Fitness
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Day to Day, Week to Week, Month to Month Weight fluctuations


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How do the variations in weight react to becoming more fit? I was looking at my weight log and there was a point last year when my weight dropped 4 pounds in 1 week. This was using fairly closely controlled conditions. Weigh first thing in the morning same day of the week with (relatively speaking) the same meals each day before.

Question: Do variations in weigh over a certain period of time decrease as fitness increases?

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I am not sure I understand your question completely?

Last year I averaged only about 1 pound of loss a month- but I think I lost better in the inches department.  However since March ( just in the last month) I've dropped 4 pounds because I've been refocusing on eating "cleaner" and less processed foods.  I am also pushing myself more on the weight lifting - trying to lift heavier at least one lift per session.  I don't do 'cardio' I only do metabolic work.

I know when you first start on a weight loss journey you can have significant losses then it slows down, then of course you get into the platueus and stuff.  I'm not sure if its "fitness" related since I think my fitness levels are better now than they were a few months ago, yet my weight loss has increased recently.   Just too many variables.

 

Well the amount of variance due to water can be size related. So larger st deviation but since the larger standard devuation is also around the larger number the %CV (percent coeficient of variance) will be about the same

 

db, it was more a process variability or margin of error thing. I am wondering if: as you become fitter your body does a better job processing, regulating and disposing of waste therefore reducing variability in weight. 

balt, It's been some time since my last statistics class and I'm not sure I want to drag that whole expereice up again;P

ok if you weight 300 lbs and have a weight swing of 3 lbs, then proportionally that is the same thing as a 100lb person who has a weight swing of 1 lb.

That is what i was saying in laymans terms. In each case there is a 1% CV [ ( st deviation/mean) *100]

So as you slim down the real weight change will go down but the % weight change should remain about the same.

FYI stats was always more fun then calc.

I've been maintaining since 2010 and I work out not to gain muscle or lose fat, but just to stay healthy and maintain the definition. However, my weight fluctuates from day to day. Not so much from week to week or month to month. But practically every day the weight is different.

Having said that, I think you bring up the valid point that body is now doing a better job of keeping to specific weight, even after big overeating or restrictions (when sick).

Original Post by baltimoreamt:

ok if you weight 300 lbs and have a weight swing of 3 lbs, then proportionally that is the same thing as a 100lb person who has a weight swing of 1 lb.

That is what i was saying in laymans terms. In each case there is a 1% CV [ ( st deviation/mean) *100]

So as you slim down the real weight change will go down but the % weight change should remain about the same.

FYI stats was always more fun then calc.

and US History more fun than both of'em put together;)

From the point of glycogen storage (that is how you store carbs in your liver and muscles), you should see larger fluctuations the fitter you get. Your stores get larger, and your workouts get longer or harder as well. Glycogen is stored along with water, and you lose the water when you burn the glycogen. If you burn a lot of glycogen in a big workout, it can take more than a day to replace the weight. If you eat low carb, it takes longer, or might not come back at all (a bad thing IMO). It can be a difference of about 4 pounds, but two pounds is more common.

 

Original Post by oldguysrule:

From the point of glycogen storage (that is how you store carbs in your liver and muscles), you should see larger fluctuations the fitter you get. Your stores get larger, and your workouts get longer or harder as well. Glycogen is stored along with water, and you lose the water when you burn the glycogen. If you burn a lot of glycogen in a big workout, it can take more than a day to replace the weight. If you eat low carb, it takes longer, or might not come back at all (a bad thing IMO). It can be a difference of about 4 pounds, but two pounds is more common.

 

Well OGR, It's not US History but it is a plausible, understandable, succinct answer to my question. Thanks!

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