Fitness
Moderators: melkor


Stomach weight loss?


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Hi, I'm 13 and female. I weigh 137 pounds and I'm 5"11. My bmi is normal, but right at the peak. My goal is 110 pounds. I have a lot of stomach fat. I play tennis 4-5 hours a day and run about 2 miles every other day. Can anyone give me tips on how to get a flat belly? Excersizes and diet plans? Thank you!!
16 Replies (last)

Hi - did you make a typo?  Because there's no way 5'11" and 137 gives you a BMI at the high end of healthy, if that's what you mean by "peak."

Since you're 13, you should focus on eating plenty of healthy food - you shouldn't be dieting.  Your body is growing and developing, and it needs plenty of nutrition, especially to support 4-5 hours of tennis daily, so don't start restricting food.

cardio

4-5 hours of tennis a day sounds like plenty o' cardio.

Well let's analyze - She claims to be 13. How can you be 13 and play 5 hours of tennis a day? Seems almost impossible to me. Not if you go to school and do homework and sleep at home with your parents.

Also, I probably burn more calories in an hour of hard running than most teenager do in a tennis class. Hitting a ball around for drills burns very minimal calories.

I'm just going by the information given in the post.  I'll own that there are a few puzzling bits of information in the OP, but the 4-5 hours of tennis could be true if she's competitive in junior tennis tournaments. She could be practicing that much each day.  Even if it's an exaggeration, she sounds pretty active.

I doubt she's 5'11", though.

I assume you are actually 5'1 if your goal is 110 lbs.  You are a little too young to start weight lifting.  I would eat healthy, fruits+veggies, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean protein, eat enough to fuel your body, and enjoy being a kid.  You are pretty active.

Original Post by smashley23:

I assume you are actually 5'1 if your goal is 110 lbs.  You are a little too young to start weight lifting.  I would eat healthy, fruits+veggies, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean protein, eat enough to fuel your body, and enjoy being a kid.  You are pretty active.


Why is she too young to start weight lifting?

#8  
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Weightlifting is more then appropriate for a 13 year old. She just needs to be shown how to do it properly so she doesn't affect her body negatively. It should be scaled to what is appropriate.

Young people-younger than 15 can have a lot of trouble with weight lifting, especially if they are lifting close to their max, even if their form is good.  Their epiphyses "growth plates" are vulnerable, considerably more so than in adults.  It's much easier for them to injure themselves.  I heard it can also stunt their growth, but I'm not sure if that's true.

You can make weight training age appropriate, but 13 is too young (in most cases) for an adult heavy  weight lifting routine. Young weight lifters also need supervision from a competent coach or trainer when they lift.  They should not try to teach themselves. 

I would start, if I were 13, with body weight exercises..  Pushups, pullups, squat jumps, lunges etc.

 Also, she would need permission from her parents before she joined a gym, and the gym might have an age limit on weight lifting.

Original Post by smashley23:

Young people-younger than 15 can have a lot of trouble with weight lifting, especially if they are lifting close to their max, even if their form is good.  Their epiphyses "growth plates" are vulnerable, considerably more so than in adults.  It's much easier for them to injure themselves.  I heard it can also stunt their growth, but I'm not sure if that's true.

You can make weight training age appropriate, but 13 is too young (in most cases) for an adult heavy  weight lifting routine. Young weight lifters also need supervision from a competent coach or trainer when they lift.  They should not try to teach themselves. 

I would start, if I were 13, with body weight exercises..  Pushups, pullups, squat jumps, lunges etc.

 Also, she would need permission from her parents before she joined a gym, and the gym might have an age limit on weight lifting.


The bolded is complete tosh.

The Chinese have dozens of eight year olds training to kick butt at future Olympics.

Explain how the body can tell the difference between force loaded on a barbell or dumbell or by putting the body into a mechanically disadvantageous position and performing the same motion?  I'm backing a squat jump to put more force on a 13-year-old girls leg and stress on her joints than her undertaking a weighted back squat. 

If children were crippled by picking up heavy things then we as a species wouldn't have made it this far as up until the last 100-odd years, children have formed a fair percentage of the labour force.

Studies have shown weightlifting to be one of the safest sports children can undertake (I'm not looking it up for you but the study is referenced in an article by Bill Starr @ Starting Strength). 

 

The Chinese also have 2 billion people.  I'm sure they were able to find enough who were skilled at heavy lifting; that does not mean that the typical 13 year old can handle it.  Also, for a long time, our life expectancy wasn't very long.  Of course children made up a large percentage of the labor force.  They also got a lot of injuries/deaths.

what i want to know is if the poster is 5ft 1 or 5 ft 11.  because she claims a goal weight of 110,  so there for all of this is rubbish,  if she wants to be 110 lbs and is 5ft 11 than  it is very underweight and un healthy and anyone advising lifting weights or cardio for such an unhealthy weight is not helping.

Original Post by michaelduff:


The Chinese have dozens of eight year olds training to kick butt at future Olympics.

But at what cost?

The Chinese mentality is also significantly different than that of Western cultures.  Lest this one statement come across as carte blanche to toss all kids into body building routines, let's remember to view the entirety of a Chinese athletic program in context, as well as its intended goal.

Actual guidelines for training children and youths and Misconceptions about youth training fromLon Kilgore who is a professor of Kinesiology at Midwestern State University, and director of the Midwestern State University Strength Research Laboratory & USA Weightlifting Regional Development Center which means he knows what he's talking about as this is his actual profession.

And he recommends: "Properly supervised skill-based weightlifting programs are appropriate for children and can commence as early as 6 years of age."

 All the talk about growth platelets closing prematurely, stunting growth and injury potential is not borne out by the medical literature where properly supervised weight training emerges as pretty much one of the safest activities you can get a kid involved in.

 This is reflected in the National Strength and Conditioning Association's position paper on training youth populations. (PDF warning!)

 Unsupervised training is of course another matter; there injury rates are ...well, still a lot less than for kids playing unsupervised football, american football, baseball, basketball or any other fairly vigorous activity.

Original Post by melkor:


 Unsupervised training is of course another matter; there injury rates are ...well, still a lot less than for kids playing unsupervised football, american football, baseball, basketball or any other fairly vigorous activity.

Even supervised football scares me.  I have a coworker with a son who just turned 10 and he plays football.  They do full tackle and he has been knocked out a few times already - also had to go to a chiropractor for neck and back issues.  I think it is crazy that the young boys are already subject to this extreme stress on their brains and necks and backs at such a young age.

He would probably be much better served and healthier if he took up weightlifting. 

Original Post by weirdfish:

Original Post by michaelduff:


The Chinese have dozens of eight year olds training to kick butt at future Olympics.

But at what cost?

The Chinese mentality is also significantly different than that of Western cultures.  Lest this one statement come across as carte blanche to toss all kids into body building routines, let's remember to view the entirety of a Chinese athletic program in context, as well as its intended goal.

Yes, the Chinese mentality is different.  Discipline, hard work and success.

As against cotton wool, drop out when things get hard and failure.

I'm not raising my kids that way because it brings with it other issues but if you want to be great at anything, then its 10000 hours. 

If weightlifting damaged growth plates in 8yos then China wouldn't do it because it would not have any senior lifters.

Also down through history children didn't die crippled and deformed because they picked up heavy stuff and ruined their growth plates.  Mainly they died because Fleming hadn't been born yet, famine and war.

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