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A question about spinning and muscle mass


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My gym offers good spinning classes. I try to go once a day. Sometimes, I run twice a week or go to other cardio classes. I don't want to lose muscles. is 5-6 spinning classes a week too much? I try to work hard during my weight training sessions and don't want to lose my muscles because of too much cardio.

Another question. If you want to do spinning and weight same day, which one would you do first?

 

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bump.

Well, as a cyclist I ride as much as 12 to 14 hours a week on average during the season and losing muscle has never ever been an issue for me, I assume because I am not starving myself even when I'm cutting weight in the spring  I only lift weights in the off season.  As far as which to do first, it is a matter of personal priority.  If you do spinning first, your lifting will be compromised.  If you lift first, your spinning will be compromised.  That is assuming that you don't allow time for adequate recovering in between the sessions.

wow. 12-14 hours a week:) actually, for me, it is about 4.5 hours a week. I also want to add some running and I do weight lifting three times a week.

I maintain a calorie deficit. it is about 400 cals. my main goal now is fat loss.

I know it is hard to do both together. It sounds like I will have to go to the gym twice to do both.

 

If you are going to do two session, such as spinning and weight lifting, back to back, the one you do second will suffer.  If you are looking for fat loss, I would recommend lifting before your spinning class so you can get the most out of your weight session.  For fat loss there is no such thing as too much cardio, this applies to folks that are trying to build new muscle or otherwise gain weight.

 

 Yep, what he said. For fat loss you lift first to get a good intense and injury-free strength session in to preserve the muscle mass you have, and then you do as much cardio as you have the time and inclination to do.

 Once you include a good lifting program in your schedule - like the one you're doing - muscle is actually surprisingly tenacious and you have to go to spectacularly insane lengths with the cardio to lose muscle mass as a function of it.

 It's possible to overdo training volume for your level of conditioning - Tom has a much greater conditioning base to work with than you from years of being a rider, and training volume that's "barely adequate for maintenance" for him is "way too much" for - well, most people who aren't him. This is where managing training volume/intensity/duration comes into play, the more intense your workout the less of it you can do; conversely, you can walk practically forever with no side effects.

 Huh. This is the second time today I've agreed with Tom. Something's wrong :-P

Original Post by trhawley:

If you are going to do two session, such as spinning and weight lifting, back to back, the one you do second will suffer.  If you are looking for fat loss, I would recommend lifting before your spinning class so you can get the most out of your weight session.  For fat loss there is no such thing as too much cardio, this applies to folks that are trying to build new muscle or otherwise gain weight.

 

 The problem is after my weight lifting session, I don't have energy to do anything else. I am surprised that some people can do cardio after they lift weight.

I agree that for fat loss there is no such thing as too much cardio but I do think that " too much cardio" can cause muscle loss. right?

 

 

Melkor, thanks for considering my lifting program a good one. Actually, I was looking for some tips on how to take it to the next level. It is 6 exercises only and takes 40 minutes but I lift heavy and I try to correct my forms.

I was careful to not overtrain. I started slowly and it has been like a month a half. So now, I want to take my cardio program to the next level too.

Like you said. It is a question of managing volume/intensity/ duration.

the majority of the spinning classes are in the mornings. I am just a bit confused. How can I do this? spinning in the morning then lifting in the afternoon? or should I wake up very early to do the lifting then go to the class?

 

In my opinion, if you don't have the energy to spin after lifting then you are lifting right.  I also think that if you spin in the morning you should have recovered enough to get the most out of your lifting in the afternoon.  Try it and you you see that your lifting is suffering, such as not being able to do as many reps, then try to switch it up so you are not spinning the same mornings that you will be lifting if possible.

i spin three times a week and always do the weight circuit after. it's working great for me.

Original Post by trhawley:

In my opinion, if you don't have the energy to spin after lifting then you are lifting right.  I also think that if you spin in the morning you should have recovered enough to get the most out of your lifting in the afternoon.  Try it and you you see that your lifting is suffering, such as not being able to do as many reps, then try to switch it up so you are not spinning the same mornings that you will be lifting if possible.

 so what would be better for me to do in the mornings? weight or spinning? I can only do one at a time. Maybe spinning then after work, I will go for some lifting.

Yep, that's probably best - when doing two-a-days you'd do the cardio in the morning, then lifting in the evening.

 You'd actually want to do the lifting a little later in the day anyway; your spine isn't neccesarily ready for heavy loading early in the morning. The discs between the bone segments tend to fill with fluid when you lay down, and this places you at slightly higher risk of unfortunate events taking place.

#12  
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Does stops growing ur mucles even if ur doing alternate day weight training ?

I've never had any problems with form or, from what I can tell, even that much of a decrease in weights when I have lifted after doing up to 75 min of fairly intense cardio. In fact, in 25 years of working with people on exercise routines, I have never seen anyone become injured when lifting after doing cardio first--no matter how much cardio they did. 

The main difference is that I run out of interest so I don't do as many total exercises. But I always start with the main ones anyhow--squats, deadlifts, bench, pulldown, rows--and do 3-4 sets each. It's the other stuff I might slack off on. 

But a lot of the time I don't do a lot of peripheral stuff anyhow--I just don't have the time even if I don't do cardio first. 

I'm sure I could do better, but at age 57 I can bench more than my body weight and I've just about maxed out the leg press weight stacks (non-exercise related injuries have caused major problems with my squats). My lean body mass is 10lbs greater than it was when I was 31. So, I tend to see the more dramatic admonitions about cardio (OMG, must do weights first or you will collapse, or cardio will cause muscle to evaporate) as just a tad alarmist. 

I am also back to my frequent position which is that, compared to the large gains that beginners are going to make by just paying close attention to the basics, these are really trivial issues. 

I asked that question two years ago. I am glad that i am still getting answers even though I stopped spinning long time ago. Smile

Well, this is a post from 2009 that got resurrected, I've developed my thinking a bit since then - and I was just browsing the Journal of Strength and Conditioning the other day when I came across this little gem in a random walk between papers:

J Strength Cond Res. 2009 May;23(3):979-87.

Comparison of two lower-body modes of endurance training on lower-body strength development while concurrently training.
Gergley JC.

 I'd have liked to have read the full paper, but from the abstract it seems the choice of cardio plays a significant role; cycling didn't have nearly the attenuating effect on strength that treadmill running did. From some of the other papers I looked at in this thread the attenuating effect is mostly localized to the actual muscles in question so endurance training centered on lower body doesn't have any meaningful impact on upper-body strength development one way or another, which means I'm stepping away from my previous position of "always-weights-first" and going with my new one of "It depends on what your goals are" ;)

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