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Jogging? Running? What's the difference?


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I've often wondered: what's the difference between jogging & running? Is it just the speed? If so, at what speed do you go from jogging to running? Just wondering because I run almost every day and have a pace of about 9 min/mile and wonder if I'm jogging or running. I guess in the end, it doesn't really matter, as long as I'm exercising. Thanks!

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You're right, it doesn't really matter.  I think the difference is speed, and mindset, but the terms are pretty much interchangeable in my opinion .  A jog for a seasoned runner may be a run for a beginning runner....ie. a 9 min mile may be considered a "jogging pace" for someone who can log a few miles at a 6 min mile pace...but it could be considered a "running pace" for someone who pushes themselves hard to get to that speed.

That's how I see it at least :)

I'd say you're running at a 9 min/mile.

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I remember looking up calories burned (a long time ago from book sources) and one source specified 11min/mi as jogging.  10mi/mi or under was running.  Guess I had the same question, so the answer stuck out in my head.

IDK what the actual cut off is but I like maxx's answer.(

I think it depends on how much you exert yourself... I'm 5'2 and I run about a 9 minute mile pace too, (approx. 6.7 mph)

My boyfriend however is 6'2 and 6.7mph to him may be considered jogging cuz his legs are like a foot longer then mine so he has a much greater stride then me

but hey as long as you are continually challenging yourself, then it's perfectly fine. I think a 9 min mile is great!!

 

 

When I started running in the late 1970's, anything slower than 8 minute miles was considered "jogging." I happen to remember the number, because I was right on the line at 8 min. miles for my first couple 10K races. Later came the exercise craze and everybody wanted to do marathons and triathlons. Races had a lot more people in them and the average pace got a lot slower. Now, I hear 10 minute miles (or slower) used sometimes as the divide between jogging and running.

From a physical standpoint, I always thought somebody that was a little too relaxed, maybe slapping their feet and plodding/bouncing along was "jogging," while "runners" kept a better posture and didn't bob up and down so much. That definition doesn't relate directly to speed. For me, it seemed a purely subjective thing.

I think the two are used interchangeably mostly, running/jogging depends on whatthe person wants to say, I say I go running, I go fairly fast so I am probably right [I do like a 6/7 min mile and Im like 5'5] but I used to say I went jogging when I did the same thing, I just feel more sporty saying running =P

hey, i think a lot of people on here have it right; saying it depends on the person.

for me, a jog is 8.0 miles per hour or about a 7:30 pace.

and easy run is about 7 minute pace

and a run is about 6:30! but thats just me, everybody different, and depends on how much you train (: it mainly matters that your are doing it!

Jogging was term invented by the elitist to separate themselves from the masses of (slow) people that were invading their sport.  People just aren't happy unless things are organized, classified, and stereotyped.

So, in a word, the entire difference between jogging and running is:  mental :-)

yeah, it's personal.  i push myself pretty hard most of the time, but when i run with my friend barb, it's definitely a jog for me.  it's kind-of refreshing.  i mean, nothing makes me want to run 15k quite like an easy 50+ minute 8k.

50+ min for 8k Surprised i think i'd walk faster!!!

Original Post by fidget84:

50+ min for 8k  i think i'd walk faster!!!

yeah, you're a superhero.

5k in 25-30 minutes is supposed to be fairly average for starting runners.

At least, that's what I've heard.

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