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Cycling and Slim Legs


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Does cycling help with slimming and shaping legs? I started cycling at 10-12 mph for 30 minutes every day last week, burning around 300 cals, hoping that it would slim the sides of my legs and my thighs. If I continue doing that every day would that make my legs even bulkier and muscular or would it help slim them down? By the way, nearly all my excess weight is stored  in the upper portion of my legs, so it's mostly fat up there.

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You're about the same body type as me, and I'm a die-hard, all-the-time cyclist.  I've still got fat on my upper thighs- that's where it's most concentrated so that's where it's slowest to come off from. How you burn calories doesn't determine where fat will come off.

Still, cycling is good because you will tone the muscle you've got under your fat. This should show up on your calves before too long (if you're like me, there's not a lot of fat stored on the calf). And as you lose the fat on your thighs, you'll be able to see the toned, fantastic muscle that's waiting underneath.

And, of course, it's fun to do.

The stuff sticking out the sides is fat, not muscle.  Cycling will build up muscle in your calves and the front and back of the legs, not the sides. 

Exercise can not burn fat in any specific location.  Fat will come off where it wants to, not where you want it to. 

So, cut back on calories and do exercises you like.  Try to do both cardio and strength training for optimum results.

Original Post by devrim:

Does cycling help with slimming and shaping legs?

I certainly hope not! (for my sake) because I cycle and I already got slim legs, I don't need them any slimmer. But if you want great legs, I hear stair climbing is great for that because your weight is supported by your lower body creating more impact. Stairs are great for weight loss too. It has worked for me.

oh Clharr,

I just got my bike and starting to ride on it. I thought it will slim my legs. You are burning down my spirit of biking with this statement. "Fat will come off where it wants to, not where you want it to. " Sob sob.........should i pray to God then?

Pohpoh

 

Cycling WILL help,

but running/jogging will even more, in my opinion.

I usually row 4-5 days a week,

but on my days off i love alternating running and cycling (every other day),

i absolutly LOVE biking,

but i really get more of a workout from running/jogging.

Cycling (at least, hard cycling) will NOT slim legs. But, it definitly can help tone them, and lower body fat (which in some cases, will slim).

But, look at serious cyclers, do they have slim legs? No, they rather big powerhouses of muscle. But, that's okay: it's proof that they can maintain a 20+ MPH pace for long distances. 

Running, however, will slim legs. 

I don't know - these biking legs are pretty slim.

On the other hand, this runner's legs - I wouldn't say slim.

Original Post by amethystgirl:

I don't know - these biking legs are pretty slim.

On the other hand, this runner's legs - I wouldn't say slim.

Cycling clothes just look weird. lol

UD

Original Post by amethystgirl:

I don't know - these biking legs are pretty slim.

On the other hand, this runner's legs - I wouldn't say slim.

well i think it depends on everyone's body type & what sort of cross training they do. maybe that biker doesn't go near weights or maybe his legs were naturally so skinny before and that is actually biggest he could get them??? who knows.

i think you'll have to be specific with how you want to reshape your legs. like would you be happy if your legs were an inch or two smaller but didn't have the flab? slim & tone sounds like to me you want to decrease the fat & increase the muscle. whats the rest of your body fat like? usually the place we mostly complain about is the place where are bodies will pick last to lose fat. for me its my hips & inner thighs.

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