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Burning 1,000-1,800 calories at the gym too much?


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Hi I was wondering if it is safe to burn 1,000-1,800 calories at the gym 5-6 days a week using the machines and taking Spinning/Zumba classes?

I have been doing this for a few months and have dropped maybe two or three (because I eat 2,000-2,500) a day but now I'm finding it harder to eat less than 2,500 and have started "binging" again once a week eating 3,000-3,500 (sigh :()

Should I cut down on exercise? I'm afraid since my body is so use to the cardio I will gain weight :/ I feel energized after working out and great! It's the food cravings I cannot deal with that are making me feel discouraged and the extreme overeating on the day or two I do not exercise, any help is appreciated thanks!

14 Replies (last)

Unless you're doing 5 hour marathon workout sessions, I think you're overestimating your calorie burn.

Original Post by cellophane_star:

Unless you're doing 5 hour marathon workout sessions, I think you're overestimating your calorie burn.

I don't think so, I go by what the machines say which ask me for my weight and age and this website says for other activities such as Zumba, Kickboxing, Pilates, etc.

I also go by my heart rate, I keep it between 160-180, I usually work out for 90-120 minutes.

For instance, I may burn 400 on one machine, then do a Zumba class which is about 350, then do the stairmaster which is 200 and then maybe walk on the treadmill on an incline for another 200.

Machines are notoriously inaccurate regarding calorie burn, even if they ask for your height and weight.

I personally think all of that is unnecessary, unless you really enjoy doing so much back-to-back. Why not take a Zumba class one day, stairmaster the next, treadmill the day after that and then another machine the day after that.

If you really enjoy doing that much activity all at once, just make sure you're eating enough to have no greater than a 1,000 calorie deficit.

Original Post by bierorama:

Machines are notoriously inaccurate regarding calorie burn, even if they ask for your height and weight.

I personally think all of that is unnecessary, unless you really enjoy doing so much back-to-back. Why not take a Zumba class one day, stairmaster the next, treadmill the day after that and then another machine the day after that.

If you really enjoy doing that much activity all at once, just make sure you're eating enough to have no greater than a 1,000 calorie deficit.

I've heard about that! I was thinking of getting the Polar FT60 heart rate monitor! I'm afraid of eating too much so I feel guilty if I don't burn 1,000 plus at the gym even if it's off by 100-200 since it's not the most accurate for the machines, I think it's just a habit now really.

Don't trust what the machines report for calorie burn.  There is no regulatory or industry standard for accuracy that they have to meet.  There is a commercial incentive to report high so that users think "wow, what a great machine to use, look at all those calories I burn on it".  If the machine monitors your heart rate in addition to using your height and weight, it could be more accurate, but not necessarily.

Consider that if you are actually burning 1,000-1,800 cal/day and eating 2,000-2,500/day, your net caloric deficit would be something like 1,000-1,500 cal/day and you'd have dropped almost 2 lbs/week for at least the first few weeks.   But you didn't, so in all likelihood, you aren't.

 

Original Post by john_liu:

Don't trust what the machines report for calorie burn.  There is no regulatory or industry standard for accuracy that they have to meet.  There is a commercial incentive to report high so that users think "wow, what a great machine to use, look at all those calories I burn on it".  If the machine monitors your heart rate in addition to using your height and weight, it could be more accurate, but not necessarily.

Consider that if you are actually burning 1,000-1,800 cal/day and eating 2,000-2,500/day, your net caloric deficit would be something like 1,000-1,500 cal/day and you'd have dropped almost 2 lbs/week for at least the first few weeks.   But you didn't, so in all likelihood, you aren't.

 

Or course not because once or twice a week I eat 3,000-3,500 calories a day lol and without any exercise I only maintain on 1,900 calories! I also go by my heart rate, if it's too "easy" then I know I have to push it os my heart rate is 160-180 to see an effect.

My concern is the binge eating once or twice a week, I would like to tone up more so I need a bigger deficit but it is setting me back.

IMHO the amount you burn is just fine, I know I can burn 1200 cals with back to back spin classes (that is measured by a HR monitor).  As for the eating you might want to try eating a serving of protein and a serving of carbs within 20 minutes of finishing at the gym.  The protein to feed your lean muscle mass and the carbs to stave off hunger until you can sit down for a meal.

You may also keep in mind that you might be more dehydrated then you think and so it really is not hunger you are feeling, but you are thirsty and need water.

Good Luck to you

 

 

do you ever hold the rails while on these machines? If you hold the rails even if your heartrate is up you can go ahead and cut the machine calculated  burn by half. These machines while not accurate to start with, only "work" if you are holding ALL your body weight yourself; holding the rails decreases this.

Also if you are doing the same workout every day... cardio machine then Zumba your body can get used to it which decreases its calorie burning efficency.

Even if you are burning the number of calories you think you are you may be underestimating your intake. Working out does not erase all sins, you need to be doing both in moderation, not working out and eating whatever you want to extremes.

You body wont gain weight just because you have stopped working out, as long as you start decreasing the number of calories you intake.

Weaning yourself off bad foods like sugar and cookies is hard (I know) because they have addictive qualities, try to eat a little less of them each day until your cravings for them subside or at least become manageable.

Buring a lot is reasonable but you would have seen better results, based on what you eat, and burn. Try and reevaluate which one (or both) isnt as accurate as you think it is to get back on track

If you feel hungry its your body telling you it needs food. So eat.

Well done though you must be super fit to keep up with all that exercise
Original Post by imia345:

My concern is the binge eating once or twice a week, I would like to tone up more so I need a bigger deficit but it is setting me back.

If you really want to "tone up" and lose more body fat, you would be better off with a small deficit, not more than 300 cals and a full body lifting program using heavy weights.  It looks to me like all your workouts are cardio, which won't help you with the "toning" thing.

http://nerdfitness.com/blog/2011/07/21/meet-s taci-your-new-powerlifting-super-hero/

Check out this girl's story :)

Original Post by imia345:
My concern is the binge eating once or twice a week, I would like to tone up more so I need a bigger deficit but it is setting me back.

Keep a smaller deficit and lift weights to a) not binge b) "tone" up and c) lose weight healthily.

Hello, buringing a 1000 plus calories a day is a lot. When I find myself in the gym that much and for that long it is because I feel motivated to burn the extra calories I am eating or drinking. 80% of weight maintanence  and loss is with regards to calorie consumption and food choices. For myself I need more work on eating healthy foods in the right quantities consistently. When I'm doing that, I find myself in the gym less.

Good Luck to you. Wink

Original Post by bloming:

do you ever hold the rails while on these machines? If you hold the rails even if your heartrate is up you can go ahead and cut the machine calculated  burn by half. These machines while not accurate to start with, only "work" if you are holding ALL your body weight yourself; holding the rails decreases this.

Also if you are doing the same workout every day... cardio machine then Zumba your body can get used to it which decreases its calorie burning efficency.

Even if you are burning the number of calories you think you are you may be underestimating your intake. Working out does not erase all sins, you need to be doing both in moderation, not working out and eating whatever you want to extremes.

You body wont gain weight just because you have stopped working out, as long as you start decreasing the number of calories you intake.

Weaning yourself off bad foods like sugar and cookies is hard (I know) because they have addictive qualities, try to eat a little less of them each day until your cravings for them subside or at least become manageable.

Buring a lot is reasonable but you would have seen better results, based on what you eat, and burn. Try and reevaluate which one (or both) isnt as accurate as you think it is to get back on track

That's true! I notice it gets easier and easier and burning "600" calories feels like nothing! I hope my body isn't too use to exercise! However, I do need to cut back on the carbs, I never overeat on raw almonds, vegetables/fruit, only pita chips! (I can eat the whole bag which is 8 servings! :/) and Ben and Jerry's (sigh!)

Original Post by tina0367:

Original Post by imia345:

My concern is the binge eating once or twice a week, I would like to tone up more so I need a bigger deficit but it is setting me back.

If you really want to "tone up" and lose more body fat, you would be better off with a small deficit, not more than 300 cals and a full body lifting program using heavy weights.  It looks to me like all your workouts are cardio, which won't help you with the "toning" thing.

http://nerdfitness.com/blog/2011/07/21/meet-s taci-your-new-powerlifting-super-hero/

Check out this girl's story :)

Thanks, I'll try for a smaller deficit and more lifting!

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