Fitness
Moderators: melkor


Yoga AND Pilates


Quote  |  Reply

Okay so I have a question and I need some input. My school offers a variety of gym classes and since next semester is my last semester I thought I would give some of them a try since I have always had an interest in them. The only ones I can fit in my schedule is Pilates, yoga and belly dancing. The Pilates and yoga class however is on the same day an hour apart so I would get a break in between them. Would it still be too much to do them that close in the same day? I have never taken them so I don't know what to expect and I really don't know if it would be too much in one day. What do you guys think?

14 Replies (last)
#1  
Quote  |  Reply

what type of yoga do they offer? if it's hatha, no big deal, if vinyasa or another type of flow yoga, the question is how in shape r u? pilates is mostlty core work yoga depends on wether it's faster up down like calestenics, or slow and mediatative like hatha with slow stratches. it is doable . how many days a week?

It doesn't really say what yoga it is it just say yoga. It's only two days a week and both classes are an hour each and there is an hour and a half break between the classes so it's not back to back. I am worried if Pilates would make me too weak to hold the poses in yoga. I really want to take them both if possible.

#3  
Quote  |  Reply
Take them both, you won't regret it!

I think I am going to. Hopefully it doesn't wear me out too much! I could use some strength training (if those even count).

#5  
Quote  |  Reply

pilates  and yoga very similair as i take both. pilates alot of core work and thigh work. yoga more full body , i say take them both especially if free and available. you will find moves under each disapline that will help you get in shape. last nite i got a solo pilates class (no one else showed up for class) so we did alot of pliate type ballet moves i can feel my thighs today. yoga tonite should help stretch it out. have fun enjoy

Original Post by sydney114:

I think I am going to. Hopefully it doesn't wear me out too much! I could use some strength training (if those even count).

nope does not count as strength training.  From the strength training programs I've done they claim yoga / pilates would be more good for rest days / stretching

Original Post by dbackerfan:

Original Post by sydney114:

I think I am going to. Hopefully it doesn't wear me out too much! I could use some strength training (if those even count).

nope does not count as strength training.  From the strength training programs I've done they claim yoga / pilates would be more good for rest days / stretching

I'll delightfully contest that, as I've had notably strength gains  (and visible muscles) from pilates alone. At the heart of it all, is resistance. If you are weak or unfit, pilates will offer a challenge as you are working against your own body weight. If you gain strength from body weight resistance, is it not strength training? Eventually you'll reach a baseline where your own body weight is not as effective; from there you can explore traditional strength training programs, or dive deeper into pilates with the various apparatuses that offer more resistance.

I'll fully admit to being a pilates fan girl, cause its worked for me and my goals. Some people like straight up weight lifting, and if that works for them, cool, whatever. but to say that pilates is not strength training, well that's just a bit disingenuous.

It depends on your fitness level if you are already fit you may be able to do both but as a beginner for both it may be to much to do 2 hours in one day

 

Pilates training started life as rehabilitation training for wounded, bedridden WWI POWs when Joseph Pilates was an interned German nurse in a British POW camp.

 It was further developed when he moved to the US after the war and started his training studio, offering rehabilitation training for Broadway dancers injured on the job.

 So if you've had bits of you shot off in WWI and you're training to be able to get out of bed, or if you're a dancer with a sprain and training to retain function and mobility plus some pre/rehab work to prevent further injuries when you return to your Broadway career it's a decent option.

 If you're not in need of rehabilitation due to war wounds or other mobility-impairing injuries it's not actually a good way to train; it's corrective therapy and if you train to correct issues you don't actually have you'll gain muscle imbalances and other issues.

 It does qualify as strength training for the rawest of beginners or for rehab patients, but to qualify as strength training you need to train with a sufficient amount of resistance to disrupt your body's current homeostasis and force it to adapt. For someone who've never trained a day in their life before this can be accomplished with as little as 40% of their 1RM in the first few weeks of training, but once you're past the immediate neural adaptation stage and count as an actual beginner instead of a couch potato you need to cross the 60% threshold, and after 6-8 weeks you'll need to cross the 80% threshold to have a strength training effect. Give it 6 months of progress and you'll need to train at 90% of your 1RM to have a strength training effect.

 To suggest then, that bodyweight rehab training can double as strength training for anyone outside of complete beginners is misunderstanding what strength training is.

 You can still train strength endurance with Pilates, and flexibility - though yoga's better for that. And some of the machine workouts that Joseph cribbed off adapting old gymnastics equipment to his rehab workouts can continue to be useful past the first couple months, but again, at that point you're better off picking up a barbell instead of training to rehabilitate an injury you don't actually have.

#10  
Quote  |  Reply

once again you give the same reply to pilates, must cut and paste. pilates and yoga can be great work outs and give you great muscle deffinition it all depends on how good an instructor you have and what you put into it. i have gone down from 210 to 152 size 16 -8 doing yoga 3-4 days a week and pilates 1 day a week . have carved arms, three lines down my stomach and defined legs, not bad for 48 years old. no running and no heavy lifting booo yahhh

My answer doesn't change, because the facts about Pilates, Yoga and fitness doesn't change. My yoga teacher was born in India and studied Asthanga straight under Sri Pattabhi Jois in Mysore, but he still lifts weights with me and does some running on the side because yoga isn't sufficient training.

 Doing yoga for the fitness benefits is like using a $15,000 laptop as a doorstop - sure, it works to some extent, but you've kinda missed the point.

Original Post by tggerlady:

once again you give the same reply to pilates, must cut and paste. pilates and yoga can be great work outs and give you great muscle deffinition it all depends on how good an instructor you have and what you put into it. i have gone down from 210 to 152 size 16 -8 doing yoga 3-4 days a week and pilates 1 day a week . have carved arms, three lines down my stomach and defined legs, not bad for 48 years old. no running and no heavy lifting booo yahhh

Well I am 52 weigh 160- 162 and 5'6" and can fit into a size 6 now.  I have a nice 4 pack and my obliques are shaping up nicely as well ( I still have some fat to lose to reveal the full 6 pack)  I have legs I've dreamed for - and arms I've also dreamt about.  

I lift heavy I don't run cause I have shin splints, I don't do any cardio on machines.  I would do yoga for the stretching benefits or pilates but of course the classes at the gym for these things are while I am at work.  

 

Original Post by melkor:

it's corrective therapy and if you train to correct issues you don't actually have you'll gain muscle imbalances and other issues.

Would this be the case in an ordinary, well-structured Pilates class, that addresses most body 'parts', with equal emphasis on opposite motions?

Also, to what degree might Pilates mitigate muscle loss in an 'advanced' beginner 'exerciser' (eg a calisthenics/comparatively lightish weights/metabolic 'circuit' trained person, who may or may not have Broadway aspirations)?

Finally, what say you to aerial silk training? (that is a serious question!) 

Wow! Lots of replies! Thanks for all the input. I wasn't sure if they counted as strength training since people seem to argue back and forth that they are or are not. Sounds like some people really benefit from them though.  I do get cardio in when I have time to workout but I am definitely lacking in the strength area. Since I am so weak it may serve as some kind of strength training until I master it. I am going to be working out a lot this summer so hopefully that will help build up some endurance so I am not dying in the classes. 

14 Replies
Advertisement
Advertisement