Fitness
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Lifting free weights, rapid weight gain!!


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Hi,

My name is Marie and I'm new to this site.  Hopefully being responsible for everything I eat and do will help me lose weight.  About a month ago  I added free weights 3 days a week with my cardio ( I do cardio every day). I gained a whooping 8 lbs!!! My pants arent looser, but I do feel stronger. Can anyone explain this rapid weight gain. I'm wondering if I should stop lifting???

Thanks,

Marie

11 Replies (last)

Muscle weighs more than fat, so your 8 lb gain is most likely all muscle since you're losing the fat. Keep it up! Free weights are great for core strength and toning.

Muscle does not weigh more than fat.  1 lb = 1 lb.  Muscle is more dense than fat causing fat to take up more space than muscle.  It would be pretty remarkable for you to gain 8 lbs of muscle in one month.  If you gained 8 lbs of muscle in one month, I would pay to know your secret, as would millions more.  The most likely cause would be from water retention in your muscles to help with repairing them.  I'm sure someone, like Melkor, may have a more technical explanation.  It's not a bad thing.  Weight lifting has helped me tremendously in working on attaining my goals.  Keep up the great work.

Definitly don't stop. Most of it is going to be water anyway, though a little muscle, as posted above, when you work out, your muscles hold onto more water. . First time lifters are especially prone to this. I promise you won't keep this pace up, and in any case it's not "bad weight" assuming your diet is under control.

Your body will retain more water when you start lifting weights.  That is where about 70% of the weight gain is coming from.  It's impossible to gain 8 lbs of muscle in a month.  5 lbs muscle is considered a good gain per month for guys on steroids.

Think of it this way... do you honestly think lifting free weights is making you fatter or in any worse shape?  No... then who cares what the number on the scale is because if it isn't hurting you, it's helping.

Muscle does not weigh more than fat.  1 lb = 1 lb.  Muscle is more dense than fat causing fat to take up more space than muscle. 

Technically the first part is correct, but if you're going to be that caught up on semantics, you can't say fat takes up more space than muscle, either, 1 cubic inch of muscle takes up the same volume as 1 cubic inch of fat. Besides, when people talk of extrinsic varibles (those which are dependent on how much stuff you are measuring, such as mass or volume) as intrinsic varibles (those which do not matter how much stuff you have, such as density),  it is generally understood that all other extrinsic varibles are equal.
#6  
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Hi Marie,

I’m also new to this site as of today. I would like to encourage you to keep lifting weights. It’s probably the best thing you can do for weight loss and health.

Cardio is fantastic for the heart and is good for weight loss, but it’s the weight lifting that has the best effect on reshaping the body as well as speeding the rate at which you burn calories even when at rest. Muscle is like comparing a rock to a sponge, it takes up less space in the body but it weights more. After the age of 25 women loose about 1 pound of lean muscle mass each year; so if you are not lifting weights you will start to look flabby or even gain even if you have not changed your diet.

I don’t know how often you weight yourself but I personally try not to weight myself too often because the scale is a crude measure of our weight, not taking into consideration, body fat percentage vs muscle, water bones etc… your brain alone weights 10 pounds.

In my experience I have found it more beneficial to let my conscience be my guide as to weather or not I am being true to my new lifestyle. If you are, then do not let the scale judge you.

Keep up the good work!

 

#7  
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I guess I should stop weighing myself. I do feel better, but the numbers on the scale are depressing. When you say first time weight lifters, how long does this phase last. Will I eventually start losing inches, and not weight? Thanks

Muscle weighs more than fat. When you're weight training you can't pay as close attention to the scale, but more to how your close fit. After a while, you will notice everything toning up. My trainer suggest doing a light warm up (brisk walk, light job for about 5-10 min) before weight training and then do your extensive cardio afterwards. Your cardio is more productive doing it this way. I didn't believe him at first, but I've been proven wrong!

Let me correct myself and the rest of us that have obviously bought into the myth... after reading what SMARTJOCK256 had to say, he's correct. Muscle DOESN'T weigh more than fat.... however, "Muscle is heavier by volume than fat."

 

I found the info on this website. Sorry for giving the wrong information. It's just something that I (along with a lot of other people) have always been told.

 

 http://www.onemorebite-weightloss.com/muscle- to-fat.html

It's a matter of semantics that I won't usually bring up unless someone else does. I think most people understand that when someone says "This substance weighs more than that" they are talking about density, weight per volume. And I'll even say muscle is heavier than fat, when I'm talking about density, but it's that type of usuage that makes the riddle "what weighs more, a lb of feathers, or a lb of lead" tricky at first though.

Point I'm trying to make, it's not something to get hung up about, in everyday langauge I think it's clear what's intended, I just think it's funny when people point out that a pound of muscle weighs the same as a pound of fat, and then go on to say that muscle takes up less space than fat. Well then, that is the same thing. Ok, I'm tired and rambling, so all that's probably not clear at all, but oh well, sorry, good night :P
#11  
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Original Post by anderds1:

Muscle does not weigh more than fat.  1 lb = 1 lb.  Muscle is more dense than fat causing fat to take up more space than muscle.  It would be pretty remarkable for you to gain 8 lbs of muscle in one month.  If you gained 8 lbs of muscle in one month, I would pay to know your secret, as would millions more.  The most likely cause would be from water retention in your muscles to help with repairing them.  I'm sure someone, like Melkor, may have a more technical explanation.  It's not a bad thing.  Weight lifting has helped me tremendously in working on attaining my goals.  Keep up the great work.

 

You are wrong on both points. Correct, mass is mass and one pound is one pound. But our society (and most human beings) perceive weight by density and quantity; two given materials of the same quantity but with different densities are perceived as weighing different amounts. An iron screwdriver feels heavier than a titanium screwdriver.

Therefore, since muscle is more dense than fat, muscle weighs more than fat, given the same quantities.

Secondly, it is not remarkable to gain 8lbs of muscle in one month. Through high intensity training, correct calorie intake, and rest periods you can gain at least 5 lbs of muscle in a month. The biggest factor of course, being a VERY high calorie diet.

 

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