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Exercising twice a day


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Hi guys, just wanted to find out your experience in exercising twice a day, never really thought about it much, done some research and I'm going to make sure that they're different, i.e. cardio in the morning, resistance in the evening, eat more for obvious reasons and make sure I get enough rest. I'm going to give it a go, see how I feel, listen to my body and see what happens. Also, I have a very sedentary desk job, so I'll get a lot of rest inbetween.

 

Just wanted to find out if anybody does this or has any experiences to share and I'll add my experiences into this, maybe somebody will come across this and this could help them.

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I run twice a day during the week, so not quite the same that you will be doing. For me, the key is in keeping one workout hard and/or long and the other one short. I will typically run 6-8 miles in the morning (sometimes fast, sometimes not) and 3-4 in the afternoons. The afternoon workout is more a chance to get in some extra mileage and shake out my legs without doing a hard workout. It is also really important to listen to your body. Sometimes your body doesn't want to exercise because it is hot, you are tired, etc. and you need to ignore the lazy signals from your body and go workout. Other times, though, your body is telling you that it needs to rest, and that is OK too. I enjoy running twice a day, but not everyone can exercise twice a day without getting bored. It should never feel like exercise is taking over your life--you should be doing it because you enjoy it and want to exercise, not because you "ought" to.

I try to run five/six days a week, and strength train 3, so I end up doing two workouts some days.

On the running, I have hard days, and easy days. I avoid hard running on the same day as strength training, as they interfere even if done in separate workouts. When I do easy runs on the same day as a strength training day, I do them as separate workouts if I have the time, but can't always do that. Cardio in the evening disrupts my sleep, so my ideal combination is a trail run in the morning, and weights in the evening. I do all sorts of combinations and substitutions to make things work out though.

I run 5 days a week and do some type of cross trainng 2-3 times a week. I also like to bicycle, so I frequently find myself working out twice a day. I think the most important thing is to take one day a week off to let your body rest. I definitely feel better after a rest day and my workouts are more productive.

w/running sometimes i only have time for like 60-90 mins in the morning so sometimes i add 1-3 miles in the evening but not this week this week i feel like pooper

I sometimes exercise twice a day and I also spend most of my work day at my desk, but I usually keep one session lighter than the other. For example, I might swim in the morning before work and then do a harder cardio or strength session in the evening. If I do a harder session in the morning I will do a lighter session in the evening, such as a short jog or pilates or something. I think the key is to keep it balanced so as not to burn your body out, also ensuring you do give your body rest days! I aim for 2 rest days per week. Good luck! :)

@emmarock: I will try to do this, I am thinking of planning days for example if I was to swim in the morning I would pair that with X as opposed to if I was to cycle in the morning I would pair that with Y. I've always found it hard to tell the difference between me being lazy and the signs, only way to learn is through experience, I guess. I do have a natural enthusiasm for exercise and sports, the thought of this genuinely excites me! Thanks for your input.

@oldguysrule: Avoiding hard running and strength training seems a very good idea, I think I will experiment, like I said above, with workouts, see what I like and what I don't agree with. Thanks

@johnpetersmith: As it is I try to do nothing on Sunday and I will maintain that, my plan is to workout early morning on weekdays and in the evenings on weekdays, and on Saturday's just one session (I usually play football so it will be that but until then just cardio) and Sunday complete rest. Thanks

@5k_10k_15k: I'm going to be cross training, maybe you could try the same? Thanks

@magor: Thank you, initially I was going to swim every morning but I think that I'm going to mix it up, see what the weathers like and have that variety available so it doesn't become a chore and I can do what I feel like. Thanks

 

Thank you everybody for your input, I'm making a list of activities, are there any you can add, I've got a maximum of an hour?

Variable activities:

Swimming

Long distance running

Interval running

Cycling

Upper body resistance training

Lower body resistance training

Set activities:

Circuit training

Football training

Football game

I'm going to attempt to put together a schedule and see how it goes, make changes etc.

I like to do two-a-days sometimes. For example, I may do a full body lifting session in the early afternoon and then my conditioning later on that night.

It all depends on how much rest I give myself between sets when I am lifting. To save time, I like to work opposing muscle groups during rest periods. For example, I will do a set of squats, rest a minute, do a set of bench press, rest a minute, do a set of rows, rest a minute,etc.. By the end of the end of the lifting I am worn out and have no energy left. However, if I lift more traditionally by taking three minutes rest between sets and completing all the sets for one exercise before moving onto the next, then I have more energy for conditioning afterward. My last workout I did a slower, more traditional workout, and was able to do hill sprints after. The workout before, I lifted using the opposing muscle group strategy and had to wait until that night to run sprints.

Original Post by vyperman7:

I like to do two-a-days sometimes. For example, I may do a full body lifting session in the early afternoon and then my conditioning later on that night. I find that by splitting my weight training and conditioning apart at times, it allows me to have more energy for running sprints, pushing the Prowler, etc.. The one thing I like about doing it all in one workout is that it helps to improve work capacity. Still though, sometimes I just don't have the energy needed to do conditioning after lifting.

That sounds fair enough, do you have an active job do you mind me asking? The main reason I want to try this is because of my sedentary job (I've walked about 50 feet in the last three hours) so hopefully, I can use the 9+ hours inbetween as recovery and then start again. I think athletes do something similar, workout at a certain time and because they're full time athletes they have so much time to rest and can workout again, maybe that's a myth but it does make sense.

Original Post by legenary1:

Original Post by vyperman7:

I like to do two-a-days sometimes. For example, I may do a full body lifting session in the early afternoon and then my conditioning later on that night. I find that by splitting my weight training and conditioning apart at times, it allows me to have more energy for running sprints, pushing the Prowler, etc.. The one thing I like about doing it all in one workout is that it helps to improve work capacity. Still though, sometimes I just don't have the energy needed to do conditioning after lifting.

That sounds fair enough, do you have an active job do you mind me asking? The main reason I want to try this is because of my sedentary job (I've walked about 50 feet in the last three hours) so hopefully, I can use the 9+ hours inbetween as recovery and then start again. I think athletes do something similar, workout at a certain time and because they're full time athletes they have so much time to rest and can workout again, maybe that's a myth but it does make sense.

Sitting isn't very good for leg circulation or for a stiff back (if you get that), so try to get up as often as you can. Maybe sit on a fit ball, or put one of those stability disks in your office chair to keep you from stiffening up.

During training for long triathlons, 2-a-days is almost a requirement.

Almost everyday is a morning workout and an afternoon workout.  Then weekends are sometimes bricks (bike X miles then get off bike and immediately run X miles) or sometimes just long rides/runs.

Its not uncommon to have 14-20 hours of exercise during a week.

I used to walk 2 times a day as soon as I got up and again after work before I came home.  Then I did elliptical in the am's and weight lifting in the evening after work. 

I don't know if it helped or hindered my progress.  At the time I was just walking I did lose a lot of weight, but I also was eating very low calorie - when I was doing the weight lifting and ellitpical I was in good shape not really losing weight, but I wasn't eating at a deficit

 

@oldguysrule: I realise this, I used to have problems with my lower back but I have made adaptions to the screen and also make a conscious effort to maintain good posture in everything I do, even if I walk to the shops, just constantly making sure. I do get up and about, I was tempted to get a fit ball but I was wondering if it'd be too much? Say I spend 5 or 6 hours sitting on it, my core is going to be constantly engaged isn't it? Seems like it's going to have no rest?

@anthony_christianson: That's good to hear, I can't wait to get into training, I've got to wait until the 11th to start training twice a day but at the moment I'm just buzzing to start it, that sort of regime sounds good to me, mate.

@dbackerfan: How did you manage that? Seems like a lot to me, was you happy doing that?

Original Post by legenary1:


@dbackerfan: How did you manage that? Seems like a lot to me, was you happy doing that?

I wasn't walking and doing elliptical each morning I did one for about a year then switched to elliptical when my shin splints and plantar fascitits got so bad it hurt to walk.

I suffered from insomnia so always woke up about 5 am and would exercise for an hour either walking or elliptical each morning and then after I left work would go straight to the gym to lift weights or to the track at the school to walk - so it wasn't an issue.  I enjoyed this exercise "me" time a lot and since it was fun for me and improved me I have kept at it.  Now I just don't work out in the mornings.  Just before I go home after work I'll hit the gym for some weight lifting or a class.  Now its just a habit and I don't even think twice about it

Original Post by dbackerfan:

Original Post by legenary1:


@dbackerfan: How did you manage that? Seems like a lot to me, was you happy doing that?

I wasn't walking and doing elliptical each morning I did one for about a year then switched to elliptical when my shin splints and plantar fascitits got so bad it hurt to walk.

I suffered from insomnia so always woke up about 5 am and would exercise for an hour either walking or elliptical each morning and then after I left work would go straight to the gym to lift weights or to the track at the school to walk - so it wasn't an issue.  I enjoyed this exercise "me" time a lot and since it was fun for me and improved me I have kept at it.  Now I just don't work out in the mornings.  Just before I go home after work I'll hit the gym for some weight lifting or a class.  Now its just a habit and I don't even think twice about it

Oh ok, that makes sense now.

I'm the same when it comes to the "me" time, quite enjoy the peace of the gym or exercising on my own just so I can chill out and gather my thoughts. I've also got used to just going to the gym or exercising after work, for me it's a shock if I don't.

Bring on 11th July!

Original Post by legenary1:

@oldguysrule: I realise this, I used to have problems with my lower back but I have made adaptions to the screen and also make a conscious effort to maintain good posture in everything I do, even if I walk to the shops, just constantly making sure. I do get up and about, I was tempted to get a fit ball but I was wondering if it'd be too much? Say I spend 5 or 6 hours sitting on it, my core is going to be constantly engaged isn't it? Seems like it's going to have no rest?

.

Yes, you could fatigue your core, which could affect your evening workout. It might even lead to back injury if you lifted weights in the evening. I was thinking along the lines of sitting surfaces that might allow better circulation, and more movement throughout the day to speed recovery. Those "knee" chairs allow great blood flow to the legs, but they kind of "lock you in" to one position. Tipping the front edge of your office chair down might help blood flow too (assuming you have a chair with that feature).

You are kind of in a catch-22. You have had back problems, and it would be good to build coordination and strength in your core muscles, but you don't want to be overly fatigued for your evening workout.

The "disk" in your chair causes less fatigue in the deep stability muscles than the big balls do (because there is little balancing involved), so that might be safer.

The balls and disks need to be incorporated gradually, because they use some muscles that may be extremely weak/inactive after years of sitting. They also hurt your rear end after a while, especially if blown up tight.

My experience is that exercising in the morning and again after work is a GREAT way to get your metabolism bumpin'!

Also, sneaking in some extra walking, or deskercises, while at work helps, too. Wink

Do you have a dog? My dog is my exercise buddy, because I have to take her for at least 4 walks every day (I don't have a fence around my yard). They're short walks - 5 to 10 mins each, but it's something!

I also like to do a short run in the morning (20 to 30 mins) and then do some more working out in the evening. The morning run just makes me feel good and that way I know I've gotten in my exercise for the day no matter what.

I'd bring the dog for the morning runs, but she finds the pace too fast for how much sniffing she needs to do.

Good luck with your goals and I hope this helps!

-Maddy

@oldguysrule: I think I'm going to have to experiment, see what happens, maybe I try mixing it around say 15 minutes sitting on the ball then 45 minutes in the chair, some kinda ratio like that, see how I go. Thank you.

@themcmaster: That's good to hear, how long have you been doing that for? I used to go running at 6.30am, starting at a few miles then increasing it up to about 7, unfortunately I kinda burned out (not majorly) because of working 9-5 then on my weekend driving 55 miles each way to learn to become a PT. The monday morning I had nothing in me, I realised that I was doing too much and hit it on the head. Also, I was struggling to get a good amount of sleep so my new plan is change my hours to 10-6 so I can wake up the 7.30 (usually up at 7) and get an hour of exercise in before work, rev my metabolism up, I used to feel great in the mornings after running but it did catch up with me eventually! Thanks for replying and, yes I do have a dog but I resist the urge to walk them due to it being my dad's only form of exercise (completely different story, one day he'll thank me for nagging him!)

I finished my first Ironman last year, and training absolutely required two-a-days. The biggest challenge I faced was logistical: between work, family, house, and training, I had very little time to spare. So here's what I did to streamline everything:

  • I tried to plan a week at a time. I could fit most of the workouts around my other obligations, but there were some two-a-days that I just couldn't do without juggling other stuff, and the long sessions really impacted our weekend plans. So I'd sit down with my wife and negotiate when exactly it would be optimal for me to go out for a five hour ride followed by an hour run. I also took some personal days, which really eased things a lot.
  • I started keeping a bunch of food to work so I didn't have to pack lunch every day. I kept a fruit basket on my desk, dry goods in a drawer (cereal, whey, peanut butter, dried fruit), eggs & yogurt in the fridge, and lunches in the freezer. Then every Monday, I bring in a few bags of groceries. (This makes one less thing to grab in the morning.)
  • Speaking of one less thing to forget, I started keeping common gear in my trunk (clothing, backup run shoes, bike shoes, floor pump, tubes, helmet, extra towels).
  • I write things down as I need them and check the list when I get home. Then I empty my bag, clean any gear that needs it, then repack my bag for the next day.
  • And a bunch of little things: set reminders in Outlook to eat, stretch, get up to go work out; develop a routine for getting changed to maximize time at lunch; rig a standing desk setup so I wouldn't be sitting on my arse all day; etc.
Original Post by cnichols2000:

I finished my first Ironman last year, and training absolutely required two-a-days. The biggest challenge I faced was logistical: between work, family, house, and training, I had very little time to spare. So here's what I did to streamline everything:

  • I tried to plan a week at a time. I could fit most of the workouts around my other obligations, but there were some two-a-days that I just couldn't do without juggling other stuff, and the long sessions really impacted our weekend plans. So I'd sit down with my wife and negotiate when exactly it would be optimal for me to go out for a five hour ride followed by an hour run. I also took some personal days, which really eased things a lot.
  • I started keeping a bunch of food to work so I didn't have to pack lunch every day. I kept a fruit basket on my desk, dry goods in a drawer (cereal, whey, peanut butter, dried fruit), eggs & yogurt in the fridge, and lunches in the freezer. Then every Monday, I bring in a few bags of groceries. (This makes one less thing to grab in the morning.)
  • Speaking of one less thing to forget, I started keeping common gear in my trunk (clothing, backup run shoes, bike shoes, floor pump, tubes, helmet, extra towels).
  • I write things down as I need them and check the list when I get home. Then I empty my bag, clean any gear that needs it, then repack my bag for the next day.
  • And a bunch of little things: set reminders in Outlook to eat, stretch, get up to go work out; develop a routine for getting changed to maximize time at lunch; rig a standing desk setup so I wouldn't be sitting on my arse all day; etc.

With my current job hours changing, I'll have about an hour in the morning to train and more than an hour in the evenings, I just need to sort out a training programme and I'll be sorted, I've noticed you can get 24 week training programmes on the Internet from people that know what they're talking about (I think/hope), so that's my backup plan, I've got 13 months until the event I want to compete in (Bolton Ironman 2012) and if I'm not comfortable with my training my Christmas, I'll have ~28 weeks left, enough time to use one of those plans.

Thanks for that advice, I'll try and do what you did, does seems a very good idea. I've got a couple of problems, as it is: 1, I can't swim front crawl (breaststroke only, taught myself) but hopefully a friend of mine will teach me/I'll pick it up and she can assess my technique (she's a swimming instructor) and 2, I don't have a racing bike and can't afford one! Hopefully, things will change and I'll be able to get a loan for one, if not I'll have to go on a mountain bike, which I can imagine triathletes would cry at the thought!

What was your time, if you don't mind me asking? I'm completely torn, last years Bolton Ironman, two people in my age category qualified for Hawaii and the times were approx 10:50 & 11:20. I think I could do each leg seperately in 10 hours, it's just the lack of rest, which will obviously make the time higher and the fact I've no experience whatsoever. The reason I'm torn is half of me is thinking just finish it in under 17, there's always next time to aim for a time like that, don't overdo it, go at your pace, don't race it, just complete it and the competitive side of me is like, you've got 13 months to get in the best shape of your life, your not in bed shape as it is, that time is realistic. It sounds stupid but I absolutely love challenges. If someone said to me I bet you a penny you can't do 1,000 pushups in an hour, I'd do it and, even if I failed, give it 100% effort to make sure that I did everything I could, I guess it's just the way I am, stupid really!

Thanks for the advice, no doubt this will be of great help!

My finishing time was 16:39:54. My best time for each event separately is 1:15 for swim, 6:30 bike, and 4:00 run. Add 45 minutes for transitions, special needs, pee breaks, what have you, that's 12:30. I had hoped to finish around 14:00, but had major cramping on the run and couldn't run more than five minutes at a stretch, so I wound up walking about half the time.

What's your longest to date? What's your current fitness level?

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