMI- sorry. It's important to know.) If you load you should notice a difference in a 5-7 days. If you don't load it takes about twice that long. I think it's worth the wait. FYI, some people are non-responders.

Thanks for this particular information.  That side effect would be a big problem for me, so I think I will forego the loading thing.  I drink a lot of water - about 64 to 72 ounces a day, but I also drink a lot of coffee and take psyllium, so I think I will up my water intake, also. 

Original Post by armandounc:

I forgot to mention - when I used to take creatine (warning this is TMI for sure haha) my nipples got really, really sensitive. Not in a good way. If I ran with a shirt of a certain material it would be super painful. They also felt like rocks.. Like they turned into solid rock.

 

Most weird thing ever. Probably the main reason I don't mess with creatine anymore.

That is really weird.  I can only hope that is not my experience!

Original Post by courtney2163:

Don't. Creatine supplements cause your body to stop producing creatine as effectively so you will become dependent on supplements and decrease your performance over time. Anything you read to the contrary is from a body-building standpoint and not from a true physiological perspective.

Original Post by courtney2163:

huh?

Creatine comes from two sources 1) animal protein and 2) in the absence of enough from animal protein the body produces it from amino acids. 

Prior to taking a creatine supplement you may want to increase your dietary protein intake and/or add a BCAA drink to your workouts. (and ensure you are consuming enough calories to actually build muscle).

There isn't really a danger to anything other than your pocketbook though in taking the supplement. I take it when I am in an intense muscle building phase in powder form and I do feel it helps, but it's not a magic bullet. 

Right. Taking a creatine supplement exerts a negative feedback loop on your endogenous production of creatine, (ie. increasing intake of creatine decreases the levels your body makes). 

I never said it was dangerous, although obviously depending on the amount you are taking it can be very dangerous and put a strain on your kidneys, but rather it doesn't do your body a favor in the long run. 

Also, if you're going to be taking creatine make sure you get one that doesn't have caffeine in it. Caffeine has been shown to diminish the effects of creatinine, but its a common ingredient in supplements - _-

 

[Citation needed]

You're thinking of steroids and the effect on testosterone production. The negative feedback loop you hypothesize should exist have only been theorized about by Mark Jenkins in 1998, but a review of the science literature including the supplementation examination of the British Medical Journal  shows that this hypothesis has long since been disproved.

 See for example Poortmans JR, Francaux M. Adverse effects of creatine supplementation: fact or fiction? Sports Med. 2000 Sep;30(3):155-70.

Creatine supplementation and health variables: a retrospective study.Schilling BK, Stone MH, Utter A, Kearney JT, Johnson M, Coglianese R, Smith L, O'Bryant HS, Fry AC, Starks M, Keith R, Stone ME. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Feb;33(2):183-8.

Side effects of creatine supplementation in athletes.Francaux M, Poortmans JR.Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2006 Dec;1(4):311-23. Review.

Or even the most recent one, from 2011:

Studies on the safety of creatine supplementation. Kim HJ, Kim CK, Carpentier A, Poortmans JR. Amino Acids. 2011 May;40(5):1409-18. Epub 2011 Mar 12. Review.

 At best, you're going around claiming that a long-disproven hypothesis has been validated when the opposite is true.

 Your turn. Show your work, bring your best PubMed, NEMJ, BMJ, Acta Physiologica and ACSM Journal of Sports Medicine citations, and if you've got anything that will back up your assertion that supplementation can suppress endogenous production - well, we'll take a look. But so far it looks to me like your assertion about what the "true physiological perspective" says is quite without foundation in the actual primary physiological science literature.

Original Post by armandounc:

I forgot to mention - when I used to take creatine (warning this is TMI for sure haha) my nipples got really, really sensitive. Not in a good way. If I ran with a shirt of a certain material it would be super painful. They also felt like rocks.. Like they turned into solid rock.

 

Most weird thing ever. Probably the main reason I don't mess with creatine anymore.

Both my fiance and I have this "nipple problem" when taking creatine. What gives? And does anyone know how to stop it from happening? PAINFUL!!

#16  
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I live on the stuff and it works wonders for me...powder is the way to go
Original Post by lareina:

Original Post by armandounc:

I forgot to mention - when I used to take creatine (warning this is TMI for sure haha) my nipples got really, really sensitive. Not in a good way. If I ran with a shirt of a certain material it would be super painful. They also felt like rocks.. Like they turned into solid rock.

 

Most weird thing ever. Probably the main reason I don't mess with creatine anymore.

Both my fiance and I have this "nipple problem" when taking creatine. What gives? And does anyone know how to stop it from happening? PAINFUL!!

Working of Creatine has nothing to do with the problem you've mentioned. Creatine is basically used for 2 primary reasons

1) Muscle repairing which leads to increased muscle strength

2) Increased absorption of Amino Acids which leads to an improvised muscle size

Nipples becomes sensitive when there is an increase/ imbalance in your hormones wiz, testosterone/ estrogen level. Were you or your fiance were on any such medication/ pre workout??

Nipple sensitivity can occur after the release of oxytocin, which could be caused by a variety of things.  It also can occur because of the pilomotor reflex, which causes goosebumps. I don't see why creatine would impact either of these two systems.  My point is that nipple sensitivity isn't necessarily related to estrogen or testosterone.

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