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A substitute for Whey protein for post weight lifting?


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Hello all, in a previous thread concerning New Rules of Lifting for Women, there was a bit of a debate over whether it's necessary to use Whey protein following weight lifting in order to build muscle.

The benefits of whey is that it is quickly absorbed by the body. Regular milk has 20% whey and 80% casein (is this right?) and I understand that casein is slower in absorption (i.e. leaving you fuller, but not feeding your muscles right away?)

Okay, so say I don't really want to buy whey protein (because I don't), what would be a good alternative?

Is it really necessary?

If it is necessary, what brands are not disgusting, but also natural and unsweetened, if any?

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You don't have to take a protein shake to gain muscle. Just eat food. I do it and I've gained about 10 pounds of muscle in about  6 months according to calipers. Make sure you lift a heavier weight overtime and you will gain muscle.
Original Post by tikiremy:

Hello all, in a previous thread concerning New Rules of Lifting for Women, there was a bit of a debate over whether it's necessary to use Whey protein following weight lifting in order to build muscle.

The benefits of whey is that it is quickly absorbed by the body. Regular milk has 20% whey and 80% casein (is this right?) and I understand that casein is slower in absorption (i.e. leaving you fuller, but not feeding your muscles right away?)

Okay, so say I don't really want to buy whey protein (because I don't), what would be a good alternative?

Is it really necessary?

If it is necessary, what brands are not disgusting, but also natural and unsweetened, if any?

No, it isn't really necessary. 

I'm not going to argue the science.  I'm sure there are plenty of studies that point to some marginal increase in muscle gain if you use protein powder within 30 minutes of your workout.  I'm sure this causes people to buy lots of expensive protein powder since that's the easiest way to get lots of protein into your body that quickly.  But for the average non-bodybuilder, eating hundreds of grams of supplimental protein per day doesn't do much more than lighten your wallet.

These are the answers I want to see lol.

So will milk and yogurt shakes be just as good? I don't really buy the whole concept of needing whey protein, but I do understand protein is important.

Watch this video about how they make these supplements

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThdFqGLq4QU

From Bigger, Stronger, Faster - good documentary

I don't drink protein drinks that often, I get most of my protein from food. Milk and cottage cheese are great, although they can also be high in fat and salt. Make sure you eat some carbs pre/post workout too.

 

Original Post by inkblue:

Watch this video about how they make these supplements

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThdFqGLq4QU

From Bigger, Stronger, Faster - good documentary

 I'll check it out as soon as I get off work: can't access youtube here!

I was big on protein shakes after a workout several years ago now I do not use them. To tell the truth I do not recognize any difference in my muscle mass. I use Whey shakes in the morning because the protein helps me stay full longer.

Original Post by inkblue:

Watch this video about how they make these supplements

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThdFqGLq4QU

From Bigger, Stronger, Faster - good documentary

It is a good documentary, but I don't think of protein powder in the same category as those pills that he was making.

The protein powder that I'll have if I want to get some protein quickly and easily after a workout has these ingredients: protein blend (whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, whey peptides); artificial flavor; lecithin; acesulfame potassium; aminogen; lactase. 

Sure, it's got some artificial stuff in there (the acesulfame potassium is an artificial sweetener), but then again, I'm not really a clean eater - I like my diet coke with my vodka.

Protein powders aren't magic, they are just for convenience.

I just drink chocolate milk after my workouts. There have been tons of studies done on how it is one of the best things to drink after an intense workout, despite the fact that milk is made up mainly of casein. You can't beat the taste or the price either..LOL

The hard thing is forcing myself to only drink it on workout days. I would drink chocolate milk all day everyday if I could.

All I want to put in my body after a workout is salad. So that's what I eat. Lots of greens and chopped veggies, some nuts and seeds, maybe a little crumbled tofu...yum, now I'm hungry.

Original Post by vyperman7:

I just drink chocolate milk after my workouts. There have been tons of studies done on how it is one of the best things to drink after an intense workout, despite the fact that milk is made up mainly of casein. You can't beat the taste or the price either..LOL

The hard thing is forcing myself to only drink it on workout days. I would drink chocolate milk all day everyday if I could.

About the chocolate milk thing, I was curious about that. Why chocolate milk? I mean, what separates it from regular milk? Is it the extra sugar that makes it best? Not that I'm complaining, I'm a chocoholic lol.

I drink a protein mix after my weight lifting sessions but its only because i have noticed a huge difference when it comes to muscle soreness.  I am not nearly as sore if I chug a little whey right after.  I tried the chocolate milk and it didn't quite do it for me, although I love that stuff!!!  I only take about half the recommended amount of whey and it works fine.

http://stronglifts.com/milk-post-workout-buil d-muscle-gains/

 

Good article about the benefits of milk vs whey powder supplements

#14  
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wow nice article about milk, too bad if you are lactose intolerant .... This article reminded me about a lecture I heard about superfluousness commercial baby food because breast milk is the best thing for a baby. 

I buy smoked turkey breast from the deli and roll up a few with slices of raw green peppers inside or a sliver of cheddar cheese.  I eat 2 or 3 of those after my weight training.

IMO to promote muscle repair, its especially important to have protein just before bedtime.  I have 12 oz of 1% milk about an hour before bedtime.  Those are the only "liquid calories" in my diet.

Of course, you need to be pushing yourself in the gym to create a need for muslcle repair in the body...

Here is an article by Registered Dietitian and blogger Andy Bellati about chocolate milk as a post-workout drink.

Original Post by mephyle:

Here is an article by Registered Dietitian and blogger Andy Bellati about chocolate milk as a post-workout drink.

Nah, that's not about its uses as a PWO drink where it's pretty much ideal, that's just him ragging on yet another Men's health idiocy of taking a useful concept and turning it stupid by overdoing it. 

 You need carbs and protein in a 4:1 ratio post-workout for optimal glycogen and muscle protein resynthesis, which happens to be the ratio in chocolate milk so you can skip the expensive sport supplements and go for the ubiquitously available food item - and turning it stupid by thinking that if 500 ml of chocolate milk immediately after a workout is good, drinking a lot of it at random times during the day would surely be better.

The post workout window is quite overated in my opinion.

It's probably unecessary for someone just trying to lose a little weight and look a little better.

In that scenario, whether they drink a protein shake/choc milk within xx minutes of lifting or decide to consume a meal probably doesnt make a blind bit of difference.

Just my opinion.

Original Post by littlesimongeorge:

The post workout window is quite overated in my opinion.

It's probably unecessary for someone just trying to lose a little weight and look a little better.

In that scenario, whether they drink a protein shake/choc milk within xx minutes of lifting or decide to consume a meal probably doesnt make a blind bit of difference.

Just my opinion.

Yeah, from what I've read, and the train of thought I follow now, is that a) insulin is usually spiked plenty pre-workout from carryover from a previous meal, or theres already enough amino acids floating around in the bloodstream, so the "pre" sort of already counts as the post, and b) worrying about refilling glycogen should be left to "real" athletes who have multiple glycogen-depleting bouts soon after another.

 

The post workout "window" actually goes on for 24 hours, and those famous studies on PWO absorption window and whatever were done with depleted/fasted subjects, if I remember right, making them rather inapplicable to regular society and everyday life

I'm 40 years old, I need every advantage I can get - and this is one point where Lyle, Alan, Martin and I are on the same page ;)

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