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Nauseous after exercising


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Last night I got nauseous right after dinner after an intense workout. It is the 2nd or 3rd time it's happened after working out. Does this happen to other people and why does it happen?
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Could you describe your workout a bit?  Are you doing any type of cool down activity?  If so, how long is it and what is the activity in comparison to the rest of the workout?
I don't do any cool down, I know I should. I stretch for about 1 minute before and after (on a time schedule here) but I don't do cool down. I do walk home (about 10 minutes) so I figure that's my cool down. I do the elliptical for 65 minutes pushing myself all the way. I just don't have a lot of time to spend at the gym and want to burn as many calories as possible. If I stretch more or "cool down" will that help with the nausea?
I'd try it to see if it helps, at least.  I'll agree that your 10 minute walk would be a perfect cool down, but it depends on how much time lapses between your heavy bout with the elliptical and your walk.  In other words, do you spend 5-10 minutes in the locker room before you walk out the door, or do you hop off the elliptical and immediately walk out the door?

It could be something else entirely, but nausea. lightheadedness, and other adverse effects can be caused by going from heavy work to no work with no gradual decline inbetween.  It's worth trying out to see if it helps, then if it doesn't you'll know that it's something else.  :)
I tend to spend maybe 5-10 minutes in the locker room between that and going outside. so there is a small decline but maybe I should try cooling down when I feel very tired.

Thanks!
You say "right after dinner." Did you do your intense workout shortly after eating dinner? That could easily cause nausea. Best to wait at least an hour to digest.
Are you on blood pressure medicine?  If so, did you consult your physician before starting an exercise regimen?

The reason I ask is that some BP meds force your heart rate down, and really intense exercise can be dangerous and counterproductive.  Are you aiming for 60-70% of your maximum heart rate target for your age?  If you are going higher than about 70% that could be the problem. 

You might try interval training - sprint speed alternating with slower speeds - to avoid that, or just make sure your heart rate doesn't go higher than 70%. 

In any case, it would be wise to consult your gym's trainer or your doctor, not just us.  Good luck!  (And congrats on the excellent habit of exercising and then walking home!)
#7  
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You actually don't need to do 65 mins on the elliptical - exercise smart rather than hard.  The best 'routine' you can do is to choose a challenging workout, like 'random' and all you need to do is 20 mins.  The trick is to start out at level 4 (or 5) and increase the level every 2 mins until you hit the 10 min mark (Level 9 or 10), then decrease the level every 2 mins until the 20 mins is up.  You will be surprised at the workout you get!

I usually then walk on the treadmill for 1 mile or two, doing a 22min mile to cool down properly and then go home and have a light meal.  This routine stopped my nausea after a meal following exercise!
Thank you all so much for your helpful advice! I am not on BP medication and my doctor told me to start exercising. I will try the shorter workout (20 minutes) and as long as I burn the same amount of calories (around 850 in 65 minutes) then I just might adopt that!
I use to get really nausous during some work out routines.. but then I increased my water intake and increased my breathing during those excersises, i felt much better.. mainly it was the breathing.. controlled breathing, IN...OUt...IN...OUt nice and controlled...
#10  
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sometimes if you have caffiene prior to or right after working out, this can cause nausea. You should wait at least 30mins prior to eating anything. or,.... you may be trying to push your workouts too hard too soon, before you body is actually ready to adapt to it! 
You may be working out impropperly too.  Without knowing more about you, your level of fitness, your actual fitness goals, possible medications and many other factors it is had to say.  

I would suggest not eating quite as much prior to working out as a possible starting point.   Also look at using "heart-rate zone training" as an option.     Going slow for long periods of time will actually burn more fat.  Your body metabolizes fat more slowly than other fuel sorces.   If you are going fast enough to be creating Lactic Acid it will consume that as fuel more readily than fat.  

A good personal trainer can be very useful  ... especially when beginning a training regimn.  Frequently beginners make serrious mistakes and end up with avoidable injuries becaue of it. 
I did have a diet coke with dinner. Also, the water bottle I fill up (20 oz) is gone when I still have about 20 minutes left. Maybe I should get a bigger bottle. (We're gonna need a bigger boat.) :-)

I think I'm reading too much into this. Thanks for all of your help! I will try some of the things I've learned here and get a bigger bottle. :-)
make sure you have plenty of water, bring 2 bottles if you need, the worst thing is stopping a work out to get your bottle refilled.. throws it all off..
#14  
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what did you have for dinner? and how long after you ate did you work out?

after a meal, should wait for about 2 hours before a hard workout.
I never eat before I work but I do experence nausea doing my pilates class and that's the only time (go figure) but my pilates instructor told me it's normal to feel nausea and she told me that deep breathing helps and it does.

Like you my time is limited so I push myself really hard (hence I'm not exercising now because of a pulled muscle in my back) but I always cool down. Try Yoga it really helps with your breath and that should tackle the nausea. I don't know what you eat for dinner but it could be that your dinner is too heavy.
Try not to focus as much on calories burned...what you want is to ramp up your metabolism and get your heart working at target heart rate. Calories burned is a pleasant sideshow to the main event...cardio fitness.

Trouble is...there are calories and then there are calories. You should be much more concerned about what's making up those calories...how much fat? how many carbs? what's the nutritional payoff? Eating 800 calories of Snicker's Bars is in no way comparable to eating 800 calories of lean beef or chicken and vegetables with a sweet potato.

Learn to focus on quality, not quantity, and you cannot go wrong.
#17  
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That happened to me the first day i signed up for the gym. It was after i exercised on the elliptical intensely..I got off and felt like throwing up but couldnt and my whole body went clammy. I sat inside my gym's bathroom for about thirty minutes and couldnt move from the locker room for another thirty minutes. I think its just because your body couldnt handle the intensity of the exercise. Its telling you to take it down a notch.
Water intake can mess this up.  Yes you want plenty of water, but if you chug it at the wrong time, cant that cause stomach upset?  ie: too much of a good thing?  Maybe you want to pre-drink the water more before hand and not be consuming it rapidly during?  Just a guess, we all work differently internally ~ Lost Artist
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I agree with lost artist here.  If the water is too cold it can cause cramping for me and makes it hard to work out.  I try to drink 16 oz a 1/2 hour before working out then just take small drinks during the workout then drink another 16 oz at least afterwards.
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