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Does an elliptical mile = a regular mile?


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Do you think the elliptical is accurate with distance? If you ran 5 miles each day on the elliptical, would it be accurate to say that that person runs 35 miles a week, or is it not as difficult?

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 Well, given that people with shin splint issues train for entire marathons using the elliptical, I'd think that the distance measurements can't be that far off.

Personally I can run 10 miles on an elliptical but I struggle to run 2 miles on land. I think it depends on the person.

Your question is actually two:
1) Is the elliptical mile the same as a regular mile in terms of distance?
2) Is the elliptical mile the same as a regular mile in terms of difficulty?

The answer to your first question is:
1) Which weighs more, a ton of feathers or a ton of bricks?
Answer: They both weigh a ton: A mile is a mile is a mile.

2) It depends what your standard of comparison is, what causes you 'difficulty' (running uphill? running on a treadmill? power-walking?) and how hard you're pushing yourself on the elliptical.

The difference between running a mile on the elliptical, on the treadmill, powerwalking it or biking it is measured both in terms of difficulty (physical exertion) and the time it takes you to complete it.

The biggest difference between running and the ellpitcal for me is impact. I notice I only get the "lag" about 45 mins into the elliptical on a level 15... and then once I've passed the hour mark I can keep going. Notice how your legs are never really beat up the next day?? Well with running I notice... I can only run for about 2-3 miles on the treadmill (drenched in sweat and totally fatigued, mind you), but then today I ran from Northern Burlingame to my bf's house in Foster City and back nooooo problems... I mean I am walking weird bc my legs are stiffer than bricks but that's gotta be a 10 mile+ run altogether... and I also run those 10-20 miles trails no probs either..

All in all I'd say the less impact the easier it is to have endurance.

Original Post by littlemalynda:

The biggest difference between running and the ellpitcal for me is impact. I notice I only get the "lag" about 45 mins into the elliptical on a level 15... and then once I've passed the hour mark I can keep going. Notice how your legs are never really beat up the next day?? Well with running I notice... I can only run for about 2-3 miles on the treadmill (drenched in sweat and totally fatigued, mind you), but then today I ran from Northern Burlingame to my bf's house in Foster City and back nooooo problems... I mean I am walking weird bc my legs are stiffer than bricks but that's gotta be a 10 mile+ run altogether... and I also run those 10-20 miles trails no probs either..

All in all I'd say the less impact the easier it is to have endurance.

Keep in mind that running outside will almost always be less sweaty than running inside, because outside the wind going past your face evaporates the sweat and helps keep you cool, but inside you don't get that, unless you have a fan on your face.

I agree that lower impact exercises make it easier to keep going, however.

#6  
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I think the elliptical machine measures the distance that the wheel turns.  If you ran on a treadmill or the street, part of the time you are literally flying through the air, gaining distance.  On the elliptical you are never flying so you don't get that extra distance with each step, you only get one revolution worth 1 yard each or whatever.  I spend 30 minutes on my machine at a moderate jogging pace and only cover 1 mile.  That's only 2 miles an hour.  I know if I were on the street at that pace I could easily cover more than twice that distance. The average person jogs about 6 miles per hour.

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