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ripped with 6 pack at ideal weight possible?


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Hi,

i am currently on a weight loss cycle .  ive been reading a lot on the forums that doing resistance/weight training would help build muscles. but as i understand  by reading others posts it often leads to weight loss plateaus and water retention  lot of times.

so id like to know this. once i reach my goal weight i.e 134 lbs at 5,6 height.

can i  build muscle  and build a 6 pack without putting on a single pound?.

id like to maintain my ideal weight and just get a 6 pack. with a bit of muscle . to look decent.

i am afraid if i start doing resistance now  during my regular cardio i will start putting on muscle weight  when i have already tonns of fat to burn. so i figure best time would be to start weight training when i have lost weight and become like 56-58 kgs. so i can get a leverage of 2 kgs when trying to get muscle.

for those who have already lost a lot of weight. what are your thoughts? have you tried for a ripped look during your weight loss or after you reached your goal weight.?

19 Replies (last)
You are way too concerne about a number on a scale.

You can't gain muscle in a calorie deficit, except maybe some newbie gains. But I have no idea how you can say you want to be "ripped" but don't want to gain muscle.

I don't know where you're getting this poppycock about "drawbacks" about lifting heavy. I also don't see why you wouldn't want to hold onto your muscle more efficiently while you diet off fat, which is exactly what heavy lifting while dieting down does.

My recommendation? Start lifting weights now, with a solid beginner program. Lots of good resources out there.

yes im concerned about number on scale because it gives me measure of my effort / progress.

can you gain muscle while eating just your maintenance calories or maybe a 100 or two more provide we can work and loose those 100  extra calories.

im not  implying  lifting heavy is bad. i personally want to do heavy weights when i  get down to my ideal weight. basically cos i don't want to interrupt my daily progress of weight loss due to any muscle weight gains.

i want to gain muscle not body weight.

I'd be more concerned with body composition instead of the scale. Any muscle gain should be seen as a good thing. Like I said, assuming you are in a deficit (which is requires to lose weight anyways) you MAY have some newbie gains, but those would soon stop and you would still be losing fat, and thus weight. You won't gain any muscle past newbie gains. Instead, you would be helping preserve your muscle instead of lose it (which inevitably happens when you diet.

I also think most people are wildly wrong about what they think is their "ideal weight."
Original Post by adioso:

yes im concerned about number on scale because it gives me measure of my effort / progress.

can you gain muscle while eating just your maintenance calories or maybe a 100 or two more provide we can work and loose those 100  extra calories.

im not  implying  lifting heavy is bad. i personally want to do heavy weights when i  get down to my ideal weight. basically cos i don't want to interrupt my daily progress of weight loss due to any muscle weight gains.

i want to gain muscle not body weight.

Muscle weighs more than fat, but it's a good weight. The using of weight is overrated, in my opinion.  You should look at you BMI and body fat %.  You can calculate BMI here and I know that the Livestrong website has a body fat % calculator.

What I think you should do is do body weight workouts(e.g. push ups, sit ups, chin ups, body weight squats) in a circuit style.

With that said, the extra exercise needs to be fueled.  Try going at it with what you are eating now and after a period of time see how you feel, check your weight etc.  Then if you don't see the results that you want adjust accordingly.

If you are worried about the weight loss and losing fat then I vote you continue doing that, then when you get your body fat % down(<----- much better indicator for six pack) Then start doing exercises that will increase the muscle on your frame.

It also might be in your best interests to go to a registered dietitian, they will be better help and can push you toward the right amount of food to eat, based on the workout.  I just went to one and it changed my whole out look on my weight.and workout combo

 

Original Post by adioso:

can you gain muscle while eating just your maintenance calories or maybe a 100 or two more provide we can work and loose those 100  extra calories.

Are you saying eat 100 calories above maintenance and then work them off with cardio? If that is what you are saying, then no you won't build any muscle doing this. To gain muscle you need to eat at a surplus. Eating at a surplus also means you will gain a little fat at the same time.

Unless your body fat is under 15%, you are probably over-thinking this. Just lift weights and eat at a deficit, and you will lose weight and improve your body composition.

 

Original Post by solid555:

Original Post by adioso:

can you gain muscle while eating just your maintenance calories or maybe a 100 or two more provide we can work and loose those 100  extra calories.

Are you saying eat 100 calories above maintenance and then work them off with cardio? If that is what you are saying, then no you won't build any muscle doing this. To gain muscle you need to eat at a surplus. Eating at a surplus also means you will gain a little fat at the same time.

Unless your body fat is under 15%, you are probably over-thinking this. Just lift weights and eat at a deficit, and you will lose weight and improve your body composition.

 

Thanks i get it now. yes i am over thinking it at my present stage. but its only so i can set my goal weight properly. i am 5,6 height . from what ive seen in gyms and few ripped friends of mine they are about 5-7kgs over their ideal weight.

so basically i understand i would have to decrease my weight to 5k less than my ideal weight so i can start eating in surplus and building muscle :) so i can get a decent muscle at my ideal weight O_o

does that sound right? or am i just being stupid?

You should not try to get underweight before you start trying to put on muscle. Like I said before, it is a good idea to lift weights while you lose fat. So you should just start lifting now. Initially you will get a lot stronger even if you are eating at a deficit.

 

Original Post by adioso:

Thanks i get it now. yes i am over thinking it at my present stage. but its only so i can set my goal weight properly. i am 5,6 height . from what ive seen in gyms and few ripped friends of mine they are about 5-7kgs over their ideal weight.

so basically i understand i would have to decrease my weight to 5k less than my ideal weight so i can start eating in surplus and building muscle :) so i can get a decent muscle at my ideal weight O_o

does that sound right? or am i just being stupid?

I'm sorry but this is irking me. How are you supposed to determine "ideal weight?" Whos to say what someones "ideal weight" is?

Original Post by ajaro:

Original Post by adioso:

Thanks i get it now. yes i am over thinking it at my present stage. but its only so i can set my goal weight properly. i am 5,6 height . from what ive seen in gyms and few ripped friends of mine they are about 5-7kgs over their ideal weight.

so basically i understand i would have to decrease my weight to 5k less than my ideal weight so i can start eating in surplus and building muscle :) so i can get a decent muscle at my ideal weight O_o

does that sound right? or am i just being stupid?

I'm sorry but this is irking me. How are you supposed to determine "ideal weight?" Whos to say what someones "ideal weight" is?

Body Mass Index is usually a good indicator of this.

Original Post by robertwill1983:

Original Post by ajaro:

Original Post by adioso:

Thanks i get it now. yes i am over thinking it at my present stage. but its only so i can set my goal weight properly. i am 5,6 height . from what ive seen in gyms and few ripped friends of mine they are about 5-7kgs over their ideal weight.

so basically i understand i would have to decrease my weight to 5k less than my ideal weight so i can start eating in surplus and building muscle :) so i can get a decent muscle at my ideal weight O_o

does that sound right? or am i just being stupid?

I'm sorry but this is irking me. How are you supposed to determine "ideal weight?" Whos to say what someones "ideal weight" is?

Body Mass Index is usually a good indicator of this.

BMI is absolutely terrible for finding some "perfect weight" considering how broad of a range it runs and how unreliable it is. Its a terrible indicator, and I was under the impression that just how "un-perfect" it is was no secret.

The scale doesn't tell you the TYPE of weight that you are losing which is why it isn't an ideal way to track progress. Just because the scale goes down, doesn't mean that you are losing fat. What happens a lot of the time is people will cut their calories and start doing hours and hours of cardio every week with no strength training whatsoever and not enough protein in their diets. The problem with this is that since most people don't eat enough to begin with, the decrease in calories with all the calories burned creates a HUGE calorie deficit. This will make the scale go down, but it is due to a loss of muscle and not fat. That is why so many people who lose weight are still unhappy with how their body looks. I get asked this all the time " Why do I still have so much fat on my body when I lost so much weight?" You would be much better off getting your body fat % taken every few months from a reliable source like DEXA, hydrostatic, or calipers.

** I am not a huge fan of the BMI either. Imagine that you have a 6ft tall guy who is 230lbs with only 8% body fat. He is obviously in great physical shape, but he would be obese according to the BMI because he weighed over 190 lbs.

A few things :

-  Nutrition and eating habits are the most important when it comes to losing fat and achieving the six pack that you want. This means eating clean 98% of the time (a few cheat meals once a week is fine though). Try to get 40% of your calories from carbs (whole grains, fruits/veggies), 30% from protein, and 30% from fat (mono-unsaturated, poly-unsaturated, a bit of saturated, and no trans fats). There are 4 calories in one gram of protein and carbs, and 9 calories in one gram of fat. So take the percentage times your total amount of calories and divide by either 4 or 9. This will tell you how many grams of protein, carbs, and fat to get every day. Try to have protein, carbs, and fat in every meal that you eat.

- If you want to lose fat, you have to create a moderate calorie deficit. This means taking in less calories than it takes to maintain your weight. However, you have to make sure that you get an accurate number of what your maintenance number of calories is based on your age, weight, height, and how many times per week you work out. A lot of people don't eat enough as it is, so you may need to increase your calorie intake just to get to the right calorie deficit. A good calorie deficit to have is 500 under maintenance. This ensures a small steady fat loss of 1lb per week and keeps muscle loss to a minimum.

- Women can't bulk up or add "new muscle" because they don't have the testosterone needed for it. However, strength training allows you to increase your strength levels and improve on the muscle that you have already. That way when you lose body fat, it stands out. Women make the mistake of thinking that they have put on muscle, but all they have really done is improved on muscle they already had in the first place. So when you combine the fact that you don't have the necessary testosterone to bulk, along with the fact that you will be on a deficit, the only place the scale will go is down. You just need to make sure you are taking the necessary steps to insure it is fat you are losing and not muscle.

1) Get your nutrition, eating habits, and calorie count in order.

2) Start strength training 3x per week every other day (full body routines and compound exercises are highly recommended)

3) Mix up the type of cardio that you do. Work in HIIT a few times per week after strength training along with 2-3 regular cardio sessions spread through out the week.

4) Make sure you get necessary recovery needed as well. It is just as important as exercise. Take at least one day off per week (preferably two), and take a recovery week after every 2-3 months of training. A recovery week would be 3 days of light cardio spread through out the week and no intense training like weights or HIIT.

Original Post by ajaro:

Original Post by robertwill1983:

Original Post by ajaro:

Original Post by adioso:

Thanks i get it now. yes i am over thinking it at my present stage. but its only so i can set my goal weight properly. i am 5,6 height . from what ive seen in gyms and few ripped friends of mine they are about 5-7kgs over their ideal weight.

so basically i understand i would have to decrease my weight to 5k less than my ideal weight so i can start eating in surplus and building muscle :) so i can get a decent muscle at my ideal weight O_o

does that sound right? or am i just being stupid?

I'm sorry but this is irking me. How are you supposed to determine "ideal weight?" Whos to say what someones "ideal weight" is?

Body Mass Index is usually a good indicator of this.

BMI is absolutely terrible for finding some "perfect weight" considering how broad of a range it runs and how unreliable it is. Its a terrible indicator, and I was under the impression that just how "un-perfect" it is was no secret.

Never said perfect, but I see your point.  Guess I never really did enough research on it I just assumed, never do that again.

I guess ideal weight is more up to the person, right?

I really don't get whats wrong with the height/weight chart that are all over medical/science books and the net. haven't these charts been made after years of research ?

 

According to BMI, a healthy weight for my height could be anywhere between 115 and 154. Depending on how much muscle I have and my frame size, it is unlikely that I would be healthy throughout that entire 40-lb range, or that either extreme would look particularly good for me.  Hence the statements that BMI is pretty damn terrible for figuring out an "ideal" or "perfect" weight.

ETA: From wikipedia: BMI was explicitly cited by Keys as being appropriate for population studies, and inappropriate for individual diagnosis. Nevertheless, due to its simplicity, it came to be widely used for individual diagnosis, despite its inappropriateness.

I am in sync with all of the advice above, but I just wanted to say that I hear you regarding your "goal weight".  When you have worked really hard to achieve a goal, its hard to give that up.  Its also hard when a new workout routine messes with the hard-won weight loss. 

However, as you think about the kind of body that you want, consider changing your target, as described above.  There are plenty of people on this site that use diet alone to acheive their goal (weight loss) but your goal of getting "ripped" means that you will need to have less focus on the scale and more on the mirror and how your clothes fit.

Original Post by adioso:

I really don't get whats wrong with the height/weight chart that are all over medical/science books and the net. haven't these charts been made after years of research ?

 

The problem is that you are using people's height to determine a healthy body weight. But people have very different body types, bone densities, etc. Put a Maasai next to someone from Mongolia and you will see the problem.

I am 5'9" and 180 pounds, so my BMI is 26.6 and I am classified as overweight. But I can see my abs and I have less than 20% body fat.

 

ok soo if you are gaining muscle weight you wont increase in size?.

i guess after i get near my ideal weight my goal has to be fat loss. and staying slim and muscled without being concerned about weight o_O.

Ive read so many heart diseases /diabetes  are due to over weight problems. my family has a history of diabetes which is why am kinda anxious about weight .

but ultimately my goal should be fat loss O_o .

@_@

Original Post by adioso:

ok soo if you are gaining muscle weight you wont increase in size?.

i guess after i get near my ideal weight my goal has to be fat loss. and staying slim and muscled without being concerned about weight o_O.

Ive read so many heart diseases /diabetes  are due to over weight problems. my family has a history of diabetes which is why am kinda anxious about weight .

but ultimately my goal should be fat loss O_o .

@_@

Lean muscle weighs more but is smaller than fat.

 Lately it's been said that while BMI is a reasonable predictor of health in large-scale population studies, in person the waist/height ratio is possibly better

 Must say though, that people who have an overweight BMI but a safe waist/height ratio are statistically improbable; normally there's a great deal of correlation between the two.  

 Not always; I'd need to lose about 10-20 lbs of muscle mass to reach a normal BMI 'cause I've got what might be considered a statistically unlikely body. But aside from those of us who push iron for a hobby and thus fall outside of the populations the standard BMI calculation is valid for it's a reasonable shortcut to asses someone's likely cardio risk.

 And if your doctor can't tell the difference between twenty pounds of extra flab or muscle you should be nice to him, it's not an easy job for a blind person :-P

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