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Insanely high resting heart rate?


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I just bought a heart rate monitor today. I have cycled 20 km today, burning alltogether 400 calories. I dont know if this is normal after a good day of exercising, but my resting heart rate (when Im sitting and doing really nothing) is 96-111. Also, my monitor is telling me that I have burnt 650 calories in 3 and a half hours of just living. Sitting, walking around slowly, walking the stairs and a few short but fast spurts. Can this be for real? 650 calories burned and heart beating 100 bpm by doing nothing?

Im a 15-year old girl, 5'2 and 101 lb

 

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Were you riding really hard and fast on your bike ride.  I do not have heart rate monitor, but know that my heart rate can take a good while to come down when I really push myself very hard mountain biking.  Last time I went, I rode for about 50 minutes very hard, essentially 50 minutes of HIIT, and my heart rate stayed elevated for at least 2-3 hours afterwards.

Well, yes. There were lots of hills, and sometimes getting up those made me feel so exhausted I felt like throwing up... But then again, there were lots of downhills also.

So now it's been 4 hours since I put the HRM on. Doing just normal everyday activities I have burned 750 calories. My average heart rate is 100. This would mean I burned 100 calories in an hour just by sitting at the computer. Really? All the calculators on the internet tell me I burn 180 calories by riding my bike for 40 mins...

Most heart rate monitors aren't really calibrated to give you an accurate count of calories burned outside of exercise.

 If you've calibrated it correctly it should be roughly accurate for when you're working out (though Behanna thinks most HRM's are overly optimistic when it comes to calories expended on bike rides) but it won't be correct for what you're burning sitting down. You need a Bodybugg for that; and even then it's only a reasonably accurate approximation.

Have you tried manually taking your heartrate/pulse per minute?  You know, the old index and middle finger to wrist or neck, count the beats for a minute (or 30 seconds and multiply by 2)?  That would give you an idea if what the HRM is reading is correct.

Yes, I checked it manually and I got the exact same result...

I have been thinking about this and even asked my PE teacher. Could this be because of
a) My (maybe exessive? up to 200 mg a day) caffeine intake? I drink about 1,3 liters of either ED or diet pepsi a day.
b) Im a recovering anorexic. Could it be that Im going through "the refeeding syndrome?"
c) I AM active, I run almost everywhere, always use the stairs, do a lot of strength training by carrying stuff (groceries etc.) upstairs. We live on the 4th floor
d) I could be hyperthyrodic, I remember my doctor mentioning it when I was 8 yrs old

Today I wore the HRM all day long and my hr never dropped below 88. I tried to relax and everything but nothing helped. Even if I jerked my feet a little my hr would get up to 114!!

Im really worried about this... :(

Resting heart rate is taken in bed before rising or even sitting up first thing after waking.

Original Post by trhawley:

Resting heart rate is taken in bed before rising or even sitting up first thing after waking.

Well okay, but is it normal to have a heart rate of 100 when youre sitting down, standing etc...?

Oh, and by the way... Does this mean I really AM burning more calories than I would if I had a lower HR? (Im not believeing the numbers the HRM is giving me for slow walking or sitting. I CAN'T be burning 250 calories in 2 hrs of doing nothing can I?

Your heart rate depends on too many factors, such as what you've been doing before you sat down, what you've eaten, your fitness level, etc. for anyone to make any judgement based on that one incidence alone.

And no, a your heart rate while at rest has nothing to do with calories burned.  That is why a heart rate monitor cannot be used to determine a total daily calorie burn.  It can be used to estimate calories burned during activity, just like the charts on this site and others, but to assume that it is more accurate than the charts is a mistake a lot of people make.

You are trying to use a heart rate monitor to do something that it is not designed to do and is not capable of doing.

So should I see a doctor? What should I do?

BTW; I read more about this and I figured it could be because of low hemoglobine (?). My HB was just fine the last time it was checked though.

You should schedule a doctor's appointment just in case. I have periodic tachycardia which is essentially an excessively fast heart beat which would seem to be what you have. In my case I'm young and the accelerated pace is benign and is causing no adverse health effects. I have a prescription for beta blockers just in case but I have never taken them.

When you go to the doctors they will probably first hook you to their office EKG machine and check your rhythm there. Mine was off so I was sent to a cardiologist who had me wear a heart monitor for a couple days and they found occasionally my heart doesn't send the correct signals which is why it beats too fast. Its not something to worry about in my case and I've rarely even noticed it.

Original Post by ridinwarmwinds:

You should schedule a doctor's appointment just in case. I have periodic tachycardia which is essentially an excessively fast heart beat which would seem to be what you have. In my case I'm young and the accelerated pace is benign and is causing no adverse health effects. I have a prescription for beta blockers just in case but I have never taken them.

When you go to the doctors they will probably first hook you to their office EKG machine and check your rhythm there. Mine was off so I was sent to a cardiologist who had me wear a heart monitor for a couple days and they found occasionally my heart doesn't send the correct signals which is why it beats too fast. Its not something to worry about in my case and I've rarely even noticed it.

I think I'll see my school nurse next Tuesday.

Yesterday my HR got "as low as" 77. But I know even that is too much.

One other thing that could cause this passed my mind... Could it be overtraining? I returned to school just this week and I cycle there 10 km every morning with very high intensity. I started a pretty hard exercise regime out of the blue, and could this all mean that my body just needs to get some rest?

You see, my HR and BP were just fine, normal, when I was at  my doc this monday. On tuesday I started my exercise regime and have experienced these problems ever since.

I've wondered and worried about this too because I have the same 'problem'. Doctors have essentially told me not to worry about my high resting heart rate. In my case I feel it is linked to anxiety....iI wonder whether this is a possible explanation? Would people with, for instance, generalized anxiety disorder have (ultimately benignly) high resting heart rates?

Original Post by ieevee:

Yesterday my HR got "as low as" 77. But I know even that is too much.

 I am not sure why you say this is too much.  Was this number taken before you got out of bed in the morning? 

If you took this number after getting out of bed and then strapping on the HRM your heart is already above a resting rate.  If you took this number while doing anything that wasnt absolutely resting, ie BEFORE you get out of bed, 77 is perfectly normal.

For example:  When I take my heart rate before I get out of bed I get 60 bpm.  If I take my heart rate watching tv, I typically get around 74 pbm.  Thats a big difference even though both activities can be considered "resting".

 

 

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