Fitness
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is going to the gym 7 days a week bad or okay.  As in doing cardio everyday and then weights every other day.  Or is a day completely off required?
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I work out 7 days a week on average.  Cardio each day and weights every other day.  If you work up to it I don't see any problem.  I did start out just walking 7 days a week.  
#2  
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If you're eating enough then it's fine.

You do need to give your body some rest time but how long depends on how intense you work out.

I alternate weights/cardio. I don't think I could do my current weight routing every day but I could do a lighter routine.
you should never work out every day of the week.  at least take off one day. your muscles do need rest and you are setting yourself up for increased risk of injury.  if you fail to let your muscles rest you can lead to overtraining which will actually decrease your performance.

http://www.ediets.com/news/article.cfm/cmi_21 78857/code_30171

additionally, people who feel a need to exercise ALL the time can be showing signs of something more serious such as a type of eating disorder called exercise bulimia where people exercise rather then purge.  Its merely a substitue complusive behavior

http://www.webmd.com/content/article/14/1676_ 51907

if you  cut back by one day you will likely improve your fitness

htide
#4  
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every time I go to the doctor,  I am advised to get 20 minutes of cardio everyday.  I would agree with the others about resting for lifting.  
I personally consider it to be safe to do cardio 7 days a week, but ideally you want to mix it up so your body isn't constantly using the same muscles/tendons/ligaments. 

For example, if your primary activity is the elliptical, then two or three days a week try a spinning or aerobics class, or swimming, tennis, a brisk walk or run, etc.  That way your heart is getting it's cardio benefits, but your body isn't being dragged into a repetitive rut or risking overuse injuries. 

Also change up the intensity and duration.  I may run 5 times a week, but one or two will likely be shorter, faster runs, two or three will be middle distance, regular pace runs, and one will be a long slow run.  Same goes for the elliptical - you can have high resistance one day, then no resistance and speed it up the next.

Do always give your muscles 48 hours of rest in between strength training.  And do always mix up your routines to get the most benefit and the least stress.
p001
Jan 15 2007 18:19
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#6  
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Normally I work on Cardio 7 days a week and weight training on alternative days(once in 3 days if I feel little tired).
I usually work out in some respect 6 or 7 days a week, and have gone 7 days/week for the last 3 weeks.  I've been exercising for a few years now, and have been increasing gradually.  I tend to mix up what I'm doing (running, weights, step class, yoga, jujitsu, etc.) so I'm not putting my body through the same stress each day, and also so I don't claw out my eyeballs in boredom.     If you keep on doing the same thing over and over again, your body isn't going to respond like you want it to, and you'll be setting yourself up for injury.  And I agree with pandajenn19 that you need to make sure that you vary the intensity through the week. (Also, every four or five weeks give yourself a recovery week when you don't push yourself very hard, and maybe even miss a day or two.  Your body will thank you for the rest, and you'll find that you'll perform better afterwards.) 
The AMA advises 30 minutes a day of "moderate" exercise.  This can be 3 10 minutes seg 2 15 min segments or one 30 min.  
No problem working out 7 days a week, but you can vary your routine. I take two body conditioning classes on Monday, Yoga and a toning class on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are free weights and a swim or session on the elliptical, Friday is Pilates and free weights, and Sat. and Sunday are usually elliptical days. Just rotate activities to avoid wearing down the same area of the body with overwork. Of course, there is the occasional day where you do nothing!
Absolutely work out cardio every day! My former routine consisted of cardio for 90 minutes every day and then 60 minutes of strength training 6 days a week (upper body one day, lower body the next, core-abs and back-every day).

Now I go for an hour of cardio 5-7 days a week and strength training 2 times a week (for maintenance, but no more build up).

Your muscles can be damaged if they are used every day (each muscle group needs a day of rest), but it is very good for weight loss and cardiovascular (and overall) health to get 30-60 minutes of cardio exercise daily.

Just make sure to include the time for a good strentching routine before and after any exercise. Not only does this help to warm up the muscles and loosen them (lessening chances of injury) but it releases lactic acid out of the muscles after a workout which aides in lessening stiffness and soreness.
I have encountered the horrible syndrome of overtraining and do not want to go back there!!

Working out every day is fine as long as you have at least one day where all you are doing is moving. You are not getting your heartrate up to even your lowest day's workout. All you are doing is just moving - walk slowly/breath deeply, enjoy the day, go for a short swim.

If your workouts are at a lower heartrate and slower pace day after day, you may be fine; but still, please research the signs of overtraining.

What I encountered in overtraining was painful workouts, shortness of temper post workout, dehydration signs with 100+oz of water a day, trouble sleeping, muscle fatigue on even easy workouts. Later on, there was the difficulty of getting back into the workouts after the sheer exhaustion took over. These are just some of the symptoms, so I urge people to read up on it - it is very real!
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