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Dangers of cross-fitting?


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http://www.murphyfitness.com/blog/crossfit-re view-strain-training

 

I'm not a fan of blogs as factual evidence of anything, but I definitely have to agree with the points made

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Original Post by armandounc:

Agreed. Same way I feel about nutritionists.

The term "nutritionist" is not protected or controlled in any way in the US. Anyone interested in nutrition can call themselves a nutritionist. So, some would be good, and some know nothing.

Do you feel that way about registered dietitians?

It surprises me you ask that, because I've made it clear before, as you just did, what the difference between a nutritionist and a dietician is. I am well aware. I have told people before that nutritionists could just as easily be very knowledgeable as they could know squat. Being a dietician is on a completely different level. I would (almost) never question anything a dietician says.

Crossfit - what actual athletes do when they retire to keep in some reasonable semblance of competitive shape, and what people do when they give up on becoming real athletes performing at a high level in any given sport.

 People with ambitions to perform at any level beyond decent high school level in any specific sport will stay the hell away from CrossFit where performance worse than a mid-level high school athlete is considered Elite.

 Armandounc could do Crossfit with good results if he's completely certain that he's never going to be competing ever again, but if he wants to compete for even something like lowly amateur club champion, he'll stick to following the training system he learned as a collegiate athlete and leave the CrossFit idiocy alone.

From what I've seen it's terribly overpriced, well at least in the UK.

You can join a boxing club and pay a fraction of what CF charge per session. 

 

I tried Cross fit too and I have to agree completely.  It's a breeding ground for injury.  The exercises should not be done in a group, they should be done one on one, they should be done slowly and some of them should not be done at all.

I agree with most, the form is more important than speed. That becomes even more true when you are old, like me. 

But, I kind of like the looks of this workout, and it seems pretty safe. Any comments on that?

The only potential problem I see is that people with poor shoulder mobility might have trouble moving the bar from in front of their shoulders to behind their shoulders.  

Original Post by oldguysrule:

I agree with most, the form is more important than speed. That becomes even more true when you are old, like me. 

But, I kind of like the looks of this workout, and it seems pretty safe. Any comments on that?

Its just a met-con.  Bodybuilders, powerlifters, gym rats et. al have been doing them long before Cross Fit TM was around.

If you are planning to do it - go lighter than you think you need to and be careful of the transition from the press to the back squat as there is some danger of shoulder impingements.

Original Post by oldguysrule:

I agree with most, the form is more important than speed. That becomes even more true when you are old, like me. 

But, I kind of like the looks of this workout, and it seems pretty safe. Any comments on that?

That was the first "CF" w/o I did when I started going to the class. It is tough on the shoulders going back and forth, for me anyway.

Original Post by oldguysrule:

I agree with most, the form is more important than speed. That becomes even more true when you are old, like me. 

But, I kind of like the looks of this workout, and it seems pretty safe. Any comments on that?

I love this complex, but I have only done it with a 40 lb barbell (wimpy me), as kind of a finisher.

Original Post by oldguysrule:

But, I kind of like the looks of this workout, and it seems pretty safe. Any comments on that?

Too much going on. Do burpees, push a sled, or learn how to do a good power clean and bang out 8 sets of 3 reps on 0:30-1:00.

 

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