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Is it bad to do cardio everyday?


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So, I've been feeling really down on myself about my body lately. I think I might have packed on a few pounds, but I'm terrified to weigh myself. It's really disappointing that summer is right around the corner, and this is when I start to look pudgy!

I want to start doing cardio everyday (run on my elliptical for at least 30 minutes a day) and do resistance type stuff 4 times a week. I'm hoping this combined with cleaning up my diet will give me some results before July! I really want my body to be in good shape for the beach weather.

Is doing cardo everyday bad?
...and if anyone else has any suggestions on how to slim down a bit, I'll take them!

14 Replies (last)
#1  
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Doing cardio every day isn't bad at all, as long as you don't overdo it and eat properly to make up for it. 30 minutes on an elliptical is definitely a fine daily amount. I'm sure your workouts combined with healthy eating will work beautifully for summer!

#2  
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Thanks for the input!

I think all I could even pull off right about now is 30 minutes...sadly, haha.

I regularly do a few hours of Cardio/Basketball/Walking combined in a day...I eat healthy, about 6 meals per day, I also snack at times, but I work it off, and its mainly great snacks except for the odd chocolate bar, my weight goes from 148 - 153 regularly, could be water weight, I also eat a ton of raw veggies or steamed, a lot of fruits, whole grains, lean meats...eating protein and also the right carbs, does a body good.

 

The resistance is great! Doing cardio 7 days a week? You definitely need a break (at least one day). Also, I don't know your past experiences, but 30 min on the elliptical everyday may not be enough of a challenge for your body. I would definitely do different activities to mix it up. Also, if you're into workout videos, I really like Jillian Michaels. 30 day shread serously makes you sweat. :) Good luck! I truly think diet is the key to everything.

No, as long as you don't over do it. I do take one day a week off. Lets the body rest and recover which is just as important as eating right and exercising. But you don't have to lay around on your day off. Keep active in general. But I think one day off, away from a formal workout is beneficial. Especially if you do strength training, HIIT type cardio.

Everyone should do at least 30 minutes of "moderate" activity a day - so if you are walking thats great.  I used to work out daily my "rest days" of cardio would be a slow walk while my other cardio days would be interval training step aerobics elliptical and the like.

#7  
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Thanks guys.

Naturalrunner-I actually have the 30 Day Shred dvd, and just haven't used it much. Maybe I'll incorporate it into some type of workout routine.

This is what I thought of, opinions would be appreciated!

Mon- resistance workout and 30 minutes elliptical
Tues- 30 Day Shred dvd
Wedn-resistance workout and 30 minutes elliptical
Thurs-30 Day Shred dvd
Fri- resistance workout and 30 minutes elliptical
Sat- some form of cardio (kind of a rest day)
Sun- resistance workout and 30 Day Shred dvd

*note-when I say resistance workout I'm referring to a 30-40 minute workout consisting of mat exercises (crunches, planks, pushups, pilates, etc.) stability ball exercises, and lunges and squats. I also mix it up when I can.

Too much? Not enough? I'm open to making changes, I'm not good at this kind of stuff!

Here's a tip from an active learner: Fat burning really kicks into high-gear after about 20-30 minutes of continuous activity.

Try extending the amount of your workout time - it can make a difference.  Fast paced walking for an hour and a half is much more beneficial (strictly in terms of fat burning) than 20-30 minutes of pure running, then subsequently tiring out and stopping.  Short-term calorie usage (<25 min.) is derived mainly from food sources as opposed to fat stores in the body, however once you crossover into longer stretches of time, your body switches up the ratios significantly and uses more fat than before.  It's a change ranging anywhere from 20/80 to somewhere around 40/60 (ratio of fat:food calories burned during exercise) or even more.  In other words, long term exercise utilizes more fat calories per hour than short term does.

Bottom Line: Power-walking 2 miles burns the same amount of calories as running those same two miles, mathematically speaking.  It just depends on where the calories come from.  What makes the difference is the time spent.  Simple physics.  Google "running vs. walking the same distance" or something along those lines for more information if you need  better clarification.

-Current premed student

although ^ may be premed - this "fat burning zone" is bullhockey.

Yes a greater % of fat calories are burned at a slower heart rate however if you are working harder your are burning more calories and therefore more fat will too get burned

for example my heart rate monitor says at the low zone (105-121) I'll burn 60% fat calories so say I work out for  a 100 cal burn so 60 of thos cals came from fat

next 121- 139 zone so for the same time I'm going to burn 150 cals only 50% from fat guess what I've burned 75 fat cals this time

now I'm going to work super hard 40 - 157 zone going to burn 200 cals with a 40% fat burn now I've burned 80 cals from fat - and all in the same time period.

For a more detailed explanation of this check out this old thread posted on the fitenss forum FAQ linkhttp://caloriecount.about.com/heart-rate-fat- burn-zone-ft28756

 

Original Post by maverickicx:

Try extending the amount of your workout time - it can make a difference.  Fast paced walking for an hour and a half is much more beneficial (strictly in terms of fat burning) than 20-30 minutes of pure running, then subsequently tiring out and stopping.  Short-term calorie usage (<25 min.) is derived mainly from food sources as opposed to fat stores in the body, however once you crossover into longer stretches of time, your body switches up the ratios significantly and uses more fat than before.  It's a change ranging anywhere from 20/80 to somewhere around 40/60 (ratio of fat:food calories burned during exercise) or even more.  In other words, long term exercise utilizes more fat calories per hour than short term does.

The problem with this line of thinking is that it ignores the othe 23 hours in the day when you aren't exercising.  Studies have shown that higher intensity workouts result in greater fat losses (even when controled for number of calories burned.) 

Original Post by maverickicx:

-Current premed student

Well I can top this -- I work in the medical field and the surgeon I work for ran a marathon this weekend- anyway while he was training he lost over 25 lbs and he was still pretty much eating junk food 

he was running and buring lots of calories and fat along with those.

See above posts.  I personally think "premed" is like saying "I'm not a dr but I play one on TV"

 

Yeah. It pretty much does mean that :).  I'm a regular Dr. Cuddy (House reference  anybody? Yes? No?)

I put that there to show I at least had an idea or two about what I was talking about - but NOT that I'm any expert in the field (or I would've said otherwise).  Sorry if I came across as haughty or whatnot, I surely did not mean to.  (Note the "active learner" line at the beginning of my post!).

I almost prefaced this with "Now please understand, running is overall still better for you especially in the long run, but..." but sadly it's easy to backtrack in retrospect, so I won't try to make excuses after the fact (that's cheating! and I don't learn my lesson that way).

So forgive my jumping into this without proper research, the things I've said I have indeed read about before, so I swear I didn't just make them up.  They have also been working for me thus far - now to be fair, I'm 5 foot 7 inches at 155 looking to get down to 145ish quickly, and a low-cal diet plus this general training idea did the job for me very quickly.  Of course after that, I focused all my attention on high cal/ high protein diet (generally speaking) and heavy muscle training to gain weight back as muscle as opposed to fat (also a success, for months now).  So if that helps showing you where my mind was at when I shared the advice above...

As always, I am in a constant state of learning.  Next time I promise to back up my "advice" with proper sources ;)

#13  
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What the eff...

Hmm apparently a thread derail, yep.

 30 day shred - isn't that pretty brutal calisthenics? I'm wondering if that still counts as strength training for you; are there moves in there that you can't do 20 reps in a row of? If so, you're actually challenging your muscles enough that it's  strength training in itself, which would mean doing additional strength training on top of that would be overkill.

 Bodyweight-based training can take you pretty far and is a useful component in any regime, so long as you don't get too hung up on the tool and not the result you're after.

 I should probably watch the 30day Shred to see what's involved, it keeps coming up ;)

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