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Why does my heel hurt?


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Hi all,

so I've just started back at the gym, and over the past couple of days I've developed a very sharp pain the the bottom of my right heel. It's the worst when I first wake up, and/or if I'm stilling for a long period and then get up.

 

It's only in the one heel and has become so painful that it hurts to walk. Any ideas what this might be, and if there's anything I can do about it? It seems too mundane to spend a saturday waiting in a walk in clinic for!

Thanks for any advice!

11 Replies (last)

Thanks so much! This appears to be my issue!

I have plantar fascitis also and I went to a dr. He put shots in my foot.  very painful and didn't help.  Went to a chiropractor and he used some type of sonergram on my foot and that helped but I think what helped the most was easy spirit shoes. 

The reason I think it is the  easy spirit shoes that worked for me is because I was in the hospital with my son a few weeks ago and was walking around in socks and my foot started to hurt again so I wear my shoes even in the house now and  the pain is gone again.

I hope this helps you

I know how painful it is to have plantar fascitis.

I gave up exercise for a while and ended up gaining about 20 pounds.  So don't wait to long to find out what works for you.

Good luck

 

#4  
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I've had plantar fascitis and its really painful. The best cure I found is taping the foot.

Try this link for how to tape your foot.

http://heelspurs.com/tape.html

Its the cheapest and best way, but you may need to tape your foot for some time before it goes away. It takes awhile for the inflammation to go down. When you walk on your foot first thing in the morning take it gently as too much pressure can keep reinjuring it. Try gently stretching your foot first thing by hanging by the toes from a step, but make it really gentle when you do that. The taping supports the tendon and allows it too heal. Really, keeping it taped all the time is the best cure. 

Sounds like Plantar Fasciitis to me too. I experienced this recently after running too much too soon.

Stretches are key to recovering, as well as RICE - rest, ice, compression, and elevation. For me, I didn't really "rest" much, but I avoided activities that worsened the pain such as running or jumping. I also bought Dr. Scholl's Heel Pain insoles and they have really helped too.

I got PF too from walking in cheap shoes - so first get your rear to the nearest store and invest in a good pair of workout shoes with good arch support.

Because I put off going to a dr for so long about my pain when I finally did go I had to get the cortisone shot plus he taped the foot and then had custom orthoitcs made.  After 2 years of wearing the orthotics I am happy to say my foot is better but I still can't walk inclines. ( develeoped shinsplints too because of the way I was favoring my feet when walking) 

Take an anti inflammatory ( aleve, advil ) do some stretching exercises ( search pf on webmd for those) and  a great way to ice it is to take a water bottle freeze it and then roll your foot over it back and forth.

Also walmart sells these socks fromo danskin that have little arch support built into the socks. They are great.

 

it may be pf but do have a dr check to see that it's not a bone spur.  the treatment is different.

I've had it - best thing I can recommend is taping it:

http://www.heel-that-pain.com/plantar_fasciit is/taping/plantar_fasciitis_taping.php

The nice part is althetic tape costs about $1.50.  When you've got the tape off, stretch your foot too:

http://www.aafp.org/afp/20051201/2237_f1.jpg

Those together did wonders for my foot - it healed right up in about two weeks (to my surprise).

Edit: On a side note, I was able to continue weight lifting through it - squats, etc. - with some good squishy shoes on.

I don't know if your problem is plantar fasciitis.  I've had it in both my heels...sometimes while walking but mostly when I was standing for long hours on my feet.  I went to a podiatrist and he gave me shoe inserts, which worked like charms.  I don't seem to have PF anymore.  I was heavier then and walking very heavily (meaning I plodded).  Better arch support in shoes and treatment for the disease that made me plod seemed to work.  Losing weight couldn't have hurt either.

Bottom line see a doctor before you start "self medicating"...meaning tape or otc drugs.  What works for others may not work for you.

I have plantar fasciitis; a gift in the form of an overuse injury from my days teaching aerobics.  I found that it particularly flares up when I gain/lose a lot of weight - in your case, it would be due to unexpected exercise.

What it is is an inflamation of the sheet of muscle that runs along the sole of your foot.  It inflames, and then pulls everything that it attaches to.  Notably, the muscle is attached to the heel of your foot.  But sometimes, it gets so inflamed that it pulls so much on the muscle that, since the heel is also attached to the achilles tendon, that is affected as well.  (Ow ow ow ow ow - THAT is the WORST when it happens to me)

  My husband works in the biomedical industry, and got me a brace to wear on my foot at night - it keeps the foot in a "neutral" position, and I don't wake up hobbling around for the first half hour of the morning - the sharp pain in the heel is gone.

A chiropractor, podiatrist, or physical therapist will be able to help you.  Courses of action are orthotics, a brace, calf & ankle exercises, or physical therapist.  I saw a physical therapist for a while, referred by my podiatrist.  It was lovely.  Some light, manageable stretches and exercise, followed by 15 minutes of her rubbing my feet!  Mmmmm.

I also found that losing weight helps, too.  But sometimes, it just takes your body getting used to the change in your routine or body weight.

Hope this helps!

Hello

I have had bone spurs in both heels before, and seem to be common for very large people doing high impact aerobics, or walking/on the feet for many miles a day. Fortunately heel spurs can be diagnosed with an x-ray, giving you a definite yes or no with a visual of severity. If you are completely off your feet for a few days they "heel" haha. Unfortunately the "on the feet" treatment is possibly expensive orthopedic shoes and physiotherapy. The worst-case scenario is surgery (though extremely rare cases)

Get a better pair of shoes, and don't skimp! The pain in the wallet will hurt less than the pain in your feet, I assure you. Go for extreme high-impact shoes that will take the pressure. Start small in the beginning of your weight loss, to slowly condition your bones and joints, working your way up to high impact and extended walking/running.

If you have a job that is constantly on your feet, you might want to look into swimming or eliptical trainers for alternative low-impact weight loss solutions. Jazzercise aerobic classes (available across North America) have a fabulous system.

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