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What does it take to be considered an athlete?


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Hey i was just wondering what exactly does someone have to do daily to be considered an athlete because people are always saying that because some one is an athlete that they should be eating WAY more calories than others. But athletes depending on the team sometimes only have practice and games 3-4/week whereas some people work out everyday and no one is telling them that they are athletes and to eat more. So i guess what i was wondering is if you just work out 3-4 days a week burning about 400 cals each workout session (about the same as you would at an average practice depepnding on the sport) would you consider yourself an "athlete" and eat more daily?
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1600 calories burned a week then?   Thats nothin.  

i actually have been feeling kind of shafted myself in the nomenclature department.  for me i feel like i don't have a name.  i'm not "a runner" bec i don't go on the treadmill or run outside.  i'm not "a swimmer."   i'm not "a biker" or "a spinner" bec i don't use the exercise bike or bike outside.  i'm not "a bodybuilder" or "weightlifter" bec i'm still sort of new to the whole thing and my form's not wonderful.

but i exercise for hours every day at the gym and i'd venture to suggest that i exercise more than most pro-athletes (except for maybe at the peak of their season).  so where's my athletic title?  i know it sounds ridiculous, but i honestly do wish i had one (i do the arc trainer, which is sort of like an elliptical; and i weight lift for 30-45 min a day)

#3  
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So you "exercise regularly". Do you need a title?

As for the eating more daily: there is no magical amount of exercises where if you do less you eat your regular intake, and a minute more and you can double your intake. If you are more active, you can eat more, in proportion to how much more active you are. It sounds like the athletes you are talking about are called that by hobby/profession, not amount of activity. If you're burning 1600 cals/week, you can eat 1600 cals/week more than if you weren't burning them, whether you want to call yourself an athlete, couch potato, ... or tightrope walker :)

to answer flowerbud's question, do i need a title?  no.

would i like a title?  yes. 

#5  
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:)

Then I call you an Arc Trainerer! Or Arc-er for short :)
It takes an attitude and work. Your mind set and activity makes you an athlete. Even challenged people like in the special olympics are athletes. If your just starting, your an athlete in training. Cheers

M
Original Post by caloriecountingme:

but i exercise for hours every day at the gym and i'd venture to suggest that i exercise more than most pro-athletes (except for maybe at the peak of their season).  so where's my athletic title?  i know it sounds ridiculous, but i honestly do wish i had one (i do the arc trainer, which is sort of like an elliptical; and i weight lift for 30-45 min a day)

 

I would say to an extent, those of us working out 5 or more times a week are athletes in a way, but we are nothing near pros! That is okay because we are not paid to workout. It is my understanding that pros workout 4+ hours a day, 5+ days a week....I don't know anyone who works out over 20 hours a week!
#8  
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I think to be considered an athlete you have to work out 5-6 days a week, and 3+ hours on those days. Working out includes weights, conditioning, and practice.. and "games" or "events" if you're really active within them.

That's just my personal definition.

And yeah, as someone mentioned... pro athletes get paid to stay in shape, and eat right, and to practice. That must be nice. lol
I work out on the swim team for 2-3 hours a day and I'm in highschool, therefore I see myself as a young athlete.
To me, refering to someone as an athlete implies that they compete in a sport.  They don't have to be a professional to be an athlete.  If you are a swimmer and you compete in swim meets you are an athlete.  Unfortunately if you are an Arc Trainer and there are no Arc Trainer competetions then you are not an athlete.  But you are athletic.

But whether you are an athele, athletic, or sedentary you still only eat what you burn calories wise to maintain. 
Trhawley, that is a good point - we can be athletic without being official athletes.  That is a great way for us to think of ourselves....so for those of us who want titles, we can be "athletic gals" and "athletic guys"!
sorry if "athletic gal" doesn't have the same appeal to me as it does others.  as you mentioned, trhawley, competitions in gym equipment don't exist.  *sigh*  i'm still trying to get over it.
I was refering to the definition of the word "athlete" as it is commonly used in print and conversation but as far as I am concerned, caloriecountingme, if you are on your Arc Trainer for "hours every day" then you my friend are an athlete.  And fwiw, a gym I used to work out in years ago had an exercise bike race once (I participated) so gym equipment competitions, although rare, do exist.  I recommend that you form an Arc Trainer League and organize some events.  An Arc Trainer Trophy would look nice on your mantle wouldn't it?

(If any of your friends are wondering what to get you for Christmas just have them ask me.)

trhawley, you're quite kind!  i appreciate your recognizing my hard work.  and even if you're poking fun at me, it's quite all right.  an arc trainer league, you say?   i wonder who we could get to sponsor team parties...

i'll let the buddies know that you're the christmas present go-to.  thanks.

Perhaps the American Red Cross would agree to be your sponsor.  However, everyone would have to donate a pint of blood at the end of the competition.
great!  that would give us an excuse to EAT.  and, we could recruit a protein powder company to restore our muscles after our charitable deed.  maybe one w/some carbs, like the new designer whey for women or optislim or something...

On my scales ( so obviously its 100% right :) ) they say that an athlete is someone who has a resting heart rate of under 60 bpm, and high intensity workouts at least 12 hours a week.
 By this definition alone i am an athlete :D so that's the one im sticking to :D 

For the arc trainer league, why not make it a charity event?

We recently had a spin-a-thon for diabetes so you could have an arc-a-thon for the heart and stroke foundation, or whoever you choose... maybe to raise money for the food bank? Just like the Terry Fox runs (if anyone outside of Canada has those?)

Original Post by caloriecountingme:

sorry if "athletic gal" doesn't have the same appeal to me as it does others.  as you mentioned, trhawley, competitions in gym equipment don't exist.  *sigh*  i'm still trying to get over it.

They have competitions on incline treadmill. One is called the "Trail Runner, incline treadmill challenge" and the official comps are at trade shows. The treadmill is set at 15% incline (the steepest most brands go to), and you go for 15 minutes. You can adjust the speed up/down as you go, but the incline must stay fixed at 15. Most people start slow and speed up throughout.

You could always start an arctrainer competition thread here on CC. Lots of people are using that machine. I hope that you are using the version without handles.

 

My definition of “athlete” depends, in part, on how much you care about your performance. Some people would also add that you have to actually compete at something. Personally, I don’t require that second one, because there are some very intense, but non-competitive sports/activities that people train very hard to do well.

If you are an athlete, you are “training” for something, not just exercising. Each workout/exercise has a purpose. If a person spends 3 hours a day on an elliptical, just so they can eat more, and still lose some weight, I don’t call them an athlete. An athlete could be doing that same workout though, as part of a planned program to achieve specific performance goals.

In my experience, this is the definition of “athlete” that Dr’s, surgeons, and physical therapists use to decide how aggressively to treat your specific problems. If you really care about your sport, they will be more willing to operate or try serious procedures. Otherwise, you could go with a less serious repair/procedure/therapy and maybe switch to a different sport/activity.

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