Fitness
Moderators: melkor


What muscles are best trained together in one session?


Quote  |  Reply

I've been doing cardio and HIIT for nearly 3 months now, and lifting heavy (for me) usually twice a week for 2 months. However I'd like to stop weight training the whole body in one session, and instead train different muscles on different sessions.

So what muscles are best trained together?

13 Replies (last)

All of them. Better to train movements, rather than "different muscles." Our muscles like to work together, not separately. Our body's muscles are pretty selfless, and prefer to share the load. So to answer your question...

Upper body: Pushing movement, uses arms (triceps) (forearm) shoulders, upper back if you pull your shoulders back, legs and rest of core to stabilize.

Pulling movement, uses arms (biceps) (forearm) shoulders, back, legs and rest of core to stabilize.

Lower body: Pushing movement, like a squat, uses quads, glutes, hams if you go low, shoulders and/or upper back depending on type of squat, and calves and shins and core to stabilize.

Pulling, like a deadlift, uses hams, glutes, quads, back and front of core and shins and calves to stabilize. Plus the forearms to grip the bar.

Original Post by bmx419:

All of them.

Literally the words I came in here to say. Also, Starting Strength. Maybe not the most interesting program in the world, but it works like you wouldn't believe. If you're able to squat 3x/week and add a little bit of weight each workout, it makes zero sense for you to move to a split routine.

Don't be afraid of a simple program.

If you really want to split it up, either go upper/lower or push/pull

Splits don't necessarily mean isolation work, nothing wrong with a good split routine IMO:

You could try Push, Pull, Legs

So something like

Push: Bench Press, Ovehead Press, Dips or Skullcrushers

Pull: Deadlifts, Rows, Chin/Pull Ups

Legs: Squats, Leg Press, Leg Curls

 

Another popular split is:

Chest/Triceps

Back/Bi's

Legs/Shoulders

 

Personally I prefer the push, pull, legs approach. I will be moving on to the following set up soon:

Push: Incline Bench, CGBP, Skullcrushers

Pull: Deadlifts, Rows, Curls

Legs: Squat, Leg Press, Leg Curl

 

Good luck with your goals mate.

There's nothing wrong with the push/pull/squat split, but it's probably not the best thing for a novice. Most people benefit from getting more frequency. Why do you want to split it up?

 

I want to split it up because I'd like to do perhaps 4 or 5 reps of 12 on each muscle instead of 3 reps, as I just can not lift the next weight up AT ALL - it won't move - on my upper body. On my legs I have to be careful as I have arthritis although have come a long way since weight training and feel so much stronger. I'm not lifting light weights, and that 12/13th rep burns like mad, but don't want to do more damage. I'm 37, by the way, 5,5 and 130 pounds.

Anyway I know the extra reps mean more time, which I don't always have. What's more, I find I get the bonk if I do too much in one go. Yes I'm trying to lose weight too.

Question; What's wrong with splitting? I'm not thinking of working out less in a week, but just doing 3 weight training sessons instead of 1 every 4 or 5 days. Also I want to do more HIIT as I want to lose some fat.

Original Post by whitemargin:

I want to split it up because I'd like to do perhaps 4 or 5 reps of 12 on each muscle instead of 3 reps, as I just can not lift the next weight up AT ALL - it won't move - on my upper body. On my legs I have to be careful as I have arthritis although have come a long way since weight training and feel so much stronger. I'm not lifting light weights, and that 12/13th rep burns like mad, but don't want to do more damage. I'm 37, by the way, 5,5 and 130 pounds.

Anyway I know the extra reps mean more time, which I don't always have. What's more, I find I get the bonk if I do too much in one go. Yes I'm trying to lose weight too.

Question; What's wrong with splitting? I'm not thinking of working out less in a week, but just doing 3 weight training sessons instead of 1 every 4 or 5 days. Also I want to do more HIIT as I want to lose some fat.

Ok, none of that makes much sense.

Starting from the bottom.  

Unless you are an intermediate or better athlete (which judging from your posts seems unlikely), eating less than you expend is your quickest way to fat loss (not the mythical HIIT).

Doing resistance training (ie. lifting weights) while in a caloric deficit will retain more LBM than if you were in a caloric deficit alone.  As a newbie you may also add some LBM  in the early stages of your programming.

If you can't lift a weight for three reps... how could you get to 12.  You need to get past three to get to 12.  You sound desperately in need of a proper program written by someone who knows what they are doing... there is a list of the in the FAQs - they will all work.

 

I think you should pick a program and try following a program. It makes no sense to me that since you can not do 3 you want to do 12.

So following a pro written program is probably a great idea.  I like NRLfW. But basically you are best off when you do moves that use as many muscles as possible. The NRLfW workouts are designed for 3 workouts a week and you are alternating A and B workouts so you do different moves and engage your muscles differently on A days and B days.

 

OK I meant 3 lots of 12, not 3 lots of 3. My mistake.

Are you doing 12 sets? A beginner program like Starting Strength can be done in about 45 minutes.

 

I'm doing doing 3 lots of 8 - 12.

#12  
Quote  |  Reply
I think she means 12 reps, 3 sets. But not knowing that kind of lingo definitely means she's a newbie and should be following a structured program.

Just to make sure we are all on the same page:

Rep = 1 movement (i.e. 1 squat, 1 deadlift, 1 pushup)

Set = Several reps, done without rest.  At the end of a set, you would normally rest, tho some programs might have you move directly to a different exercise (supersetting).

So 3x12 means 3 sets of 12 reps.  So you'd do the exercise 12 times, then rest, then 12 more, then rest, then 12 more.

13 Replies
Advertisement
Advertisement
Allergy Remedies
Is It Possible to Go Natural?
The side effects of allergy medications keep some people from using them. Natural remedies can be a great alternative, but some are more effective than others.