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How often do you go to the gym?


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How many times a week do you go to the gym?

How often do you do cardio?

I'm trying to figure out how often a week I would need to go to the gym to stay fit and toned, and how often I should do cardio like running (I would do it everyday, but I don't want my knees to be shot in 10-20 yrs).

 

Thanks!

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I go to the gym 7 days a week and do cardio every single one of those days for 90 to 120 minutes at a time... Yes I know that's a long time... and I am sure for your first post on this forum that's not what you want to hear...

So what I recommend for you since it sounds like you're just starting out is to shoot for cardio every day for about 45 minutes. You could do 6 days a week but the 7th day you should try and do something active...The elliptical trainer is a great piece of equipment that is very easy on knees - it glides right under you - no hard impact.

As for weight training: try to get it in 2 to 3 times a week for a minimum of 20 minutes and a max of 60 minutes. Building muscle is a great way to rev your metabolism, keeping you fit and agile... Plus everyone needs this type of weight baring exercise to prevent/ward off osteoperosis!

 

 

Actually that's exactly what I wanted to hear, I really want to make it a goal to hit the gym everyday, and it's motivating to see other people doing it :) Do you use the treadmill as the majority of your cardio?

Thanks for the recommendations!

I go to the gym about 6 days per week and do 45 minutes of cardio per day. :) 

I go to the gym 5-6 days a week.

I do cardio every time I go to the gym as well. I only do 20-25 minutes of the elliptical (sometimes I just do 10 minutes if I'm feeling lazy) and I'll jog for 10 minutes.

I also weight train every time I go to the gym, but I split it up so I don't work out the same parts of my body every day. On the first day I'll do upper body work outs 50-75 reps usually, on the second day I'll do lower body work outs. It leaves me feeling less sore than I would if I were to work out the same parts of my body every day.

I'm not saying this to keep you from the gym, but the New York Times Health section just had a piece about research on running not being bad for the knees unless there was a previous injury. I was surprised!

I workout 5 days a week. Three days of intense exercise and two days of walking to aid with recovery. I take Sat and Sun off with no exercise at all.

My schedule :

Mon/Wed/Fri in the AM I do compound lifts for 45 minutes. Monday (Squat 5x5, Power Clean 5x3, and Barbel Row 5x5), Wednesday (Bench Press 5x5, Incline Bench Press 2x5, Close Grip Bench Press 2x5, and Weighted Dips 3x5). and Friday (Press 5x5, Deadlift 5x5, Squat 3x15, and Weighted Pull-Ups 3x5)

** On Fridays I do the three sets of high reps with squats because high rep squats are good for building mass/strength in the legs.

Mon/Wed/Fri in the PM I do my HIIT sessions. I like to do my HIIT the same day as my lifting sessions because it allows me to have a recovery day in between sessions. If I am repeatedly lifting one day and sprinting the next, I never really get a chance to recover.  By doing my HIIT at night, it allows me to have enough time after my lifting session to have the energy I need to do HIIT. Lately for HIIT, I have been sprinting for 10 seconds and walking for 20 repeatedly switching back and forth for 10 minutes. This allows me to get 20 sprints in during the 10 minutes. Definitely an intense workout. After I finish my last sprint, I walk around the neighborhood for an extra 15 minutes to cool down and get in a little bit of steady state cardio.

Tues/Thurs - I take 30 minute walks to aid with recovery and get in a bit of extra cardio.

Morning PT for military MWF, usually consists of calisthenics and a 5k. Then M-thur evenings a 50min spin class followed by a CrossFit WOD. The weekends are my lazy rest days, unless I play sandlot sports.

Your knees will not be shot in 10-20 yrs or even 50 years, if you run correctly. Landing under your center of gravity, lifting your feet, not pushing off. Example POSE method or Chi running.

To all posters who go to the gym 5-7 days a week and do at least 1 hour of cardio: how many calories are you eating everyday and how long did it take you to lose the weight you wanted?

I'm trying to get myself into the working out 6-7 days a week thing again since this is what helped me lose weight the first time around. I just walked on a treadmill for 60 minutes and lifted weights 10-15min afterwards. Though these days it will be much harder since I work. i do 4 10 hour shifts and don't leave until after 6 every night.

Original Post by iine:

I'm not saying this to keep you from the gym, but the New York Times Health section just had a piece about research on running not being bad for the knees unless there was a previous injury. I was surprised!

Surprised I hope that's true! I've never had any knee injury :)

Original Post by bmx419:

Morning PT for military MWF, usually consists of calisthenics and a 5k. Then M-thur evenings a 50min spin class followed by a CrossFit WOD. The weekends are my lazy rest days, unless I play sandlot sports.

Your knees will not be shot in 10-20 yrs or even 50 years, if you run correctly. Landing under your center of gravity, lifting your feet, not pushing off. Example POSE method or Chi running.

I'll definitely work on that, I really would like to run as much as I can, since it's an amazing cardio workout.

RECOVERY.

RECOVERY.

RECOVERY.

Working out 7 days a week does not give your muscles adequate time to repair damage. Exercise damages muscles, recovery is what repairs them and improves your fitness.

Aim for 6 days at the most.

http://www.stumptuous.com/sit-yo-ass-down-the -importance-of-rest

For those of you posting about running and knees, here's a link to a running study from Stanford: http://med.stanford.edu/news_releases/2008/au gust/running.html

I believe another study recently came out with the same findings.  Running doesn't increase injury, it delays the onset of injury and death when compared with non-running counterparts.

3 intense 45min sessions per week for me.  It's all about the quality not the quantity. 

I only do strength training, I don't actually do any cardio at the mo.

Two days a week, one hour of cardio a day. Going to replace one day with 30 minutes cardio, thirty minutes weights.

If you are worried about your knees, swimming or cycling will put less strain on those joints.

I go to the gym around twice a week for strength training. The only indoor cardio I do is some form of aerobics (step, dance or tae bo), also around twice a week.

But there`s a catch. I use my bike to get me anywhere and everywhere. So that`s around 30-60 mins of cardio each day, every day. I listen to my body and give myself days off when I need them. I usually just do some light walking on those days.

i workout 6 days a week. i alternate cardio and lifting days. cardio i do about an (intense) hour of step or kickboxing and sometimes boot camp style circuits if im feeling lazy. lifting i do full body for about 1.5 hours. if i do a upper or lower split i will only lift for 45 minutes to an hour.

3 times a week,  MWF,  30 min. cardio on treadmill, weights and some machines.  Unfortunately, I have not noticed any difference in my weight or measurements in many months.  Need to change something.

Original Post by quasicamel:

For those of you posting about running and knees, here's a link to a running study from Stanford: http://med.stanford.edu/news_releases/2008/au gust/running.html

I believe another study recently came out with the same findings.  Running doesn't increase injury, it delays the onset of injury and death when compared with non-running counterparts.

Yeah, in elderly runners who've built up to it over a long time - but on average 65% of runners are injured from the sport each year. Mostly overuse injuries from doing too much, increasing distance too fast and not doing enough resistance training to strengthen underused muscles and correct strength imbalances.

 The runners in the study started at age 50, which means the ones who were going to be disabled from running injuries and stop exercising already were out of the group selection. It's no surprise that life-long runners who have escaped injury and train with a recreational intensity and volume they've built up to over years aren't injury-prone. However, you can't extend that to the general population of recreational runners.

 Don't get me wrong here either though. Running is a completely safe and healthy activity provided you follow a sane training plan which incorporates a reasonable sports-specific strength training program that complements your chosen sport, and take developing injuries seriously before they become stress fractures.

 Something like the Army's fit to Run program or the no business running (without this)workout will work nicely as complementary injury prevention training, and coupled with a sane running program - Couch25K, Learn to Run, any of Hal highdons' plans, Chi running, the runners' world Smartcoach, any of those will work to keep you on track without time off for injury.

 This assumes normal weight and base fitness though. running while more than 50-75lbs overweight has unacceptably high injury rates and chances of developing chronic injuries. In which case the solution isn't to stop running permanently, it's to put the running on hold until you've done some sports-specific strength training and lost some weight so you aren't in the category of people with elevated injury risk.

I currently go to the gym 5-6 days a week, and each of those days I do some sort of cardio. Three days a week I do HIIT cardio and strength training, and the other days I may do the StairMaster or some steady state cardio on the treadmill. I try to mix it up, as doing the same thing over and over can get pretty dull.

I work out 4 days a week, three of them at the gym.

Mon -- short run (25 min) and strength training

Wed -- longer training run (over 1 hr)

Thurs -- short run (25 min) and strength training

Sat -- long run outdoors

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