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when to eat protein when trying to build muscle


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should i eat most of my protein in the day before i go to workout? or after or split it evenly? or does it not matter? i always feel more empowered when i work out late thus eating most of my protein earlier in the day? which is more effective? any help is much appreciated

 

17, 5'3", 125 

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#1  
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Throughout the day is preferable, but before and after your workout are most critical.
Every bodybuilder and fitness enthusiast knows that you must eat enough protein for muscle growth. Without the amino acids of protein, your muscles cannot grow no matter how hard and often you train your. Protein is the building block of muscles and there are no other nutrients to substitute protein for muscle growth.It is recommended that if you want to grow and build muscle mass, the rule is to eat one gram of protein per pound of your body weight per day. That is a lot of protein which many people cannot get in their normal dietary meals and protein supplementation is often necessary. Without eating enough protein, all your muscle building training in the gym will be futile. Such a waste isn't it?So when is the best time to eat protein to optimize muscle growth? How and which type of protein should you eat to get spectacular muscular growth?•Eat protein first thing in the morning – After a good night's sleep, your body is in a catabolic state. That means your body is burning your muscle for energy since your glycogen store is low. So eat quickly digestible protein such as whey protein the first thing in the morning even before you brush your teeth to prevent your muscle wasting away or catabolism.•Eat protein between your meals – To keep protein flowing in your bloodstream so as to feed your muscles continuously throughout the day, take casein protein in between your meals. Casein protein is slow to digest and as such will continuously release protein into your bloodstream to feed your muscles for many hours in between your meals. In this way, your muscles will be constantly receiving protein throughout the day.•Protein before/after gym workout – It is a known fact that eating fast to digest protein such as whey protein before your workout will promote muscle growth as your muscles are being fed as you training to build muscles. Then take whey protein again after your workout along with some carbohydrates to repair your muscle cells after you have damaged them during your workout.•Protein before bed – Since you will be going without food for many hours when you sleep and muscle building is at its optimum when you sleep, you must encourage your muscle to grow by eating casein protein before you sleep. As casein protein is slow to digest, it will continuously feed your muscles for as long as seven hours when you sleep and thus encouraging your muscles to build and grow.So now that you know when is the best time to eat protein and to encourage building muscles, follow these tips and see your muscles growing like you have never seen before.About The Author
Chris Chew is a fitness trainer of fashion models, actors and male pageant competitors. He is also the creator and author of Burn Fat Build Muscles Fast System. See his websites http://www.sgfitness.com and http://www.sgfitnessonline.com.
Isn't it 1 gram per lean pound of bodyweight? At least that's what I read. Otherwise a 300lb person would be eating a heck of a lot of protein.
Original Post by vicereine:

Isn't it 1 gram per lean pound of bodyweight? At least that's what I read. Otherwise a 300lb person would be eating a heck of a lot of protein.

no,its for every kg of weight.

i need 67 g  for example

since starting an intense strength training regimen, i have found b_leversedge's advice to be spot on.  i surround my workout w/whey protein (i have 1/2 scoop preworkout and 1 scoop postworkout.  sometimes i have another scoop a couple hours postworkout).  i try to eat some "normal" protein during the day (chicken/lentils/greek yogurt/peanut butter).  before bed i eat some form of casein protein (cottage cheese or sliced provologne). 

i've put on a lot of muscle and gotten much strong since i started a few months ago.  good luck!

 The RDA figure of 0.8g/kg is only valid for sedentary individuals. People who work in offices, drive everywhere and veg out in front of the TV all day.

 For active individuals, the figure is higher, up to 1.6-1.8 grams of protein per kilo of bodyweight according to the latest research in  Journal of American College of Nutrition. The RDA is only valid for you if your only exercise is walking to the car, and the heaviest weight you lift is a box of Krispy Kreme donuts.

 So if you're hanging out here it's not valid for you. 1g/lbs is a bit overkill but as a rule of thumb it's at least in the right ballpark.

This is a particular problem for women working out - most women severely undereat protein for their activity level.

 'Course, most men overeat protein - but getting a bit more than you need is nowhere near as harmful as starving your body of building material.

Oh, yes - it's also a good idea to try to fit your food into the WHO recommendations for a healthy diet -the ratios that the WHO recommends (pdf - page 56):
  • Total fat - 15 to 30%
    • Saturated fatty acids - <10%
    • Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) - 6 to 10%
      • Omega-6 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) - 5 to 8%
      • Omega-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) - 1 to 2%
    • Trans fatty acids - <1%
    • Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) - By difference
  • Total carbohydrate - 55 to 75%
    • Free sugars - <10%
  • Protein - 10 to 15%
  • Cholesterol - <300 mg per day
  • Sodium chloride (sodium) - <5 g per day
  • Fruits and vegetables - 5400 g per day
  • Total dietary fibre - From foods
  • Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) - From foods
(Thanks, MikeLane for that one!)

 The right way to do a diet is to figure out your protein needs at maintenance and then cut dietary fat and carbs to create your caloric deficit, and do resistance training. That way you'll preserve lean mass while dieting and won't just wind up as a smaller version of yourself at the same body fat percentage.

 Note that animal protein is not neccesary. It's completely possible to do this on a strict vegan diet, it just requires more awareness of your needs and work towards fulfilling them.

 But knock it off with the undereating protein - you're scaring your poor body by starving it of building material :)
<---- was inspired by this thread to immediately go drink a protein shake.
Original Post by melkor:

 The RDA figure of 0.8g/kg is only valid for sedentary individuals. People who work in offices, drive everywhere and veg out in front of the TV all day. 

 
I am sedentary due to disability and there is no way I am eating 200 grams of protein.  There has to be a cut off point.
#9  
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To add to melkor's post:

As I understand it, the recommendation .8g/kg or 1.6-1.8g/kg of protein should be calculated based on ideal weight, at least for people carrying excess fat, as it is relative to amount of lean mass. So if you're active and trying to lose fat, calculate 1.6-1.8g of protein per kg of what your goal weight is.

(If your "excess" weight is in the form of lean mass... don't do that :) )
#10  
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I go with 1-1.5g of protein/lb. Depending on how many calories you eat every day, this can be a lot easier than it seems. 
#11  
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Just a note that there are adverse effects to eating too much protein. Overloads your kidneys, for one. Probably not something you'd feel short-term, I'm guessing more of a long-term effect... so I wouldn't overdo it either.

Just my $.02.
#12  
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Original Post by flowerbud:

Just a note that there are adverse effects to eating too much protein. Overloads your kidneys, for one. Probably not something you'd feel short-term, I'm guessing more of a long-term effect... so I wouldn't overdo it either.

Just my $.02.

 It would take a lot of protein, assuming there was no pre-existing kidney problem...In excess of like 500g a day before that could become an issue. 

#13  
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Well, you could find sources that'll back up either argument.

Many sources say that the acids produced in protein metabolism are neutralized using calcium, and so excess protein consumption leeches calcium from bones and contributes to a higher risk of bone fractures. But I've also seen a source say that more protein in the diet increases bone density and may help prevent osteoporosis.

So, who knows. I'd stick with the most prevalent recommendation I've seen, which is .6-.8g/kg/day for inactive, 1.4-1.6g/kg/day for cardio-ers, and 1.6-1.8g/kg/day for weight lifters... which I think roughly translates to 15-30% of calories coming from protein.

And I guess in a couple of decades we'll see what worked best :-P
For me, 1.5g/kg is 183g/day! I am lucky to get 100 most days. But I am 271 lbs and do an hour of cardio at 75-85% maximum HR 5 days a week. Am I reading this right? Yikes. Since most of that weight is fat, is it possible I don't really need this much?
#15  
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No, the 1.5g/kg figure is on lean body mass- what you want to weigh, not what you actually weigh.
Whew! I am doing okay with the 100g, then. Thanks!

i weigh 65kg, am 183cm tall and eat about 400G protein a day. thats about 6g per KG. Guess that might be why i am so thin!! hahahah

Also, annoyingly, excess meat consumption, in susceptible individuals, can lead to gout

Keep it simple. It doesn't matter for 99% of the population.  If your hitting your daily calorie goal and consuming protein approx 1g/lb/lbm you'll do fine.

Zombie thread - but since its back I aim for 1 grm protein for each pound I weigh, but I am trying to maintain muscle mass while losing fat.  I lift weights I lift heavy weights and protein keeps me fuller longer than overloading on carbs.

The excess protein killing kidneys is dependent on your risk for kidney disease.  If you are a healthy individual without a family history or personal history of kidney problems you can eat protein with no issues.

 

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