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Is it ok to work out 7 days a week?


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Hi...just curious if you think it is ok to work out 7 days a week straight or is it essential to have a day or two off in between? I usually do heavy weights with my trainer on Tues and Thurs and then cardio on the other days. Is this too hard for my body to recover from?

Thanks for your feedback and opinions!

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Do have at least one day off a week, if not two!

Original Post by starp33:

Hi...just curious if you think it is ok to work out 7 days a week straight or is it essential to have a day or two off in between? I usually have do heavy weights with my trainer on Tues and Thurs and then cardio on the other days. Is this too hard for my body to recover from?

Thanks for your feedback and opinions!

It depends on (i) what your goals are; (ii) what intensity and volume you are doing; and (iii) at what training level you are at.

The fact you are asking doesn't bode well.

Depends what your goals are. But generally speaking, every muscle, even the ones used for cardio, need rest days or you are asking for an injury. 

I think sometimes, for some of us anyway, that we forget not only does taking an occasional break from exercising benefit the body, but it can do wonders for the mind.  I have found, for example, that even taking 3 or 4 days off makes me feel really refreshed and eager to get back to exercising.

I suggest taking a day off every 7-10 days is good, but have not done enough research to list any professional support.

depends how hard you are working out. 

7 days is okay as long as you're not overtraining-- if you feel tired, irritable, moody, your appetite isn't normal or you're not sleeping regularly it could be a sign that you are overtraining

you should try to take about 1-2 days off per week, or at least just do something light-- such as an easy steady state cardio session 

How old are you (ish, just looking for a range)? Any joint/tendon problems in the past (or new ones)? Any suss aches or pains that persist beyond the actual workout (other than delayed onset muscle soreness)?

How long have you been working out? Have you been doing cardio for a while and are just now adding in the weights, or are you starting a full-on 7-day program after a period of inactivity/for the first time?

How hard do you work out - are you doing HIIT or lots of resistance on the machines? 

Have you worked out in the past (ie are you drawing from muscle memory)?

I am 34 years old, have always been active and exercised since I was a teenager. I just started working out with a trainer about 4 months ago after gaining about 8 pounds over the summer. Since having the personal training and making adjustments to my diet, I have seen a huge improvement in my strength, core stability, and fat reduction. However, the weight is still the same and I haven't lost a pound. I was hoping the 4-5 days of cardio would help to burn more calories and I would eventually start to see a change in the weight category.

I do not have any obvious injuries except for the occasional achy knees after a hard day of squats and lunges. I had a lot of muscle soreness initially, but now only after an intense day of weight training.

When I do cardio, I work out pretty hard--about 75-85% of my maximum heart rate (I wear a heart monitor). Some days when I do HIIT training, my heart will go almost to 90%. But there are days when I ease things up and just keep the intensity to a minimum rather than not going to the gym at all. It is these days that I wonder if I should just skip and let my body rest up.

Thanks so much for your helpful, supportive responses.

Well, if you're not tired, and are eating enough to support that level of activity (are you?), and nothing hurts, and the min-intensity days really are that, I  (an average jane; anticipate comment from others around overtraining risks)  can't see why you shouldn't in principle. After all, 60-90 mins of daily moderate exercise is recommended to maintain weight loss. 1 day of rest and/or stretching/flexibility would probably be not a bad thing. Would let your body do the talking (if you feel tired, take a break).

But if you're seeing fat & inches go away, and your fitness goals are being met, why are you worried about pounds?

edit: but you are doing at least some HIIT days going to 90% hr, which is not moderate. since i have no idea how to compare however many minutes of that against 60-90 mins moderate, i won't try. will guess that a day off might do you good.

Original Post by starp33:

Hi...just curious if you think it is ok to work out 7 days a week straight or is it essential to have a day or two off in between? I usually have do heavy weights with my trainer on Tues and Thurs and then cardio on the other days. Is this too hard for my body to recover from?

Thanks for your feedback and opinions!

What you are describing is generally the limit.  Your body needs rest in order to repair itself and therefore grow.  That's how muscles get stronger.  If you are constantly pushing them without any recovery time, then you're not allowing yourself to actually get stronger by letting your muscles repair the microscopic tears that actually signify growth and strength.

1-2 days per week of complete rest.  It also keeps the mind fresh so that a person doesn't burn out.

Original Post by janelovesjam:

Well, if you're not tired, and are eating enough to support that level of activity (are you?), and nothing hurts, and the min-intensity days really are that, I  (an average jane; anticipate comment from others around overtraining risks)  can't see why you shouldn't in principle. After all, 60-90 mins of daily moderate exercise is recommended to maintain weight loss. 1 day of rest and/or stretching/flexibility would probably be not a bad thing. Would let your body do the talking (if you feel tired, take a break).

But if you're seeing fat & inches go away, and your fitness goals are being met, why are you worried about pounds?

edit: but you are doing at least some HIIT days going to 90% hr, which is not moderate. since i have no idea how to compare however many minutes of that against 60-90 mins moderate, i won't try. will guess that a day off might do you good.

Unfortunately, you are quoting the CDC page out of context.  It doesn't say 60-90 minutes per day every day.  It says:

"People who have lost weight and kept it off typically engage in 60—90 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week while not exceeding calorie needs. This doesn't necessarily mean 60—90 minutes at one time. It might mean 20—30 minutes of physical activity three times a day."

 

Thanks for the correction!

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