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Running Versus Walking on incline (4mph at 4-5% incline)


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Hi!

I have a hard time running (hurts my knees) however I'm wondering if walking at 4mph at 4%-5% incline on the treadmill (getting my heart rate into the fat burning zone) is equivalent?

 

Are the benefits the same?

 

Thanks!

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I'd say it's the same. That is what I do for cardio.

 

I have a ismiliar issue with my knees and I walk on the treadmill.  You can increase your calorie burn on the treadmill by doing the incline, that's what I do.  And since going uphill is easier on the knees than going downhill and the treadmill lets you go uphill without ever having to go downhill.  I work out at an incline of 6 to 8 %.

Also, you might want to consider an elliptical.  Since your feet are always on the treads, there is less stress on the knees.

Original Post by mizkay:

I have a ismiliar issue with my knees and I walk on the treadmill.  You can increase your calorie burn on the treadmill by doing the incline, that's what I do.  And since going uphill is easier on the knees than going downhill and the treadmill lets you go uphill without ever having to go downhill.  I work out at an incline of 6 to 8 %.

Also, you might want to consider an elliptical.  Since your feet are always on the treads, there is less stress on the knees.

I was just about to say...what about trying an elliptical? The impact is basically nothing, and you can increase the resistance to make a harder workout.

See if your knees can tolerate an even steeper incline. Walking at a slower speed (e.g 2.6-3.0 mph) and a steep incline (10.0-15.0%) can work you hard, burn a lot of calories, and it often more easily tolerated than walking at a faster speed and more moderate incline. 

Trying to walk at 4.0-4.5 mph and then do an incline requires that you keep your foot in a flexed position during much of the stride--that's because of the more rapid turnover required. Many people fatigue more easily and can even develop anterior tibial pain because of that. 

Or, even worse, you give in to the temptation of holding on to the handrails, which negates the effect of the increased speed and incline. 

It's just something to consider. Walking at 4.0 mph/5% is about 6.8 METs, not quite equivalent to running 5.0 mph. Walking at 2.6 mph/12% elevation is about 7.3 METs. 

go outside.

I used to run until I got shin splints. Now I walk on treadmill at about 3.3mph on a 15% incline -all the machine will go.  I am tired at end of 25 minutes. I don't know accuracy of machine as far as calories burned but the readout says 320.  I wish I knew for sure.

what is the equivalent of the METs to calories burned?

Yep, it's totally fine - and you can still use interval training to mix things up and ramp up your fast-twitch fibers and calorie burn. My current cardio routine is incline walking - I set the incline to 10%, walking at a 3.3 speed, and every other minute I bump it straight up to 15%. It gets my heart GOING! -- past the "fat burning zone," btw - to burn fat, you want to burn calories. Aim for your target heart rate, 85% of your maximum heart rate.

Original Post by ipoohbear:

what is the equivalent of the METs to calories burned?

Body wt (in kg) x METs = Calories/hour. Divide that number by 60 to get calories/min or by the fraction of an hour your workout lasted to get calories burned for the workout. 

80Kg person working at 7.3 METs = 584 calories/hr. 

hi. i find that walking uphill works wonders for the cellulite on my thighs. I enjoy running 3-5 miles a day, but switch it to walking @ an incline of 5 at 4.0mph 3 times per week. to me, i feel the impact is the same on my knees as running. maybe try cycling or the eliptical for less impact?

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