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running in place vs. running outside/on treadmill


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This might be a dumb question, but is running in place as effective for marathon training as actually running outside or on a treadmill? If not, would you recommend running for longer intervels when running in place to match the difficulty of running outside? I am trying to increase my endurance.

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As far as marathon training goes, running in place will never get you anywhere.

 

+1 on that.  Running outside would be my first choice.  Running on a treadmill would be a distant second.  Running in place wouldn't enter into the equation at all.  And my response wouldn't be different if you're talking about training for a 5k race or a marathon.

Although anyone who can run in place for 2+ hours (that's about the minimum time I'd think of for marathon training) has my respect for mental toughness.  Same with the treadmill...

Clint

Original Post by oldguysrule:

As far as marathon training goes, running in place will never get you anywhere.

 Laughing

and as usual, i'm going to ask the obvious: what's wrong with going outside?

I would think that running in place would be full of injuries.  If you run in place like I suspect most people do, you're putting a huge amount of stress on your knees and calf muscles since you don't have that natural heel to toe action.

running in place is pretty much only good for keeping your heart rate up between exercises during circu it training/weight lifting

training for a marathon by running in place is like practicing for basketball by throwing a tennis ball aimlessly at a hockey net... it's not gonna teach you anything about how your body responds pounding endless miles on hard ground

your best bet is outside, or on a treadmill with a 1% incline (stimulates the wind resistance and uneven ground of the road)

incorporate intervals during your run.. alternating between fast runs for a minute or two, then slowing down to a walk or jog for another 1-2 minutes... repeat. Interval training relieves boredom, can help break through plateaus, and help increase your endurance and speed.

The treadmill is a great machine for intervals since it allows you to change your speed and incline to make the workout as challenging as you want 

Original Post by cherry_lips:

I would think that running in place would be full of injuries.  If you run in place like I suspect most people do, you're putting a huge amount of stress on your knees and calf muscles since you don't have that natural heel to toe action.

 Wow.

Anyway. Can anyone actually give a reason why running in place isn't good? Minus silly analogies. I'm not supporting it, just curious if anyone actually has any real info on it.

i don't think it's "not good."  i just think it's a damned poor way to train for a marathon.

Original Post by bmx419:

Original Post by cherry_lips:

I would think that running in place would be full of injuries.  If you run in place like I suspect most people do, you're putting a huge amount of stress on your knees and calf muscles since you don't have that natural heel to toe action.

 Wow.

Anyway. Can anyone actually give a reason why running in place isn't good? Minus silly analogies. I'm not supporting it, just curious if anyone actually has any real info on it.

First of all, what I said was not an analogy.

Secondly, I looked for some real info on it.  There really isn't any.  I'm guessing it's because not too many people run in place for an extended period of time for cardio.  Then again, it's all a guess.  I'm not going to run in place for two hours to see if I injure myself.  You're welcome to try though.

Original Post by cherry_lips:

Original Post by bmx419:

Original Post by cherry_lips:

I would think that running in place would be full of injuries.  If you run in place like I suspect most people do, you're putting a huge amount of stress on your knees and calf muscles since you don't have that natural heel to toe action.

 Wow.

Anyway. Can anyone actually give a reason why running in place isn't good? Minus silly analogies. I'm not supporting it, just curious if anyone actually has any real info on it.

First of all, what I said was not an analogy.

Secondly, I looked for some real info on it.  There really isn't any.  I'm guessing it's because not too many people run in place for an extended period of time for cardio.  Then again, it's all a guess.  I'm not going to run in place for two hours to see if I injure myself.  You're welcome to try though.

 Sorry. Let me explain. The "wow" was only a response to your quoted comment. Heel to toe is not a "natural" action for running. If you read some studies you'll see that. Moving on...  The "Anyway" was to signify that the rest of my comment was directed to the post as a whole, not just your comment. Again, sorry for the confusion. But I'll address your response anyway.

Running in place is probably a lot easier on your knees. Possibly too easy to train for a marathon(conditioning muscles and all) and that's probably why people here aren't recommending it. If you look for some studies on running form you'll see why running in place(landing midfoot...I hope) is easier on the knees than heel striking.

Like I said, I looked for studies about running in place and didn't find any.  Please post the research.

This is the only training example I know of that made use of running in place:

To build heat tolerance for a race across the sahara desert, my brother ran in place, on a min-trampoline, in a sauna. He would go until he got dizzy, step outside to recover, and then go back in etc. He lives in Denver and so didn't have anywhere nearby hot enough to train.

The race (Marathon de Sables) is a six day stage race equivalent to running 5 1/2 marathons. 

http://www.saharamarathon.co.uk/gallery_6.htm l

 

Original Post by oldguysrule:

As far as marathon training goes, running in place will never get you anywhere.

 

hee hee.  OGR, you are some awesome.

Seriously considering running in place for marathon training -- all 17 weeks of it? And the 2, 3 and 4 hour runs?

Well, it is effective at ...  making me chuckle.  Was this a serious Q?

Original Post by bmx419

Can anyone actually give a reason why running in place isn't good?

 It isn't good for training for a running event because actual running requires you to propel yourself forward while running in place doesn't.  The two activities require different movements.

#16  
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I'm not an expert in any sense of the word but according to Livestrong.com running in place does have some benefit, though it seems more as a part of a whole training routine rather than a replacement. Here's what they said about running in place:

"Benefits of Running in Place

Running in place is a strenuous, plyometric action that builds lower-body strength and agility. Plyometrics, which Life Time Endurance states train a muscle to combine maximum speed and strength, involve springing actions such as jumps and hops, and running in place is basically a sequence of alternating one-legged jumps. Specifically, it requires balance, the control of impact forces through the forefoot, and superior ankle and calf strength. Spring Track's exercise physiologist Owen Anderson describes how strong, flexible ankles and calves ensure powerful toe-offs, smooth strides and soft landings that reduce the risk of bone and ligament injury. Flexible ankles also allow full engagement of the muscles in your lower legs and feet, creating strong, elastic strides and delaying fatigue.

Running in Place Technique

Begin leaping softly from foot to foot for five minutes, focusing on landing on the balls of your feet and kicking your heels toward the ceiling. Gradually increase your tempo and height, and try to hit your butt with your heels. This explosive, all-leg action generates quick muscle contraction and relaxation, training your neuromusculature for speed work and racing. Exercise Goals illustrates a variation: the high-knee drill. Instead of heel-kicking your glutes you're bringing your knees up high in front of you. This strengthens your hip and abdominal muscles."


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/279148-runn ing-in-place-vs-treadmill/#ixzz1uqPtYpfk

Prior to Missdae this post was nearly two years old.. The dead are beginning to walk amongst us :)

lol livestrong makes lots of ridiculous claims. running in place will get you nowhere. WHy one would choose running in place vs. real running, other than for obscure purposes like ORG's brother, is beyond me.

I've never really tried running in place, but when it comes to increasing your endurance to run, all you have to do is to ... run and be persistent with it. You will improve over time, the more you do it the longer you go the better you get at it. It isn't a one month project either, I've been doing it seriously for 2 1/2 years now and I'm still improving my times bit by bit.

As far as outside running vs treadmill running, surprisingly I find that both are equally effective. I train most of the winter indoors and I don't lose a step when it comes to translating that to and outdoor race in the springtime. As long as you are pushing yourself on the treadmill and getting the training in, it is just as effective as running outdoors.

#20  
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Yeah, sorry I didn't realize how old this post was. I just happened to be looking up information on this same topic and I thought what I found out might be relevant. For me personally my goal isn't to run marathons, I just want to get healthy so for my purposes I don't see anything wrong with running in place as part of a wider exercise program. Certain days I can't get out to run, but I still want that cardio (I do not have access to a treadmill either). For me running in place gives me something to do where I might normally just give up.

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