Fitness
Moderators: melkor


average time running 10 km?


Quote  |  Reply

I ran about 11km yesterday. First time running non stop that far. It took me an hour and twelve minutes. Does anyone know what is average for 10km? Curious where I fit in.

27 Replies (last)
#1  
Quote  |  Reply

For people that run alot, that's slow. (10 minute mile)  For someone just starting, it's pretty good just to be able to run that long. 

You and I are pretty much at the same speed, but I have 12 years on you.  Cool 

I have been running for almost a year now and my 10k+ (sometimes I run 12k) outside speed is an 11 minute mile.

I am 37 and 5'2" so my stride is pretty short.

I feel comfortable at this speed and don't favour pushing myself with sprints, though I'll push myself when I run 5ks, but still not sprints.  I run the stairs to get my heart rate going.

I have been running for 2 months now and I run 10 Km in about and hour.

i run a 10K in about 55 minutes...but i haven't run that far in a while, so my time is probably slower now

When I was in Highscool I played sports a lot but never really trained for a 10k.  I ran a couple of times at came out right under an hour both times.  That seems to be a pretty good midrange for someone in decent shape who's not training to race in a 10k.

#6  
Quote  |  Reply

Thanks for the replies. I'm just running for my health and because I love it! I only get out to run 2 maybe 3 times a week. I look forward to it every time. My time will get better the more I run, right?

Of course. It's really an accomplishment to be able to run that great of a distance nonstop without much serious training. Congratulations!

#8  
Quote  |  Reply

i'm 14, i've ran 10k twice and i did it in 50 minutes.

I think the average time for a 10k is probably a 10 min/mile so just over an hour.

I usually run 10k's between 50-55 minutes and I always wind up finishing just above 50%, so I'm sorta in the average....

I looked up the results of the 2008 Cotton Row Run (10K) in Huntsville, AL. 

  • It had 1600 runners
  • winner did 30:04
  • 800th place (center of pack) did 56:36
  • 1015th place did 1:00:00

When I did it (in 1988), they gave a different color of shirt to people over 1:00:00. My  wife was bummed, as she came in just over an hour. I bet that they don't do that any more.

OGR

I'd say a lot depends on whether you're racing it, or it's a training run.  For a race, I've done it in 48 minutes (should be down around 45 now).  For training, my easy pace is 6 min/km, so about 60 minutes.

Trying to push yourself harder and faster every training run is not the way to improve your times (in my experience). But you weren't looking for training advice, so I'll shut up. :)  Good job on making it to 10k non-stop!  That's a big step.  Or a lot of littler ones.

Clint

Original Post by oldguysrule:

I looked up the results of the 2008 Cotton Row Run (10K) in Huntsville, AL. 

  • It had 1600 runners
  • winner did 30:04
  • 800th place (center of pack) did 56:36
  • 1015th place did 1:00:00

When I did it (in 1988), they gave a different color of shirt to people over 1:00:00. My  wife was bummed, as she came in just over an hour. I bet that they don't do that any more.

OGR

Reading  back over this, I realized that 215 people would have crossed the finish line in a 3 1/2 minutes window. They must be using chip timing.

#13  
Quote  |  Reply

I ran 10 km a lot when I was younger but stopped for years, only got back in to it last year, my first run was 55 mins but I kept beating it every week. My brother's record was 43:30 and so I had a target to beat and brotherly competition is very good motivation. I got down to 44:20 after 1-2 months training but just couldn't seem to beat him.

I kept going, running 10 km once a week and 5 km once to twice a week. Finally after around 8 months I beat him, I ran it in 43:03 :) think that's just faster than the 10 minute mile. Its nothing compared to pro athletes though, to compete at that level you need to be doing it in 30-35 minutes, god knows how...

As you can probably tell, it's difficult to generate an "average" without doing any serious statistical research.  All we can provide is anecdotal evidence (meaning, our own personal stories).  We run the gamut in age, experience, and overall physical condition so the range will vary wildly.

I'm training for races, for example, so with my 6-mile practice run (just under 10K) from yesterday, I clocked in 51 minutes for an 8:30/mile or 5:06/km.  I vary my pace though, whether I do a straight-through run or whether I incorporate HIIT through a couple of sprint laps interspersed with walks or slow jogs.

I'm 38, male, 5'8" and I've only been seriously training regularly for about a year so compared to teen-agers who run track in school, I'm slow Smile -- but I'm also 2x - 3x their age and am much more broken down physically than they are Wink.

But compared to a lot of guys in my age group, I'm conversely a hell of a lot healthier, faster, and stronger.

In general, a 10-minute mile pace is a good marker for whether you're high or low, if you want a comparison.  That will also vary by total distance as well -- the longer your run, the slower you want to go in order to preserve energy.  For a 5K, I'll step on the gas (my last 5K practice run, I clocked in 7:44 minutes/mile; I was very happy with that), but for my long runs of 8 or more miles, I'll slow it down to about a 9:30 pace.

I ran my last 10k in around 55 minutes, and I'm not a particularly fast runner!

I'd guess the average person never runs 11k.  Just by doing so you've put yourself into an unusual group.  Well done!

Original Post by Dfish68:

I'd guess the average person never runs 11k.  Just by doing so you've put yourself into an unusual group.  Well done!

Very astute observation! :)

Be proud u did it! Speed will come as u get more comfortable. My first 10k race was over an hour. Now I hover around an hour or under depends in day haha.
I'm running my first 10k on Saturday. My best time in training has been just over 57 mins but this is going to be a hilly course so I'm expecting to come in around an hour
#20  
Quote  |  Reply

I think at the moment you are quite OK, it takes time to improve and you should increase distance and speed gradually. But after 6 months I guess you should look at minimum 45min if you train 5 times a week or 50min for 2-3 trainings a week.

27 Replies (last)
Recent Blog Post
Jamie knew that to lose weight and make a permanent change in her life, she had to take the extra steps. This meant not just working out, but eating right, and planning ahead. At first, she struggled with the new adjustments, but once she got the hang of it, she started to see real results. Now, at over 80 lbs. lost, and a year maintaining, Jamie feels more like herself than ever before.

Continue reading...