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Exercising up to 4 hours a day?


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OK so i know all pros train for like 4 hours a day and wanted to give it a try!  any tips to prevent injuries and not get burned out while doing 2-4 hours of exercise a day?

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What are you training for?

Unless your training for a sport like body building, Running etc.  You probably don't need to workout for even 2 hours.  However,  repeat what AG said what are you trying to accomplish

Well its hockey season at the moment and i really need to improve my fitness, i also want to build up to doing some triathalons and i need to improve my endurance for cricket season when we are playing like 5 hour matches.

I dont know how experienced you are but try the couch to 25k program found here:  http://www.c25k.com/.   Swimming would probably be a better way to increase your endurance in 4 hours in the gym.  If you look around the fitness programs there is plenty of workouts around.

Athletes don't start out working out that much. They work up to it. In my opinion, four hours per day is overkill. However, if you do want to workout that much, start with doing an hour 3-5x per week because you say that you need to improve your fitness. Then once your conditioning and overall fitness begins to improve, you can increase the workload. However, trying to do much too fast, will either lead to injury or at the very least lead to over training. Neither of which you want to go through.

 

well i already do an hour-2 hours of exercise most days so should i just build on that?

I exercise/train for 2 - 2.5 hours a day and the way I keep up my strength, make sure I don't get hurt, etc is by eating a lot of omega-3 fats, high quality protein foods and lots of antioxidant rich veggies (as well as take LOTS of vitamins, minerals, etc). I truly feel as though diet plays an intricate role in how you will perform in the gym, so please be sure to really focus on what you're eating and make sure it's helping and not hurting you!

In 1997 I lost 80 lbs, part almost starving myself, taking diet pills, and working out every night doing all kinds of free-style moving , work out, and dancing every night for 2 hours easily.

And you see, here I am back again with 80 pounds to lose. It was a jumble of bad diet choices, I got results....but not for long. And I do not work out anymore. I am just begining to lose again and add some working out.

The moral is , pick a diet plan you can live with, supports good health, AND working out that fits into your life and that you can use to enrich your diet and workout, and continue with the rest of your life with if you want. If you are not an athlete , or training for a marathon, there is no reason to work out 2-4 hours every day. If you are, then you are the expert. Perhaps you might want to seek advice from a marathon trainer, either on line, or talk to other athletes who have competed, and can give you first hand experience on how they trained and worked up to 2-4 hours.  

Original Post by stephannalee:

well i already do an hour-2 hours of exercise most days so should i just build on that?

What kinds of things are you doing in your workouts presently?

Original Post by stephannalee:

Well its hockey season at the moment and i really need to improve my fitness, i also want to build up to doing some triathalons and i need to improve my endurance for cricket season when we are playing like 5 hour matches.

 Even when I trained for an Ironman triathlon I didn't often train for 4 hours a day.  Right towards the peak I might do a 2 hour swim in the morning and a 2 hour run after work, or a 5 hour bike ride on the weekend, but even at that level it was by no means the norm.

To train 'smart' is more important than just to train mindlessly long!

Original Post by vyperman7:

Athletes don't start out working out that much. They work up to it. In my opinion, four hours per day is overkill.

 Absolutely!!

Other than athletes who are training for something really "big" like a boxing title fight, marathon, or similar event, I doubt that doing 4 hours of intense exercise daily is recommended.

Several CC posters on the Fitness site have pointed out that quality is more important than quantity when it comes to exercising.  I completely agree.

I do, myself, "exercise" 3-5 hours most days.  However, my exercising is quantity and not quality.  I often walk to and from grocery stores, convenient stores, etc. and also take other walks in and outside of town.  So I might spend 2 hours a day walking on some days.  I also will plug in my headphones to my TV and spin for an hour to 90 minutes, sometimes twice a day.  So on a few days a week, at least, I might get in 4 hours or so of exercise. 

I only spin at 15-16 mph on my Airdyne and only walk around 3.2 to 3.8 mph on most of my walks.  I have been doing this for well over a year.  My body feels good (for being the body of an older, if not old, man).  But there is nothing intense about my 4 hours of exercise.

Training for marathons, I only ran about 10 hours a week.

For 50 and 100 milers, it was about 20 hours a week.

For multi-day adventure races (run, mountain bike, and paddle) it was 25-30 hours a week. To get that much actual training in, on various sports, consumed about 40 hours a week due to all the driving, bike and boat maintenance, multiple showers a day, and "naps." I'd have to quit my job for the few months before each race (I raced once a year).

For hockey, I'd say one hour of intense training plus some extra time for flexibility, agility, and sport specific skills would be plenty.

To last through 5 hours of cricket (lots of standing still, but with sprints)? I'd just get an outdoor job that was vigorous and that would keep you up and moving all day. An example would be to join a landscaping crew as an unskilled laborer, mowing, pruning trees, digging, moving rocks all day. Cricket will seem like "resting up."

Original Post by backinthenines:

Original Post by vyperman7:

Athletes don't start out working out that much. They work up to it. In my opinion, four hours per day is overkill.

 Absolutely!!

+1, train smarter, not harder.

I don't know where you got the idea that "all pros train for like 4 hours a day".  They don't and you don't need to either. 

uh... if you are eating enough then you're fine, if you arent.. then dont be surprised if you start feeling like crap, start losing performance, start dreading your workouts, etc....

In the spring before racing season, me and my club (I'm a sprint kayaker) travel somewhere warm and train about 4 hours a day in preparation. But we space it out so much that there is really not much time for anything else in the day, and I had to quit school for the 4 week camp. In the morning we would go for a 30 minute run @7am, go make and eat breakfast, do a 1 hour paddling workout @9am followed by a 1 hour weight session or run, make and eat lunch, go for another paddling workout @4pm, and finish with yoga/pilates/stretching for 30mins after the paddle, then make and eat supper. It was exhausting even without a job or school, and I can't see anyone being able to maintain that while living a normal life. But if you are willing to put everything else on hold for a while, it's definitely an experience. Just make sure the meals you are eating are enough to sustain and nourish your body to build the muscle and endurance you will need for this. Good luck, train smart, and listen to your body!!!

What i have learned just from my experience from overtraining. It does feel good to workout excessively (such as 4 hours per day, assuming a hard workout) however, it will only last for a few months. Just recently i burned out and right now it was probably the worst feeling i've had in my life, just make sure every week or two you get 1-2 rest days or else eventually (no matter who you are) you will get burned up and feel tired constantly. Hard work pays off, i started around 260 very overweight, trained the hardest i will ever train and i'm at 180 fairly lean right now.. Just remember that you have to have time for other stuff in you life or else it will not seem worth it after awhile. keep working hard you have my support

Even when I was a competitive marathon runner- I trained no more 20 hours a week. Pros do train for 4 hrs or more during certain times of the year but remember-- some if that is skill practice- mobility work etc. it is broken up..Increasing endurance does not necessarily mean long bouts of working out. On the contrary..excessive or constant long workouts lead to injury and burn out.

I am a marathoner and am training with a friend for his upcoming Ironman.  We train a lot.  Even then, I only train that long once a week, when I do a Century Ride  ...  and that is 5 or 6 hours.  But that is not that taxing on the body.  My weekly long run of 20 miles takes about 3 1/2 hours.  Otherwise, most of my daily training is an hour or two. 

I train to the verge of overtraining.  Yet I don't train near 4 hours a day.

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