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Is it possible to gain weight from over-exercising?


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I'm beginning to think this might be what is happening to me and why I recently gained. Is it possible? I'm beginning to think it is.

Stats: 5,4', now 111-ish pounds, 16 yrs old

Lift heavy 2x a week, bootcamp class 1x per week, XC practice 2x a week (about 7-9 miles, varying workouts such as fart lek and tempo runs), 1 long run (about 8 miles), and 2 short runs/ week (appx 4 miles). the past two weeks, i've only given myself 1 off day per week, but I am going to start taking 2, because I am feeling very worn out lately.
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Water weight due to damage to your cells.

Not real weight.

Even if the gain hasn't budged for over a week? Early last week, it sky-rocketed to 116. Now, it finally went back down to 112 this morning. 

I don't mean to argue, but I know of people who did large amounts of exercise, ate enough to compensate for it (like, maintenance), but ended up gaining 20+ pounds, even when they decreased the amount they were eating, but didn't decrease the exercise. 

I just really don't want this gain to turn into a 10+ pound gain. Even if it is all muscle, I don't want to gain anymore, especially since putting on muscle isn't my goal. 

Original Post by mochacafe9874:

I don't mean to argue, but I know of people who did large amounts of exercise, ate enough to compensate for it (like, maintenance), but ended up gaining 20+ pounds, even when they decreased the amount they were eating, but didn't decrease the exercise. 

 

Those people weren't actually at a deficit.

 

You can't argue science.

A 20 lb gain would mean someone has to eat a surplus of approximately 70,000 calories. Let's assume the average active teen consumed 3,000 calories a day. It would take over two months of eating 1,000 calories over maintenance to put on that much weight. Or over 4 months of eating 500 over maintenance.

You get the idea.

If someone steadily gains weight it is because they are eating more than they burn.

Water weight reaches a maximum usually.

My "real" weight is somewhere in the 195 lb area, but depending on my work outs and my hydration level it varies anywhere from 193 to 201 lbs.

Alright, that makes sense :) Some of these people did decrease their caloric intake without the exercise though (like, down to 2000), and still gained. I don't know how, it all worked, or if I missed something... 

But, one more thing: I was hungry for every freakin' calorie, and I still gained. I don't mind eating less, but I don't want to be hungry while doing so. Is that something a good meal plan could fix maybe? Or would cutting back on exercise maybe help decrease my appetite? I'm just really kind of at a loss with all of this.

Also, is it still possible that maybe the extra weight is water weight? I know it probably isn't, but if it's possible, that'd be nice... although I i doubt it is lol.

Fibrous foods keep you fuller for longer.

Protein also keeps you fuller, generally.

 

As for your extra weight, whether it's water or not, with all due respect, you could probably do with a bit of a gain. 111 lbs at 5'2 sounds a tad low to me.

thank you for your advice!I appreciate it... and 5,4" lol :)

I don't think you realize something.

Weight gain is inevitable.

Not only that, it's healthy.

Why?

Because, as a teenager, you are still growing.

You may still be getting taller.  I know girls who have come back from even college an inch or more taller.  But if you're not growing vertically, you are still developing.  Your hips are becoming wider, your boobs are getting bigger, your bones are still growing (and getting heavier), etc, I'm sure you don't need the whole puberty explanation.

Anyway, this continues into your early twenties.  Why do you think young people are known for having faster metabolisms?  The point is, you should expect to gain weight, and it would be imprudent and unhealthy to try to maintain your weight at fifteen for your entire life, especially when it's on the low end for your height.

I'm not saying that it's a good idea to binge, or that being a teen is an all-you-can-eat pass.  Just remember, the scale will eventually creep upwards, and it is a normal and healthy thing.

Not to mention, of course, you're doing crazy amounts of exercise and probably putting on a good amount of muscle.

Anyway, have you given any thought to chucking the scale, or at least just weighing once every week or two?  The numbers seem to be making you unduly anxious.

I didn't realize that gain was invevitable... not gonna lie, it's kind of scary o.o 

However, it makes me feel better knowing i'm supposed to gain a little. How much though? Like, 2 pounds? 5 pounds? 

My mom's getting rid of the scale for me, as she's getting annoyed at me for using it so much.

The fact that you are so preoccupied with your weight is a bad sign.

You're clearly healthy and at a good weight.

Your time could be better spent studying or doing something productive for humanity rather than worrying about something a silly as your weight.

Original Post by mochacafe9874:

I didn't realize that gain was invevitable... not gonna lie, it's kind of scary o.o 

However, it makes me feel better knowing i'm supposed to gain a little. How much though? Like, 2 pounds? 5 pounds? 

My mom's getting rid of the scale for me, as she's getting annoyed at me for using it so much.

Honestly, there's no real way to predict it.  That's the scary part, right?  That you really don't have total control.

For most teenagers, they don't eat a "set" amount a day, so when they get extra hungry for some reason, they don't overthink it and just eat...and then have a growth spurt.

It's a bit more confusing when someone counts their calories.  While you don't want to gain "unnecessary" weight, at the same time by trying to maintain your weight you could be preventing yourself from developing and growing.  There is a reason that in the US you have to be 21 before you drink: because your brain isn't fully developed until then (and in some cases, it isn't even finished then, but I digress).

Anyway, I would estimate (for what it's worth), that you could probably expect to end up around 120lbs, which is on the lower end of the healthy weight range for a 5'4 female.  I think it's a good step for you to get rid of your scale, as the number really isn't horribly important, and doesn't always correlate to looks.

For example, this woman:

http://gokaleo.com/

is in fantastic shape.  She's seriously lean and athletic, and at 5'9 and around 160lbs, her bmi is almost 24...at the high end of the range.  Yet she looks better than a good proportion of women, even if they weight 20lbs or less.

It's tough to think that there isn't always one right answer, or one perfect weight, or a certain bmi that will make everything better.  I would simply try to achieve healthy (which probably isn't very useful, but it's different for everyone).  Also, like Armandounc suggested (albeit in a slightly patronizing manner), try to focus on other things besides your weight.  It's great to have fitness goals, but when you spend hours a day planning meals, exercising, and simply dwelling on how your body could or should be, it's really no longer healthy.  A night with friends is a great way to realize that whether you're 110lbs or 112lbs or even 120lbs, it's okay.

Yes, it sounds like overtraining. Running 5 days/week is a pretty significant training stress; weight training provides additional stress which is counterproductive to running, and metcon isn't doing anything but tearing you up. That worn-out feeling and increased hunger are early indicators that you need to change things soon.

Make your focus XC and keep the running. Drop weights to once a week, and get rid of the boot camp. You can elevate your heart rate sufficiently through fartlek and track workouts. You don't have to take two days off entirely, but you need to start giving yourself more light days.

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