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what constitutes strength training???!


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Hey everyone, quick question, does pilates, barre workouts, or yoga count as strength training? I hate weights, just a personal preference, and love the other stuff. I do a ton of cardio but am looking to add more strength training into my schedule. Thanks in advance for any help!
18 Replies (last)

No, those are not strength training.

 

In my opinion those are "stetching" exercises and have nothing to do with strength. 

Maybe try a bodyweight metabolic workout - push ups, burpees, chin ups, planks squats, lunges a couple days a week and then do your other stuff too.

Strength training is a pretty broad category.  I don't know about Pilates or Barre but Yoga will typically have some strength elements to it.  You can definitely get a good strength workout using only body weight.

I'm very familiar with Pilates, not so much the barre workouts. I consider Pilates 'strength training', as in I've built up strength and muscle mass using my own body weight as resistance. However its not much compared to say, a fitness model, but its the right amount of strength and muscle mass for me. Standard weight lifting with free weights can build bigger muscles in a short amount of time (10 minutes of lifting heavy yields better results that 40 minutes of steady state cardio in terms of body comp.), but I find it incredibly boring so I do the bare minimum just to get the shoulders I want.

Some people (a lot of people) on this website swear by the New Rules for Lifting method, and are fervent in their belief that NRFL is the only true path to strength training. Much like p90x, the fans are rabid in their proselytizing.

Whatever you decide to do, just do it because you like it. You'll get more out of an exercise you like, and do consistently, rather than force yourself into doing something that bores you. 

If you're interested in exploring Pilates further, or perhaps mixing it up with HITT/body pump elements, check out this blog for videos, ideas, routines, etc etc. I've been a dedicated fan since Jan. 2011, and along with a good diet, its really given me the body I want (lean, "dancer-esque", flexible, good posture, etc).

While you may see some strength increases from those if you're completely new to them, they aren't the most efficient forms of strength training.

As I suggested in another topic this morning, I recommend reading the Wikipedia page on strength training. (I know, Wiki isn't the best source but I think the info on this page is really good!)

Original Post by vonapathy:

Some people (a lot of people) on this website swear by the New Rules for Lifting method, and are fervent in their belief that NRFL is the only true path to strength training. Much like p90x, the fans are rabid in their proselytizing.

Hmm, I haven't come across anyone who claims this on CC.  There are many of us who have had good experiences with the various programs, but nearly all of us have done other weight lifting programs with good results.  It saddens me that you read into our recommendation of the programs as rabid proselytizing.

If a person can get the results they want from non-weights-based strength training, great.  Stick with the minimum effort necessary by all means (and I'm not being sarcastic, I truly mean that).  If you enjoy what you're doing and are pleased with the results, again, great - I don't think anyone here is going to tell you to do something different.  However, to answer a question about strength training and not point out that weights may be essential for progression to get the results someone wants is just silly, IMO.

caseylou: Here is a strong and flexible dancer. (Capoeira and slow-motion breakdancing?).

There are plenty of bodyweight exercises that build strength. You just work your way through harder and harder variations as your strength improves.

 

 

 

Original Post by awestendorf:

Original Post by vonapathy:

Some people (a lot of people) on this website swear by the New Rules for Lifting method, and are fervent in their belief that NRFL is the only true path to strength training. Much like p90x, the fans are rabid in their proselytizing.

Hmm, I haven't come across anyone who claims this on CC.  There are many of us who have had good experiences with the various programs, but nearly all of us have done other weight lifting programs with good results.  It saddens me that you read into our recommendation of the programs as rabid proselytizing.

If a person can get the results they want from non-weights-based strength training, great.  Stick with the minimum effort necessary by all means (and I'm not being sarcastic, I truly mean that).  If you enjoy what you're doing and are pleased with the results, again, great - I don't think anyone here is going to tell you to do something different.  However, to answer a question about strength training and not point out that weights may be essential for progression to get the results someone wants is just silly, IMO.

It should be noted that 90% of my post should be read with a heavy dose of snark, sarcasm, and toung-in-cheek-ness. I don't literally believe that the followers of NRFL (and p90x) are rabid proselytizers, I just like to take little jabs at them cause its fun. If the most popular form of exercise on this website was....spinning or yoga, I'd be treating those the same level of snarkiness.

TL;DR version: I'm a sarcastic **** who likes to poke fun at popular things. no harm meant.

Original Post by vonapathy:
It should be noted that 90% of my post should be read with a heavy dose of snark, sarcasm, and toung-in-cheek-ness. I don't literally believe that the followers of NRFL (and p90x) are rabid proselytizers, I just like to take little jabs at them cause its fun. If the most popular form of exercise on this website was....spinning or yoga, I'd be treating those the same level of snarkiness.

TL;DR version: I'm a sarcastic **** who likes to poke fun at popular things. no harm meant.

Gotcha, and good to know - no offense taken, I just didn't want the OP  to get the wrong idea about it :)  We're only mildly rabid, after all!

Original Post by awestendorf:

Original Post by vonapathy:

Some people (a lot of people) on this website swear by the New Rules for Lifting method, and are fervent in their belief that NRFL is the only true path to strength training. Much like p90x, the fans are rabid in their proselytizing.

Hmm, I haven't come across anyone who claims this on CC.  There are many of us who have had good experiences with the various programs, but nearly all of us have done other weight lifting programs with good results.  It saddens me that you read into our recommendation of the programs as rabid proselytizing.

If a person can get the results they want from non-weights-based strength training, great.  Stick with the minimum effort necessary by all means (and I'm not being sarcastic, I truly mean that).  If you enjoy what you're doing and are pleased with the results, again, great - I don't think anyone here is going to tell you to do something different.  However, to answer a question about strength training and not point out that weights may be essential for progression to get the results someone wants is just silly, IMO.

The bolded above leads me to believe you have little or no understanding of body weight based training.  As someone who does both free weights and yoga believe me when I say that not all the hard work is being done in the weight room.

Original Post by trh:

Original Post by awestendorf:

Original Post by vonapathy:

Some people (a lot of people) on this website swear by the New Rules for Lifting method, and are fervent in their belief that NRFL is the only true path to strength training. Much like p90x, the fans are rabid in their proselytizing.

Hmm, I haven't come across anyone who claims this on CC.  There are many of us who have had good experiences with the various programs, but nearly all of us have done other weight lifting programs with good results.  It saddens me that you read into our recommendation of the programs as rabid proselytizing.

If a person can get the results they want from non-weights-based strength training, great.  Stick with the minimum effort necessary by all means (and I'm not being sarcastic, I truly mean that).  If you enjoy what you're doing and are pleased with the results, again, great - I don't think anyone here is going to tell you to do something different.  However, to answer a question about strength training and not point out that weights may be essential for progression to get the results someone wants is just silly, IMO.

The bolded above leads me to believe you have little or no understanding of body weight based training.  As someone who does both free weights and yoga believe me when I say that not all the hard work is being done in the weight room.

All I meant by that statement was don't progress (for example) to weights if you're happy with the results from other strength training.  Clearly there are other ways to progress and that was not meant as an insinuation that cardio or non-weights-based strength training is easy or can't be progressive.

Original Post by awestendorf:

Original Post by trh:

Original Post by awestendorf:

Original Post by vonapathy:

Some people (a lot of people) on this website swear by the New Rules for Lifting method, and are fervent in their belief that NRFL is the only true path to strength training. Much like p90x, the fans are rabid in their proselytizing.

Hmm, I haven't come across anyone who claims this on CC.  There are many of us who have had good experiences with the various programs, but nearly all of us have done other weight lifting programs with good results.  It saddens me that you read into our recommendation of the programs as rabid proselytizing.

If a person can get the results they want from non-weights-based strength training, great.  Stick with the minimum effort necessary by all means (and I'm not being sarcastic, I truly mean that).  If you enjoy what you're doing and are pleased with the results, again, great - I don't think anyone here is going to tell you to do something different.  However, to answer a question about strength training and not point out that weights may be essential for progression to get the results someone wants is just silly, IMO.

The bolded above leads me to believe you have little or no understanding of body weight based training.  As someone who does both free weights and yoga believe me when I say that not all the hard work is being done in the weight room.

All I meant by that statement was don't progress (for example) to weights if you're happy with the results from other strength training.  Clearly there are other ways to progress and that was not meant as an insinuation that cardio or non-weights-based strength training is easy or can't be progressive.

Sorry, I took it to mean anything "non-weights", not using barbells, dumbells, etc., was a "minimum effort" workout.

#13  
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Thanks everyone. Blaaahhhh, I hate weights! Guess I have to suck it up though.
Original Post by caseylou2:

Thanks everyone. Blaaahhhh, I hate weights! Guess I have to suck it up though.

What have you done with weights in the past? Perhaps a different program might make it less of a bore.

Original Post by amethystgirl:

Original Post by caseylou2:

Thanks everyone. Blaaahhhh, I hate weights! Guess I have to suck it up though.

What have you done with weights in the past? Perhaps a different program might make it less of a bore.

Agree!  I had tried to do stronglifts a basic 5X5 program and it literally just bored me to tears.  I didn't enjoy it and after putting up with it for 2 months I went back to a NROL program.  I like the format of these kind of workouts cause they are always changing rep schemes, exercises and challenging. 

Finding a program that is fun is key

#16  
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All different stuff, i am just a cardio junkie!
Original Post by caseylou2:

All different stuff, i am just a cardio junkie!

This suggests to me that your prior weight training involved a bunch of random exercises thrown together with not rhyme or reason except that they looked easy.

Original Post by trh:As someone who does both free weights and yoga believe me when I say that not all the hard work is being done in the weight room.

You know, I love yoga for the flexibility benefits and just the ability to strengthen the mind-body connection, but there is a very limited potential for implementing the kind of progressive overload that you need to qualify as strength training.

 Every kind of training has one or more physical quality on my favorite chart where it will cross the Minimum Essential Strain to elicit a training effect. But it also somewhat depending on your current condition, a beginner will in fact cross the MES threshold for several qualities at once during the first 6-8 weeks almost no matter what you do because their initial starting point is so close to zero. However, once you're out of that "untrained beginner" zone where your MES threshold is 40-60% of your max in whatever dimension and into the "beginner" zone where your MES threshold has moved to 60-80% of your current max, your development will plateau in the fitness dimensions you're not specifically training. Not to mention what happens when you're a "novice" with a MES of 80-90% or you become an "intermediate" and your MES threshold is 90-95% of your current max.

 If you're only doing yoga, pilates and barre workouts, well, sure, you're still crossing your MES threshold for flexibility and strength endurance but unless you're implementing some sort of progression model you're not going to be crossing the MES values that will elicit a maximal strength response any more than you're going to be eliciting a VoMax response or increasing your sprint speed.

 Now, whether you care about that is a different story - it all depends on where on that chart your personal performance goal resides. Or if you've got body composition goals instead, though they tend to live in the same place as performance goals that matches the look - the easiest way to look like a cyclist is to become one.

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