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Jogging/running with bad knees...how do you do it?


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I used to jog pretty often (about 20 miles a week) but after doing this for 2 years or so I started to have problems with my knees. My doctor told me that it is because my knee caps do not slide in their grooves--I think he called it Patellar displacement--it is painful, and I don't like it! Anyway I had to stop running and start physical therapy, that got too expensive $30 co-pay 3 times a week--I had to quit!

Three years later I still have some problems with my knees but I want to start jogging again...so I was wondering if anyone has problems with their knees and do you still jog? I was considering getting knee braces from CVS, but is it worth it? I have a super pair of running shoes that I just bought, I also have orthotics (made by my doctor to help keep my knees aligned) that I can use. Any other suggestions? I really hope that I can start jogging again without any problems...jogging gave me the best workout I have ever gotten. Thanks for all your help!
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I don't know if you want to do this, but you could try power walking.  It is a lot less stressful on the knees.  It has been giving me a pretty good workout.
If I had bad knees or had a previous bad injury I would not be running.

I would power walk... and if that wasn't enough I'd use some 1 to 2 pound free weights to help get my heart into the fat burning zone.

If you want to go into it gung ho anway, try to limit yourself to 35min and do one of the interval running programs that build you up to running.   The Learning to Run program here is what I used.   IF you just start seriously running again even with knee braces and new shoes and so on you could very easily hurt your knees again.   So if you insist on trying this... then do the Learning to Run thread's program that deejlb has going and at the first sign of kn ee pain.. stop.
I'm not sure it's such a great idea to jog/run if you have knee pain. If the pain is caused by something other than overuse/injury, then it's probably a permanent thing - and running will just aggrevate it. You might try something low impact, like the elliptical trainer. I find I get a similar workout (increased heartrate, good sweat etc.) and the motion of the trainer is much more gentle on your joints.
I have flat feet and I really like the eliptical over the treadmill.  I can last almost 3-5 times longer because of the low impact.
Did you ever ask the physical therapist or your orthopeidic doctor if you could go running?  I understand about the money for the physical therapist.  When I started having knee problems I went to the physical therapist once.  I memorized the excerises coupled with exercises from internet searches and recommendations from those at the specialty running store that had the same problem.  Together with new running shoes I am fine.  Though problems happen every now and then when I work too hard.  Start out slow and if it hurts...stop.  And again if you have questions ask your doctor.  It took me a year to run again and it was when I finally bought the right running shoes and strenghten the right muscles that did the trick.  I had a different problem than you though (Iliotibial band syndrome).  From a quick internet search it looks like you should strenghten your quads.  here is more information   I think you should be able to run again but if your knees are hurting without running I wouldnt start running. 
Thanks so much guys, you have given me some great tips.
I knew an older gentleman who use to love love love running.  But the doc said he was going to have to have both knees replaced.  So he switched to biking and rollerblading and never looked back.  he is know 64 and still participates in bike and rollerblading marathons.  Running is hard on the body, it might just be time to find another hobby.  Serious biking can be awesome and rollerblading is super fun.
Oh and my friend never had to get knee replacements after he switched from running.
#9  
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For years I used to run cross-country and track, and play soccer year-round with the same knee problem you have (patellofemoral symdrome) and it was brutal. I actually had surgery on both of my knees to try to correct it and the further problems that it caused, and 8 years later I'm still struggling to do what I used to be able to. My suggestion to you is to really work on strengthening the right muscles before you jump into running. You need to strengthen your VMO (part of your quad) and this is what you should have been doing while you were in physical therapy. You can find exercises for it online or you can ask a PT specialist/orthopedic doctor. Also, start slowly when you do start running. You won't be able to do what you used to, so don't try. You may even have to walk/jog for a while before you can jog the whole time. Start slow and with short distances because otherwise you will only aggravate it and it will never work. As far as the knee braces go, standard store-bought braces simply do not help with this problem. I had to buy special ones that cost about $70 a piece and are specifically designed to direct your knee cap in the right direction. Or there's also a fancy method of taping them that a physical therapist should be able to show you how to do. I did that for a long time, too. It probably wouldn't hurt if you could find a store where they can diagnose any abnormalities in your running gait to make sure that you have the best possible shoes for you. I hope this info helps, and I wish you the best of luck.
#10  
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at the end of my 6th grade year i begun to have this problem up until now. so for six years on and off i have been on crutches and so far my knees have been behaving. so i have decided to begin working out regularly so i can participate in activities. i started by building my quads and calf muscles. basically contueing the exercises i recieved while in physical therapy. now im am begging to run. i looked up "how to start running" via google, and it gives you different methods on how to start up running again. 

 

Soo build your legs muscles and gradually begin to run/jog again!  

I use to dislocate my knee caps all of the time, I got to the point where I could pop them back in myself. The one thing that has made all of the difference is lifting weights.  I noticed that my knees actually felt stronger, I am no longer scared to turn a certain way and dislocate them.  When I was only running, I popped them out every couple of months, now that I am lifting and running only once or twice a week it happens maybe once every couple of years. (and usually it is when I haven't been lifting).

McConnell Taping is supposed to help for Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

In that video on taping, the author mentions lack of activation in the muscle on the "inside of the knee." Sometimes, before I run (or do squats), I "activate" the Vastus Medialis by tapping on that muscle with my knuckle while doing leg extensions. I keep my leg mostly straight while doing this, and it is easily done without a machine (sit on a table, with a weighted bag hanging from your ankle). Tipping your foot slightly to the outside also forces that muscle to take more of the load. Don't go all the way down, as this can make the problem worse.

This helps me. The kneecap pain comes back over time if I stop doing it.

Another thing that might help is to run on a treadmill in front of a full length mirror to see if there is something about your stride that might be causing the problem.

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