Fitness
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Hi everyone. I just started running last month. Start weight 282.2. When I started walking 2.5 miles was a lot and I was sore for days. I have built up to an 80% jog/20 run 5k pace of about 38 minutes. My longest run was 7.1 miles last Sunday. I'm trying to do one long run a week either on Sat or Sunday.  Right now I run 4-5 times a week. Today my weight is 255 :)  Running started out as part of my weightloss journey (goal of 212)  but now it's really becoming a personal challenge to see if I can build up to do a 7K in march and an 8k in April (part of the marathon and half marathon route but I'm only doing the 7k since I am just starting).

My question is 5k in 38 minutes going to make the laughing stock of the runners at this race?  I will actually be doing a 7k so I anticipate if I can hold pace I'm set for a 00:53:12 pace. My obvious goal is 7k in under an hour which although not great is a good goal in my eyes. (secretly I do not want to be in the bottom 5-10% of the pack when I cross the finish line)

I have never ran a race before and will enjoy the accomplishment of completing it as much as anything else but I battle my inner competitive athlete that wants to be a winner (I know that will never happen which is why I am setting small goals that I can 'win' at).

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No you will not be a laughing stock. You are not going to win the race but you will not be the slowest person either.

Enjoy it

Sucess is finishing for your first race. After that sucess is doing better each time

 

 

I'm 21 and reasonably fit but you beat my 5k time by 9 mins! Your gonna do just fine, good luck. :)

Original Post by brian702lose:

secretly I do not want to be in the bottom 5-10% of the pack when I cross the finish line

See if you can find results from this race in past years (here might be a good start) and see where you stack up.

BTW I forgot to mention I am currently running outside and it is cold air (around 20-30 degrees F)  Does anyone know if I will suffer more do find it easier if it warms up a bit?

Thanks for your replies so far. I appreciate them.

hmal734933915- Thanks for the confidence.  I'm trying to get better at this and push myself. I find myself picking landmarks to get to and once I make them I try to keep going.  The last .2 miles I make myself run A LOT faster to push myself and it's really been paying off. Feeling better each run?

Original Post by brian702lose:

BTW I forgot to mention I am currently running outside and it is cold air (around 20-30 degrees F)  Does anyone know if I will suffer more do find it easier if it warms up a bit?

Thanks for your replies so far. I appreciate them.

hmal734933915- Thanks for the confidence.  I'm trying to get better at this and push myself. I find myself picking landmarks to get to and once I make them I try to keep going.  The last .2 miles I make myself run A LOT faster to push myself and it's really been paying off. Feeling better each run?

There are plenty of people who work and play that hard in that kind of cold.  You're hardcore!  I won't run outside unless it's 38F+ degrees.

It sounds like you're doing well and since you're a new runner it's better to start off slow as to not injure yourself. 

I've been running solo 5k's for a year now (with three months off for knee inflammation of sorts) and I've only shaved 4 minutes off of my 5k.  I'm just happy to be running though as I LOVE running and how it makes me feel.

Keep up the good work!

 

You won't be last, but running has become pretty popular over the last 40 years, so there are a lot of good runners. My brother has been running a long time, and he enters races frequently. His 5K time is less than half of yours, yet he rarely wins a race. Even little local races without too many people, he'll be in front of the crowd but he won't place. I wouldn't worry about where you end up in the pack.

 

Does anyone know if I will suffer more or find it easier if it warms up a bit? Starting in cold will it be a bad adjustment to warm weather?

Yes you should warm up. Jog around before the race starts. Also, it is usually better if you are conservative in your estimated race times. Your starting position depends on your estimate of how fast you can finish. For some reason people always choose a fast time, but then they end up getting in people's way. And getting passed by others for the entire race, which can be demoralizing. If you choose a slower time, you will be doing the passing.

 

really appreciate the advice on that solid however I was speaking of the temperature warming up and how the body processes warmer air easier than colder air.  I started training in 20-30 degree weather. How will my body adjust to taking in air of a warmer temperature. I assume an April race will be alot warmer than 20-30 degree and more in the 50-60 degree range.

 

However I'm glad you answered that way because I never thought of picking a lower time so I could 'pass' people. What a good motivating feeling.

Well the other thing is you will continue training so well are you getting faster because it is warmer or because of training probably 99.98 because of training and 0.02% because easier to breath when warmer

 

I find it much harder to run in the cold, my lungs/body doesn't seem to like sucking in large batches of cold air while I am running.  I think it will get easier for you to run as it gets warmer and your body isn't working as hard to stay warm.  You may even run faster or longer when it gets warmer.  Just my experience, not scientific at all!

I prefer to run in the cold, if only I didn't have to bundle up so much. Getting dressed in the winter is such a process.

 

Original Post by brian702lose:

I was speaking of the temperature warming up and how the body processes warmer air easier than colder air

Oh, got it now. Yeah, I find it a lot easier to run at 55 degrees than if it is very hot or cold.

Thanks for the responses guys. I wasn't sure if I would see a benefit or a loss in the warmer weather.

mjsophia- I agree it is a process. Especially at 4:45 am in a dark bedroom (to keep from waking the wife, and our 7 week old baby who is sleeping in the basenet at the foot of the bed).  I lay everything out the night before in a pile.  If I wake up and after sleeping thru my alarm (or turning it off without remembering) I will feel super guilty since that pile of clothes is just sitting there looking at me.

(On a funny side note. I once,during a snooze alarm, dreamed my clothes stood up from their pile and started screaming at me like a drill sargent in the movie to get my lazy bleeped bleep out of bed and get dressed and go run. It was like you went thru all the trouble of stacking me in this pile I'll be darned (gotta keep it pc) if you don't get dressed and go)

Original Post by brian702lose:

(On a funny side note. I once,during a snooze alarm, dreamed my clothes stood up from their pile and started screaming at me like a drill sargent in the movie to get my lazy bleeped bleep out of bed and get dressed and go run. It was like you went thru all the trouble of stacking me in this pile I'll be darned (gotta keep it pc) if you don't get dressed and go)

Dang I need my workout clothes to start doing that!

It was enough of a dream to keep me from hitting the snooze button for 3 days in a row.  I still laugh about it when I think about it and it's been almost a month.

In my opinion, you need to cut your running volume. You're new to the sport, you're relatively heavy, and something's going to give. I know everything feels great now, but don't be the guy who gets a little twinge which turns into a stress fracture. I'd say you should be doing 3-4 days/week and no more than 6 miles for your long run (and even that's pushing it).

Now that that's out of the way, well done so far. You probably won't be last, but even if you are, you're still ahead of all the people who never got off the couch, and there will still be people cheering you on at the finish line. And I can appreciate the inner competitive spirit, but you'll probably find that it gets recalibrated, and you start competing with your old self. Which is really cool for the first few years.

Re: temperature, it's actually preferable to race when it's cooler (my 5 mile PR was set in 20°F with a light wind). This allows you to hold your pace higher because your body is able to cool itself much easier. My only personal limitations are that I wear pants below 40°F during training (keeps my knees and ankles from complaining) and I need a scarf below 10°F to breathe through.

Original Post by cnichols2000:

In my opinion, you need to cut your running volume. You're new to the sport, you're relatively heavy, and something's going to give. I know everything feels great now, but don't be the guy who gets a little twinge which turns into a stress fracture. I'd say you should be doing 3-4 days/week and no more than 6 miles for your long run (and even that's pushing it).

So you think running/walking 4-5 a week is too much? Really?  I thought 2-3 days of rest a week was plenty in the early stages of training. Also note the 7.1 miler was not a run but about a 40 percent run 60 percent walk. Longest true run without any walking spell (even 100 yards of walking) is about 1.5 miles. This morning I ran 1.5 miles, walked 100 yards (estimated) and ran .75 miles then walked another hundred yards and then ran the last .75 miles.  I'm building up to where I can run my 3.2 mile course I have mapped out completely without stopping.  If I can get to where 3.2 isn't that bad then I can move up to my 4.5 mile course until it's runable without a walk and then move up to my 6.1 mile course and so on..  This might not be the best plan but it's what i'm working with at the moment. Sorta like interval training but I'm picking 'landmarks' to push myself towards.

 

Now that that's out of the way, well done so far. You probably won't be last, but even if you are, you're still ahead of all the people who never got off the couch, and there will still be people cheering you on at the finish line. And I can appreciate the inner competitive spirit, but you'll probably find that it gets recalibrated, and you start competing with your old self. Which is really cool for the first few years.

I know I won't be last since there will be people walking this as well, but I don't want to be the last runner. I guess if I am oh well and it's a start.  I have seen the comrottery that surronds running and how it's really a race against your own best. I love how everyone encourages each other and pushes each other. I train by myself so I know that running with people will encourage me to pick up the pace and I am going to my best to resist this until the finish line is within striking distance.

Re: temperature, it's actually preferable to race when it's cooler (my 5 mile PR was set in 20°F with a light wind). This allows you to hold your pace higher because your body is able to cool itself much easier. My only personal limitations are that I wear pants below 40°F during training (keeps my knees and ankles from complaining) and I need a scarf below 10°F to breathe through.

Definitely have never experienced sub 10°F temps yet but that should be fun. I always wear warm pants and 3-4 shirts including 2 long sleeves *usually a long sleeve t and a heavy sweatshirt*. 

I'm contemplating getting an mp3 player to accompany me and keep me pushing to be better. It's nice to clear your head while running but about mile 2 it would be nice to have some uptemp motivative music in my ears with songs like

Fight for your right to party and I'm sexy and I know it (horrible music is a guilty pleasure of mine)

 

at a triathlon I did three years ago, the last finisher came in during the awards ceremony 10-15 minutes behind everybody else.  He got the most and the loudest cheers.

Just do it.

It sounds like your off to a fantastic start with running!

38 min is a perfectly reasonable 5k time.  Any runner who would put you down for that time is a jackass and should be noted as such and ignored.  (am I allowed to say jackass on the forum?)

50-60 degrees is pretty optimal running weather.  I'd expect that to work well for you.

Music can be very motivational - my advice:  you probably don't want to turn in on too early in the run.  A common beginner mistake to make is to start too fast, and listening to music will make you run faster.  Save the music until you get to around 1.5 or 2 miles and it starts to get hard.

Enjoy your run!

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