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Shouldn't exercise two days in a row????


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I had mentioned to my friend that I had planned on starting to go to the gym almost every day instead of just three times a week. He told me that people aren't supposed to work out two days in a row, they are supposed to skip a day inbetween every workout- Is that true?

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Not the same kind of workout targeting the same movement patterns and muscles two days in a row - there's no problem if you lift weights one day and do endurance training the next, or train upper body one day, lower body next.

Are you planning on doing weights? If so, ditto to what Melkor said. Cardio is completely acceptable to do two days [or, of course, more] in a row. Although I recommend chaning the cardio up/cross train for better results.

Concerning circuit training, one could work out every day a the gym if the goal was to burn calories and not necessarily gain muscle.  It also is effective to skip a day between doing the same circuit training routine, but for cardio and calorie burn working out at the gym every day or several days in a row on circuits works ok.

i go running, and if i run two consecutive days, the second day is never as productive and i feel more fatigued. i get the most positive results by skipping days. on the non running days, i do sit ups. this seems to work well along side.

 

what i'm trying to say (long windedly!) is that it entirely depends on the nature of your work out. As mentioned above.

 

Don't do the same thing (work the same muscles) two days in a row, but certainly don't limit yourself to only working out on alternate days! Like other posters have said, either do bodypart splits for resistance training or alternate cardio/weights or do different kinds of cardio.

I have a repetitive motion injury from riding my exercise bike for multiple days in a row, gotta be careful not only of straining your muscles but also of joint injuries.  You can work out as many days in a row as you like but definitely change up the exercises so you're not straining anything (like I did!)

In general, though, certain arm muscles are different than certain leg muscles.  Runners training for races or people who have run-workouts 5 or 6 days a week are exercising exactly the same muscles almost every day.  The same can be said for walking.  Before I broke my Airdyne, I was riding it once a day and sometimes twice a day.  I didn't feel that my leg muscles seemed negatively affected by that.  Some people argue that ab/crunchers should be done every other day; but some people suggest that ab muscles are more like leg muscles and a person can do the same ab exercises daily.  I know that research shows that if a person wants to rebuild muscle so that they become bigger, he/she needs to let them rebuild from being torn down.  But that does not apply to all muscles.  Also, think about mechanics, farmers, brick layers, sheet rock installers, etc.  They often have big biceps, triceps, forearms, etc. and they do the same repetitive exercises almost daily.

Exercise, to have a training effect, must pass the Minimum Essential Strain threshold for the parameter you're training. If it does pass this MES threshold then you shouldn't perform an exercise that passes the same threshold again if you're a beginner or intermediate trainee - advanced trainees can handle training loads, frequencies and intensities that would outright kill a beginner.

 You can potentially do energy systems work (long duration endurance training) more often and with greater volume than you can do strength training, provided you stay at recovery intensities or lower for much of it. If you are working at the lactate threshold all day every day you're going to hammer your body to pieces with repetitive strain injuries and overtrain  in short order.

 How muscles express in response to training and how much you can safely do before you overtrain is largely a function of training age and genetics - an Olympic weight lifter prepping for competition will certainly strength train with a very high frequency, but the casual gym-goer in his 30ies or 40ies looking to get into better shape can't use the training schedule of a 25-year old who've been training since he was 10 prepping for the Olympics. Not and expect to survive the experience intact, at any rate.

I don't get it. If your job it sendentary, I think everyone should have at least a light walk daily.

Footbal players excercise pretty much daily.  Why is it the average joe can't exercise daily without some sort of drawback.

Eat healthy, take a supplement, and at least walk daily.

But more me, I do elliptical one day, which I don't find hard, then jog/powerwalk the next day. I take a day off when I can't do either--I'd rather aim for every day and fall short 3 out of 7 times then plan certain days and then not be able to make it.

Original Post by mandypants007:

He told me that people aren't supposed to work out two days in a row, they are supposed to skip a day inbetween every workout- Is that true?

It depends on any number of factors including the type and intensity of the exericse, current condition, past training experience, recovery protocol, etc.

There is no rule about how often you can/can't workout, as long as the program fits your recovery.

 

Original Post by phoray:

I don't get it. If your job it sendentary, I think everyone should have at least a light walk daily.

Footbal players excercise pretty much daily.  Why is it the average joe can't exercise daily without some sort of drawback.

Eat healthy, take a supplement, and at least walk daily.

But more me, I do elliptical one day, which I don't find hard, then jog/powerwalk the next day. I take a day off when I can't do either--I'd rather aim for every day and fall short 3 out of 7 times then plan certain days and then not be able to make it.

A light walk is generally recovery intensity for anyone not suffering from muscular dystrophy or 90, and can be done daily - though there's certainly volume restrictions there too; I don't think I'd recommend doing much above 2 hours continuous walking daily without training for it for some time. Anything below that doesn't seem to impact much of anything wrt. recovery.

 Keep in mind that the intensity of walking is low enough that the cumulative effect of 6 5-minute blocks of walking has an equivalent impact on your system to one 30-minute block of continuous walking; this is the underlying logic behind the 10,000 steps campaign.

 Football players exercise almost daily and survive the experience because it's their job and they have no other demands on their time, so there's no additional stress to impair recovery - and they've build up to tolerate those training loads over 10-20 years.

 You can't compare someone with a training age of 10+ years of serious, sports-specific training with a recreational trainee with a training age of 2-3 months.

 I'd also like to note that most footballers who even make it to retire at 40 without suffering a career-ending injury on the field do so with their joints so beat up they're functionally crippled for the rest of their relatively short lives anyway, requiring assistance to get out of bed in the morning. Not at all a role model for health and longevity either on or off the field, and given the rampant and massive drug use among the pros of any sport I don't think you can even qualitatively classify their metabolism and recovery capacity as human.

Original Post by melkor:

 I'd also like to note that most footballers who even make it to retire at 40 without suffering a career-ending injury on the field do so with their joints so beat up they're functionally crippled for the rest of their relatively short lives anyway, requiring assistance to get out of bed in the morning. Not at all a role model for health and longevity either on or off the field, and given the rampant and massive drug use among the pros of any sport I don't think you can even qualitatively classify their metabolism and recovery capacity as human.

But.......their butts look hot in their tight pants! ;)

LOL to fitnessgirl

 

I was just trying to say a light walk daily won't harm anyone. Sorry my example wasn't perfect. I never implied that anyone should walk TREMENDOUS amounts (hence the word "light") nor exercise as much as a football playes is inclined to do.

Unless someone has reliable sources to prove otherwise, I will go one step (pun intended) further and suggest that even fast/speed walking daily will not hurt a person.  For example, I have been walking almost daily, either long distances or shorter "speed" walking, for a very long time--3 or so years.  The only negative things physically for me was getting blisters wearing new shoes because I am a moron for trying them out on a 2-hour walk, or hurting my hamstrings being dumb enough to wear heavy ankle weights, or walking in heavy snow for 2 hours and pulling a calf muscle; but as far as the daily walking goes, I maintain that it is perfectly healthy if one follows basic rules of having the right shoes and doesn't engage in silly things as I listed above. 

Also, before I broke my Airdyne (and, dang, I wish they would call so I could get it back), I was riding it almost daily.  Again, I feel it is perfectly fine to do that.

Yeah, that seems reasonable - again, I refer you to this handy chart of training intensities and note that below 50% of your current (VoMax) capacity is recovery intensity. That can be done daily - it's only the higher intensities that impact your recovery ability and needs to be managed more closely with respect to training volume.

 Also, after 3 years I'd expect you to have a very different dose/response curve from that of a beginner. Tolerance for training volume builds over time, while my illustration graph is certainly not to any scale it IS a reasonable representation of both how an advanced trainee can maintain a reasonable performance on low training doses and can tolerate training volumes that would outright kill a beginner.

 For a beginner, sticking to 7 hours or less of weekly high-intensity training time with as much recovery work as you have the time for is a good rule of thumb. The advanced athlete can frequently tolerate training dosages of 7-8 hours a day almost every day for shorter periods or slightly lower dosages for extended periods - though as noted, they pay the price in the form of wear and tear on joints, increased cardiovascular stress and heart attack risks, and increased cancer risk from the extreme oxygen load.

 I should also note that most trainees will never get to be advanced - most of us noodle about somewhere in the intermediate stages and do just fine there. The people who never get to transition from beginner to intermediate are the beginners who start following an advanced training plan and burn out - it's always a question of matching up your actual ability with a training plan designed to get you closer to the next level.

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