Fitness
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The Track Size - How many miles


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Hi,

I'm sort of new to this website (i haven't been doing my logs regularily lately), This is my first time  posting on a forum.

I'm trying to start running again because my body is not in teh shape that it used to be and hasn't been for a long long time!!! :( But I know that I need to eat healthy and exercise.

I want to start by jogging at a nearby track and field and normally i can run maybe 3-5 laps (depending how much my body can handle that day and sometimes i might run fast or slowly). I walk the rest (medium speed, although slow right after i finish a lap). I do this of a total of 1-1.5 hour. I dn't force my body to really push what I know i can't do - b/c i dont want to collapse in front of strangers.

However, I just want to know how mcuh should i run a day? How many miles is one track and field (It looks like a normal sized field that a highschool or university might have..... ) How many laps should i run a day (4 days/week) to lose maybe 5-8lbs effectively and reasonably fast? 

I consume probably around 1200-1500kcals a day and I weigh about 131-132lbs, and 5'3. - if these info help. :)

 

I just want to be healthy and fit :(... so please help, if you can.

 

thank you very much! Cool

10 Replies (last)

the track around the high school football field near me is 4 laps = 4 miles.

The length of a track can really vary though, depending on the size of the field, and how close the track runs to the field.  Some schools a track will be based on feet/miles, other tracks will be based on meters.

Your best bet would be to contact the school who's track you're running on and just ask.  Or, if you see others on the track regularly exercising, ask them!  If someone came up to me and said "This may be a silly question, but how many laps to a mile on this track?"  I would happily answer "4 laps" and never think twice about the fact they had to ask Laughing

Hey!

 

Thanks for your help! I really appreciate it! I just might ask people and see if they know ^^

In the US a standard outdoor track used to be 440 yards and 4 laps equaled 1 mile.  Today tracks have been remarked in meters with the typical track now being 400 meters to a lap; 1600 meters or 4 laps is still the equivalent of a mile.  But as mentioned above it is possible, but not likely, that the track you are on is not a standard size.

omg i just remembered this and thought i would share :)

i always hated running but played a decent game of soccer... 

i was working in a building that had a fitness facility and a middle school with a track across the street. a co-worker and i started running the fences, but i had to take my soccer ball and dribble the fences to make me break through the "i hate running" mindset.

then i started connecting the fences...running two and so on. eventually i was going to the track and dribbling laps inside the track, and then at some point i decided the soccer ball was holding me back.

its all about personal bests. every day.

Cool

 

The inside lane of the track is the one that is 400 meters.  Running the outside lane of the track will be longer than the standard 400 meters for a complete lap.

On a typical 400 meter track, if you are in lane 8 (the outside lane) it will end up being like a mile and an eighth (1 1/8).  Just and FYI.... I teach a walking class for my graduate assistantship in school which is paying for my Master's degree. Wink

#7  
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Glad to hear that you're getting back into exercising - running is great!

Don't forget to take it easy, though - if you haven't exercised much in a while, and especially if you haven't run much in a while, be sure to build up slowly. Running a mile 3-5 days a week to start seems pretty reasonable, as long as you aren't getting any aches and pains that get worse, not better, from one run to the next. The rule of thumb for increasing running distance is to add no more than 10% to your total running distance from week to week, and increase your longest run by no more than 10%. So if you run 4 miles a week a mile at a time, next week run no more than 4.4 miles, and make your longest run no longer than 1.1 mile. You can vary from this a little (if you wanted to have one day be a 'long run' day, you could maybe push one day from 1 mile to 1.25 miles, and increase the other days by smaller amounts), but if you increase what you're doing too quickly, there are a whole host of really annoying, really common overtraining injuries that can set you back by half a year. Much better to just go slow!

/thanks for your help. :)

Thanks for the info! ^^

Original Post by kriklaf:

Glad to hear that you're getting back into exercising - running is great!

Don't forget to take it easy, though - if you haven't exercised much in a while, and especially if you haven't run much in a while, be sure to build up slowly. Running a mile 3-5 days a week to start seems pretty reasonable, as long as you aren't getting any aches and pains that get worse, not better, from one run to the next. The rule of thumb for increasing running distance is to add no more than 10% to your total running distance from week to week, and increase your longest run by no more than 10%. So if you run 4 miles a week a mile at a time, next week run no more than 4.4 miles, and make your longest run no longer than 1.1 mile. You can vary from this a little (if you wanted to have one day be a 'long run' day, you could maybe push one day from 1 mile to 1.25 miles, and increase the other days by smaller amounts), but if you increase what you're doing too quickly, there are a whole host of really annoying, really common overtraining injuries that can set you back by half a year. Much better to just go slow!

Thanks for your help!!! :) very informative

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