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Adding whey protein powder to coffee?


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I usually add half a scoop or a whole scoop of vanilla whey protein powder to my greek yogurt or oatmeal for breakfast.  I've read somewhere that people add it to their coffee instead of milk.  I tried to do this, and it got all lumpy and gross, no matter how much I stirred.  Still drinkable, but I couldn't help think I was drinking coffee with curdled milk.  Did I do something wrong here, or does adding whey protein powder to coffee just not work?

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Try a different brand of whey. Some do not dissolve very well.  The GNC brand seems to disolve better then some of the other brands I have found. Sometimes acidic or caffinated beverages block the absorbson of certain things so may want to run by a nutritionist that you have been doing this. I know certain supplements specify do not mix with acidic or caffinated beverages. Not sure about whey.

Go figure, it was GNC brand that I used. :)

 

Well, I just thought I'd experiment, but I'll stick to adding the powder to other stuff, I guess.  Thanks for your reply!

This caught my eye because this is exactly what I do.  I use the EAS brand of 100% whey powder.  It's supposed to dissolve well.  However, I initially had trouble with it clumping and making chewy lumps.  Here's what I found:

1) If I scooped it into the cup and added coffee on top of it, it was hard to dissolve and clumpy.

2) If I dumped a really packed scoop into the coffee it was hard to dissolve and clumpy.

3) What works: I fill my travel mug ~ 3/4 full with coffee and then in the protein powder container, I use the scoop to "fluff" the powder.  I then scoop the fluffed powder, being careful not to pack it into the scoop.  I tap it out of the scoop & into the coffee and then stir it in vigorously with a spoon, changing stirring directions every 5-10 seconds.  I'll then add a little more powder since my first scoop is usually about 3/4 of a scoop.  The key is that you want the powder to be loosly packed so that there is lots of surface area for liquid contact allowing it to dissolve rather than clump (yes, I'm an engineer).  Laughing

This is the cc link for the powder I log.

http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-eas-10 0-percent-whey-protein-i84161

hmm this interests me. I use Body Fortress from Walmart....just like that best. But I don't get vanilla (NOT a vanilla fan) I just get chocolate.....

...anyone tried that? And are you replacing the milk/cream completely?

Original Post by madetoshine:

Still drinkable, but I couldn't help think I was drinking coffee with curdled milk. 

 

 Well, technically, that is what you're drinking! Laughing

I like the EAS brand too.  You can mix it up with your milk first if that helps.

When you heat whey protein it denatures the protein structure. Body builders who most commonly benefit from whey advice to add it to any heated meal or drink like coffee when it cools off a bit, not when its too hot. Thats why you get lumps instead of an easy mix.

 

"When a protein is denatured, the molecule's tertiary structure is corrupted. This disruption affects the molecule's secondary (helical) structure without altering its primary structure. In other words, denaturation does not break any of the primary chemical bonds that link one amino acid to another but it changes the way the protein folds in upon itself. Denaturation occurs when proteins are exposed to strong acids or bases, high concentrations of inorganic salts, or organic solvents such as alcohol. In addition, heat or irradiation can cause denaturation. When the three-dimensional structure of the protein is disrupted, the molecule's biological activity is affected. Therefore, enzymes do not have the same catalytic function when they are denatured.

Denaturation can have many detrimental side effects. In biological systems, denatured proteins can result in illness or worst. In fact protein denaturation is linked to many diseases such as prion encephalopathies, Alzheimer's disease and dementias.

As for the stiffening, that's the result of the denatured proteins. It's gelling like pudding or jello because it's denatured. I think we all know how bio-available jello is compared to protein powder"

 

here's more info on this. so be careful when heating whey.

 

"Let there be no mistake, heat damages protein. Especially whey protein. Heat processing ruptures and reforms protein molecules. It's called denaturing, and it makes digestion and absorption difficult.

Scientific studies clearly show that when heat is used to dry protein it burns thousands of cross-linked bonds into the original amino acid structure. When this denatured protein is ingested, the enzymes in your intestines work overtime to break it down. It takes awhile, and for many can be quite uncomfortable. When all is said and done, little protein is actually absorbed and any resulting nitrogen retention is negligible. The worst thing about drying whey protein in this manner is that it destroys highly valuable immunoglobulin fractions.:

I like protein powder in my coffee too.  I put in a little at a time, stirring after each addition.  It dissolves well.  I love it.

Woops, I didn't read all of bananee's post before replying.  Maybe my next time I add whey to my coffee, I'll make it and iced coffee. :)

its ok to add whey protein to hot foods, just not when they're too hot. They can add it when the foods have cooled off a bit, so that the protein remains almost not affected by heat. It needs a certain amount of heat to denature it (about 70 degrees).

Yikes.  Thanks for the info, bananee.  I'll definitely be careful about this in the future and will only add it to well-cooled down oatmeal.

So does this mean you should not add whey to baked goods, like in muffins, because they would have to bake at a high temperature?

EDIT:deleted post

No sorry. You shouldnt add whey protein to baked goods. But I did find some recipes that are No-bake that could be as good and then you could really benefit from the whey you have.

 

No-Bake Cheese Cake:

1 Cup boiling water
1/2 -1 package (1/4 ounce size) Unflavored Gelatin
1/8-1/4 Cup Splenda (you can add 1/8, taste the filling then adjust)
1 Cup Lowfat Cottage Cheese
1 Cup fresh fruit pieces, low-fat caramel sauce or lowfat chocolate sauce
4-6 scoops of protein powder
1 (9 inch) low fat graham cracker pie crust

Stir boiling water into gelatin in small bowl 2 to 3 minutes or until completely dissolved; cool below 140 F. Pour into blender container. Add cottage cheese and protein powder; cover. Blend until smooth; pour over crust.

Refrigerate 1 hour or until set. Arrange fruit on top of cheesecake or pour sauce over individual slices when served. Garnish with thawed fat-free whipped topping.

No Bake Oatmeal Cookies:

2 cups Splenda
4 tablespoons cocoa powder
1 teaspoon vanilla
2/3 cup milk
3/4-1 cup peanut butter
6-8 scoops protein powder
3 cups oats


Bring the first 4 ingredients to a boil and remove from heat and let coo to 140. Add peanut butter, protein powder and oats; mix well. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto waxed paper. Let cool until set.

 

 

I havent personaly tried these, but you could try them out and see how that goes.

here's another recipe I found :)

another batch of no-bake cookies made with chocolate whey protein.

 

http://www.answerfitness.com/80/healthy-no-ba ke-cookies-healthy-recipes/

Mmm I love no bake cookies, so these sound good!  I might have to give them a try, thank you so much!

Original Post by bananee:

When you heat whey protein it denatures the protein structure. Body builders who most commonly benefit from whey advice to add it to any heated meal or drink like coffee when it cools off a bit, not when its too hot. Thats why you get lumps instead of an easy mix.


This is why i take 1/2 a cup of coffee and throw it in the blender with 1/2 cup of ice cold milk, then i add a scoop of vanilla EAS protein and mix it again and then throw in some ice and VIOLA!

Yummy Iced Coffee!

hmm id actually have to give that iced coffee a try :D yummy (and the cookies too)

and madetoshine, you welcome ;)

Original Post by bananee:

its ok to add whey protein to hot foods, just not when they're too hot. They can add it when the foods have cooled off a bit, so that the protein remains almost not affected by heat. It needs a certain amount of heat to denature it (about 70 degrees).

That doesn't matter.  What do you think happens to eggs or chicken when you cook it?  When egg whites become white...that is denatured.  When chicken stops being pink...same thing.

All denaturing means is that the secondary amino acid structure is released.  It does nothing to the availability of the protein.

hmm I wouldnt make up what I wrote. Heat ruins protein and significantly interferes with how amino acids interact within the body biochemically. Heat is used on meat and such because we are at risk of ingesting parasites or any sort of microorganism that can affect our body negatively if we dont cook it. Thats why we dont eat raw meat. So why heat whey? when its "cleaner" and you could benefit from its real nutritional value in its more pure state without any risks of getting harmed?

I found this on a site where body builders were discussing it. I bet they know pretty much all there is to know about whey protein and protein in general, since buiding muscles by consuming protein is what they do. Also on many other reports show for it too. My trainer back home also didnt recommend heating whey, and my nutritionist also agreed.  You can even look for it on wikipedia. Whey protein is not meant to be heated, hence the reason why it gets most affected by heat.

This is also why people talk about not overcooking any sort of meat. When you do cook meat you do lose some of its valuable nutrition, but ofcourse we are not going to have raw egg whites or chicken.

IF you want to get all the nutritional value from whey, why heat it? when its meant to have cold in the form of shakes and such.

Read the rest of the post I made...but thats entirely up to people if they want to heat whey, then so be it. I rather have whey cold, and really benefit from its nutritional value, rather than denaturing it and just turn it into another piece of normal meat I can have.

EDIT: I also found this

 

there is something even more special about whey, especially for athletes and those of us committed to the active lifestyle. Whey contains an extensive range of remarkable proteins called “whey peptides” which provide the highest quality source of protein known — higher than eggs, fish, turkey, beef or soy. But the real bonus lies in how whey peptides are extracted, concentrated and isolated - without heat.

another reason why not to heat whey.

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