Fitness
Moderators: melkor


Shin Splints...Sedentary?


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Hi everyone. recently I've developed shin splints from overtraining in track. The coaches get very mad when you stop running for them but I know running on them can lead to stress fractures. I'm going to the doctor and to my school trainer (who isn't super helpful~everyday he just plans to check how I'm doing until my shins don't ache). Does anyone know how long shin splints usually last until you can run again? Advice for making the process quicker? I'm icing a lot and sort of resting (school + home, doing the bike during track).The case isn't too severe but it's pretty damn painful on 1 leg.

Also,  should I label myself as sedentary now, at least until I can run again? I was at moderate activity, since I was doing long-distance track, and I had people telling me to put it to light activity. should I label myself as sedentary for the next few days-weeks?

Thanks!

 

Edited Mar 13 2012 23:49 by melkor
Reason: Please don't post the same question to multiple forums.
12 Replies (last)
Shin splints usually lasts about 2 weeks. You can wrap your legs and keep them elevated when possible.

Thanks...that's what I've mostly heard. I'm really nervous though!! I can't do any exercise for 2 weeks!!! 

It sucks. I've been there, but it's better to rest now and address the problem when you recover than it is to try and run through it. If you rest now, you might heal faster than you expect, but if you run through it, at best, it will hurt like hell, and at worst, you will hurt yourself more and be out a lot longer than 2 weeks.
Original Post by smashley23:

It sucks. I've been there, but it's better to rest now and address the problem when you recover than it is to try and run through it. If you rest now, you might heal faster than you expect, but if you run through it, at best, it will hurt like hell, and at worst, you will hurt yourself more and be out a lot longer than 2 weeks.

That's really smart, sound advice. but it just sucks because once I get back to running it will just feel like so much to have to get back into 4 miles a day. Plus the coaches are pissed that I'm not just pushing through it and it makes me feel really bad. 

I don't have any advice for your coaches, but I would look up shin splint friendly exercises to do in addition to the biking, which is a good start. Your coaches will get over it. You weren't their first shin splint victim and you won't be their last.
#6  
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Hi

I've been injured several times - not with shin splints - but with serious knee injury (was in a leg brace for months grrrr), achilles injury (x2) torn calf muscle, and recently a broken ankle.  I've always found that doing anything so long as it doesn't hurt the injury is better than doing nothing - both physically & mentally. Like you I did the bike (not with the knee lol), also the recumbent bike, swimming, and what we call a cross-trainer - I think you guys call it eliptical? I also continued my weight training but had to modify it a bit to work around the injuries.  I found you can preserve some level of fitness and then don't have quite so much ground to make up when you come back.

 

All the best for your recovery

Copying over the response from your duplicate topic:

Original Post by cincy46runner:

I had shin splints a few years ago from running long distances, and the doctor I saw suggested a stretching exercise where I try to roll onto the top of my foot and getting a good stretch on my shin.  It looks and feels awkward to do, and it's kinda hard to explain, but hopefully you understand.  I worked on this stretching before and after every run until soon afterward the pain subsided.  It's been a few years since then, and I still occassionally do that stretch, but haven't had shin pain again. 

I put myself on sedatary activity level all the time, and then add in the calories I burn throughout the day, whether its running or weight lifting. 

 

Original Post by fitnfierce:

Original Post by smashley23:

It sucks. I've been there, but it's better to rest now and address the problem when you recover than it is to try and run through it. If you rest now, you might heal faster than you expect, but if you run through it, at best, it will hurt like hell, and at worst, you will hurt yourself more and be out a lot longer than 2 weeks.

That's really smart, sound advice. but it just sucks because once I get back to running it will just feel like so much to have to get back into 4 miles a day. Plus the coaches are pissed that I'm not just pushing through it and it makes me feel really bad. 

Your coaches are complete morons and should be removed from their job straightaway. You do not ever "train through an injury" unless you want to completely ruin your athlete for life and turn a temporary problem into a permanent crippling injury.

agreed with melkor; your coaches should NOT be making you run when you're suffering an injury. Shame on them too, for not starting you out right. With sports, it's not right to just throw someone to the wolves when they're just starting, cause they'll get injured -.- Anyway, just make sure to rest, and since you're sedentary, 1500 calories to meet your goal should be sufficient. When you're running again, 1800 :)

I dealt with shin splints off and on for over a year. What I learned firstly was, you need to rest until they're healed. No running period.

Stretching. Shins, calves and soleus(right under your calf). Google if needed.

Strengthen your shins. Walk slowly on your heels, so your toes/foot is flexed towards you. Using a resistance band wrap it around your foot and anchor the other side to something, so you can flex your foot towards you. Again, Google if needed.

Then, SLOWLY get back to running. I'm sure you can knock out 5+ miles no problem, but don't do that. Start with a 1/4 mile at a time. Slowly adding distance or time every other day, if not 1 on 2 off. All the while, continuing your stretches and lower leg exercises.

Don't worry about your coach.  Rest it until you feel it's better.

#12  
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I agree with bmx419 in that it is best to stretch your soleus and gastrocnemius muscles (look up on the Internet if you do not know how to do those stretches). You will also need to strengthen the muscles on the front of your lower legs by either walking in your heals or you may sit in a chair with your feet on the floor. Simply raise your toes off of the floor until you get fatigued. Take a break and do it for 2 more sets in the same fashion.

It may also be a great idea to do some cross-training so you can continue to work on your cardio strengthening without put undue stress through your lower legs such as biking or swimming.

Good luck on your training!
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