Fitness
Moderators: melkor


How many calories does HIIT Burn per cycle?


Quote  |  Reply

Hi, I know there are other HIIT posts, but I haven't seen this question/answer yet.

Has anyone with a pretty accurate heart rate monitor done HIIT and saw how many calories it burned? I ask because the only thing I can find in CC for the activity log is "Jog/Walk combination" and I know for sure this is not jogging/walking lol.

If you have an answer, please provide your stats. I'm 5' 4", 137ish, so of course I would need to account for whatever weight differences.

It's okay if I don't get an accurate answer. I just want to plan my deficit accordingly.

Thanks.

12 Replies (last)

hey there....I just did what I would considered HIIT the other night for 21 min and burn 138cals. I am 5'3.5'' and 141lbs.

it was 30sec of work and 10 sec rest consisting of 4 exercises of rounds of 6. It is acutally about 16min of HIIT, however I did a little warm up for about 5 min beforehand.

Hope it helps!

I know you're looking for accuracy, so this may not help.

I do 15 second with a 45 second rest for about 18 minutes, but I usually log it as the time I spent sprinting(4.5 minutes) plus the time I spent fast-jogging (13.5 minutes). That way I know the minimum # of calories I burnt, and the bonus cals burnt and metabolism boost from alternating them is just something I'm smug about. As long as the minimum is enough for my weightloss, I know for sure that the extra is helping speed things along.

Original Post by makinitcount44:

hey there....I just did what I would considered HIIT the other night for 21 min and burn 138cals. I am 5'3.5'' and 141lbs.

it was 30sec of work and 10 sec rest consisting of 4 exercises of rounds of 6. It is acutally about 16min of HIIT, however I did a little warm up for about 5 min beforehand.

Hope it helps!

Actually if you are doing a round of Tabata intervals correctly, it is supposed 20 seconds on and 10 off for 8 sets. Comes out to 4 minutes. If you in really good shape, you can do multiple rounds of Tabata. You do a round, take 60 seconds rest, do another round, take 60 seconds rest, etc.. However, most people aren't ready to start out with Tabata. It is better to work your way up to that. If you are new to HIIT, use a 1:3 work/rest ratio (ex - 15/45). Then move up to a 1:2, a 1:1 and eventually Tabata.

** What I started doing recently incorporating all three work/rest ratios into my HIIT session. After a warm up, I will do as many 20/20 sets as I can. I can usually keep this pace for 8-10 minutes before I am feeling dead..LOL Then I start doing 20/40's. Then when I am practically ready to stop, I will let my HR drop to 70% before I sprint. This usually works out to 90-120 secs rest. Since I am resting longer, I do 30 sec sprints. I don't usually recommend or even like doing 30 sec sprints because you lose intensity after 20 secs or so. However, since the rest periods are longer at the end, I sprint for longer. It is really brutal combining all of them and I have been seeing some great results from it.

To the OP - In regards to calorie burn, you have to remember that the benefit of doing HIIT is how many calories you are burning through out the day after you finish. Your initial calorie burn will be somewhat low since you are going for a shorter duration. However, since you are working considerably harder in an HIIT session, your body has to work harder to recover causing the extended spike in your metabolism.

I don't know if this is the best way to do it, but yesterday I did intervals (I would probably call them moderate intensity and not high intensity. I'm just not able to do true HIIT yet) with lap swimming. 25 yds as fast and hard as I can go, and then 25 to 50 yds (depending on how quickly I felt recovered enough to "sprint" again) at a slower pace. I did it for 30 min and logged it as 15 min vigorous effort and 15 min moderate effort. I plan on buying a hrm in the next few weeks though, so if I figure out this mystery I will definately tell you!

However, as vyperman said, its more about how many calories you are burning after. I can definately say that ever since friday when I started doing these swimming intervals, my heart rate has felt elevated and I've lost weight despite eating more than usual. I know seeing the actual calories burned can be motivating, but I would bet that its safe to say that as long as you keep up with what you're doing you'll be making progress.

Good luck!

(Edited to Add) btw, vyperman, thanks for convincing me to try interval training its really helping. Hopefully I'll be able to work my way up to true HIIT soon.

Original Post by danaofdoom: ...

(Edited to Add) btw, vyperman, thanks for convincing me to try interval training its really helping. Hopefully I'll be able to work my way up to true HIIT soon.

I second this, doing my old HIIT method didn't help nearly as much as the revised version vyperman advised for me. I've already lost poundage since then, and the slight fat loss around my stomach and in my face is actually noticeable. Very cool, many thanks :)

Original Post by vyperman7:

Original Post by makinitcount44:

hey there....I just did what I would considered HIIT the other night for 21 min and burn 138cals. I am 5'3.5'' and 141lbs.

it was 30sec of work and 10 sec rest consisting of 4 exercises of rounds of 6. It is acutally about 16min of HIIT, however I did a little warm up for about 5 min beforehand.

Hope it helps!

Actually if you are doing a round of Tabata intervals correctly, it is supposed 20 seconds on and 10 off for 8 sets. Comes out to 4 minutes. If you in really good shape, you can do multiple rounds of Tabata. You do a round, take 60 seconds rest, do another round, take 60 seconds rest, etc.. However, most people aren't ready to start out with Tabata. It is better to work your way up to that. If you are new to HIIT, use a 1:3 work/rest ratio (ex - 15/45). Then move up to a 1:2, a 1:1 and eventually Tabata.

** What I started doing recently incorporating all three work/rest ratios into my HIIT session. After a warm up, I will do as many 20/20 sets as I can. I can usually keep this pace for 8-10 minutes before I am feeling dead..LOL Then I start doing 20/40's. Then when I am practically ready to stop, I will let my HR drop to 70% before I sprint. This usually works out to 90-120 secs rest. Since I am resting longer, I do 30 sec sprints. I don't usually recommend or even like doing 30 sec sprints because you lose intensity after 20 secs or so. However, since the rest periods are longer at the end, I sprint for longer. It is really brutal combining all of them and I have been seeing some great results from it.

To the OP - In regards to calorie burn, you have to remember that the benefit of doing HIIT is how many calories you are burning through out the day after you finish. Your initial calorie burn will be somewhat low since you are going for a shorter duration. However, since you are working considerably harder in an HIIT session, your body has to work harder to recover causing the extended spike in your metabolism.

 Okay, that was helpful. I heard about the whole afterburn, and I did this HIIT on the same day I lifted weights...as a poster suggested...maybe it was you vyperman.

The 20:20 version looks really hard for me right now. I did 15:45 and I could only go 4 cycles! It was tough! I warmed up for 5 minutes, did the cycles for 4 minutes, and cooled down for 5 minutes. Then I walked a couple laps and did it over again (warmup, cycle, cool down).

I was just wondering how to log it because I did it on a track, and CC's highest running estimate is like 10mph, and I was going way faster than that. I calculated I was going a little less than 13mph on my sprint (based off of distance/time), and maybe 4.3 mph on the jog. I just logged the 6.5mph running twice to account for going twice as fast?

But is there any way to know how many extra calories we burn throughout the day based on this? I'm just curious.

Original Post by beijingbelle:

Original Post by danaofdoom: ...

(Edited to Add) btw, vyperman, thanks for convincing me to try interval training its really helping. Hopefully I'll be able to work my way up to true HIIT soon.

I second this, doing my old HIIT method didn't help nearly as much as the revised version vyperman advised for me. I've already lost poundage since then, and the slight fat loss around my stomach and in my face is actually noticeable. Very cool, many thanks :)

 What is the routine you do now?

Original Post by danaofdoom:

I don't know if this is the best way to do it, but yesterday I did intervals (I would probably call them moderate intensity and not high intensity. I'm just not able to do true HIIT yet) with lap swimming. 25 yds as fast and hard as I can go, and then 25 to 50 yds (depending on how quickly I felt recovered enough to "sprint" again) at a slower pace. I did it for 30 min and logged it as 15 min vigorous effort and 15 min moderate effort. I plan on buying a hrm in the next few weeks though, so if I figure out this mystery I will definately tell you!

However, as vyperman said, its more about how many calories you are burning after. I can definately say that ever since friday when I started doing these swimming intervals, my heart rate has felt elevated and I've lost weight despite eating more than usual. I know seeing the actual calories burned can be motivating, but I would bet that its safe to say that as long as you keep up with what you're doing you'll be making progress.

Good luck!

(Edited to Add) btw, vyperman, thanks for convincing me to try interval training its really helping. Hopefully I'll be able to work my way up to true HIIT soon.

No problem Dana.

I am happy to hear that it is working for you. The only thing you have to remember is not to overdo it. One problem I have run into with people new to HIIT, is that they end up wanting to do it every time they do cardio, or at the very least more than 3x per week. Any type of interval training whether it is regular or HIIT should only be done at the most 3x per week and with at least 48 hours in between sessions since it is more taxing on the body. Once again though, it is great to hear that it is working for you. :)

By the way, I really liked hearing your experience with it in the pool. The two ways I haven't tried HIIT yet are with a heavy bag and in the pool.

Original Post by beijingbelle:

I second this, doing my old HIIT method didn't help nearly as much as the revised version vyperman advised for me. I've already lost poundage since then, and the slight fat loss around my stomach and in my face is actually noticeable. Very cool, many thanks :)

 Very cool to hear! I am happy that it is working out for you.

Just make sure to change your interval scheme when a 1:3 starts to get too easy for you. If you do HIIT consistently 2-3 times per week, a 1:3 will start to get easier in a month or two. Then start doing a 1:2. However, one thing I have noticed with HIIT is that all methods aren't created equal in terms of the exercise you use to do it with. For example, you could use an elliptical and get to 20 minutes of intervals with a 1:2 work/rest ratio. Then you move over to something else like running sprints, a jump rope, a body weight circuit, etc and you will feel like it is the first time you have done HIIT.

Original Post by tikiremy:

 Okay, that was helpful. I heard about the whole afterburn, and I did this HIIT on the same day I lifted weights...as a poster suggested...maybe it was you vyperman.

The 20:20 version looks really hard for me right now. I did 15:45 and I could only go 4 cycles! It was tough! I warmed up for 5 minutes, did the cycles for 4 minutes, and cooled down for 5 minutes. Then I walked a couple laps and did it over again (warmup, cycle, cool down).

I was just wondering how to log it because I did it on a track, and CC's highest running estimate is like 10mph, and I was going way faster than that. I calculated I was going a little less than 13mph on my sprint (based off of distance/time), and maybe 4.3 mph on the jog. I just logged the 6.5mph running twice to account for going twice as fast?

But is there any way to know how many extra calories we burn throughout the day based on this? I'm just curious.

No worries.  I am happy that I was able to help. Yeah I am the one who recommended doing it after lifting. It definitely isn't a method a lot of people use because of how tired you get from lifting. However, if you change up your lifting a bit, you can accommodate HIIT and still get in all the lifting elements you would lifting 3x per week on a full body plan for the most part.

Since you could only go for 4 cycles using a 1:3, stick with that for now. You want to keep using it until you can do 20 minutes worth of intervals. Once you can do that, move to a 1:2 (20/40). Once you can do 20 minutes with that, pick a new way of doing HIIT. I have been doing HIIT for awhile now so that is why I keep creating all these new ways to try it. However, for someone new to HIIT, you will be to move onto different methods and stick with them for awhile. You could do a body weight circuit in which you choose four different exercises (burpee, mountain climber, squat jump, knee ups) and do 20 on and 60 off, you could do sprints outside, etc..

With the body weight circuit (which I do a version of, but not HIIT), what does it mean when you say "20 on and 60 off?" What's considered on and what do I do on the off time?

I would like to try to do HIIT swimming, and body weight circuit too, because I get bored really easily and I love to swim. Plus, I wish I could run somewhere where no one is looking at how fast I'm going. I hate the attention of sprinting when everyone else is jogging. Too much pressure for some reason. Now, if I went outside on a track, oh I would love that! But...that won't be for some months from now, sadly...too cold and snowy here.

Original Post by tikiremy:

With the body weight circuit (which I do a version of, but not HIIT), what does it mean when you say "20 on and 60 off?" What's considered on and what do I do on the off time?

I would like to try to do HIIT swimming, and body weight circuit too, because I get bored really easily and I love to swim. Plus, I wish I could run somewhere where no one is looking at how fast I'm going. I hate the attention of sprinting when everyone else is jogging. Too much pressure for some reason. Now, if I went outside on a track, oh I would love that! But...that won't be for some months from now, sadly...too cold and snowy here.

After a warm up choose an exercise like burpees for example. Do as many burpees as you can in 20 seconds. Go hard and fast at full intensity. It doesn't really matter what you do during that 60 seconds. It is primarily intended to get your HR back down. So you can walk around, stand there trying to catch your breath, etc... Then move onto the next exercise which could be mountain climbers. Do the same thing. Then you could choose squat jumps, etc..

You can apply the principles of HIIT to any type of exercise you do. That is the beauty of it.

I hear what you are saying about sprinting. I have never really had that problem though. I could personally care less about what people think when I am exercising in public. It is funny because I train my mom 3x per week and I was finally able to convince her to try actual sprints outside. She gets really nervous about people watching. However, she pulled through. She hated me the day after because of how sore she was from it. She loved the workout it gave her though. Sprinting is actually the best way to do HIIT IMO. When you combine that with the workout it gives your whole core, it is fantastic. Still though, that is only one option and there are tons of ways to do it.

vyperman, you should definately try swimming. Its easy to switch between fast and slow, there's no stress on your joints, and it works every muscle group. Also, the fact that you can't breath normally increases your heart rate. Its probably the only cardio I actually enjoy.

12 Replies
Recent Blog Post
What would you do if your health medications were no longer effective and your future health didn't seem so positive? Patti took charge. At 238 pounds, she decided to start eating better and moving around more. Guess what? She lost 113 pounds and reached her goal weight. At 137 pounds she is now happier than ever and helping others reach their ultimate level of health, too.  

Continue reading...