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Adding whey protein powder to coffee?


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I usually add half a scoop or a whole scoop of vanilla whey protein powder to my greek yogurt or oatmeal for breakfast.  I've read somewhere that people add it to their coffee instead of milk.  I tried to do this, and it got all lumpy and gross, no matter how much I stirred.  Still drinkable, but I couldn't help think I was drinking coffee with curdled milk.  Did I do something wrong here, or does adding whey protein powder to coffee just not work?

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Whey protein can be denatured by heat. High heat (like the sustained high temperatures above 72 degrees Celsius (160 degrees Fahrenheit) associated with the pasteurization process) denatures whey proteins, destroying some bioactive compounds, such as the amino acid cysteine. While native whey protein does not aggregate upon renneting or acidification of milk, denaturing the whey protein triggers hydrophobic interactions with other proteins, and the formation of disulfide bonds between whey proteins and casein micelles, leading to aggregation with other milk proteins at low pH.

 

Wikipedia

Original Post by dr1zztth3hunt3r:

Whey protein can be denatured by heat. High heat (like the sustained high temperatures above 72 degrees Celsius (160 degrees Fahrenheit) associated with the pasteurization process) denatures whey proteins, destroying some bioactive compounds, such as the amino acid cysteine. While native whey protein does not aggregate upon renneting or acidification of milk, denaturing the whey protein triggers hydrophobic interactions with other proteins, and the formation of disulfide bonds between whey proteins and casein micelles, leading to aggregation with other milk proteins at low pH.

 

Wikipedia

And this affects results how?  It doesn't.  All protein is denatured when heated and during digestion.  The whole 'don't denature whey' was a marketing gimmick to sell specialized whey formula.

Quick nutrition question for you protein powder and coffee drinkers. First, I never thought of adding protein powder to my coffee so thanks. I'll have to try it.

The nutrition question is that I have read that coffee blocks the absorbtion (the caffine does) of some nutrients, most particularly iron. They say to make sure to have finished eating before drinking colas or coffees to help your body fully absorb the nutrients. Does anyone know whether or not the protein powder added to the coffee retains its nutritional benefits or does the caffine block all or some of it?

once again I say....believe what you want to believe....but personaly I dont think its a gimmick at all.

I still think its a horrible idea to put heat on whey...but hey, everyone does their own thing, and thats fine ;)

All protein is denatured when heated and during digestion' - this is what I've heard, and I've heard that heating it does affect 'bioavailability', but I've never seen a clear explanation of what that means (if anything!).

It affects how the body digests it.

also some of its nutritional value is lost when heated.

Original Post by bananee:

It affects how the body digests it.

also some of its nutritional value is lost when heated.

As does with ANY protein.  Whey is not unique in that respect.

Do you cook with ricotta cheese?  Ricotta is whey.

Original Post by for_zev:

Original Post by bananee:

It affects how the body digests it.

also some of its nutritional value is lost when heated.

As does with ANY protein.  Whey is not unique in that respect.

Do you cook with ricotta cheese?  Ricotta is whey.

ok exactly. If it is the "same" as any other sort of protein source, and it DOES lose nutritional value when cooked...why cook whey then? when you can benefit from all its nutritional value?

THATS my point. I didnt say that cooking whey was wrong, I just said that it wasnt the BEST idea...because it really isnt.

whey protein shakes are made for a reason....so why heat it?

I think this is being blown out of proportion.  I searched the web and couldn't  find a satisfactory answer one way or the other.  The truth is likely in the middle somewhere.  I e-mailed EAS out of curiosity.  Here is my question and their response:

My question to EAS:

I currently use your chocolate 100% whey protein powder. I mix it in my coffee every morning and it's great. Recently, on discussion boards, the topic has been brought up that heat will "destroy" the protein, rendering it less effective. I'm wondering if you can comment on this. I've seen recipes for protein bars using whey powder and they bake the bars at temperatures higher than fresh coffee. Also, we cook meats and eggs yet we're still able to utilize the protein from them. Is Whey different somehow? What temperature should you not exceed its exposure to?

--------------------------------------------- -

Their Response:

Thank you for contacting Abbott Nutrition. Yes, the 100% Whey Protein powder can be reconstituted and heated without destroying the nutrients. Whey protein is a soluble protein source that can more easily withstand the heating process with less coagulation compared to many other proteins. Heating of the reconstituted whey protein under typical home-heating methods will not reduce the protein quality. Whey protein can be mixed into several recipes to help increase the protein content of the food (see the Eating-for-LIFE book and the Body-for-LIFE website for recipes). Under standard home-heating or cooking temperatures, the nutrients, primarily protein, are not destroyed and still provide a readily digestible, high quality protein. The other nutrients, such as calcium, potassium and sodium are quite stable in heat and will not be destroyed. However, we do not recommend reconstitution of the EAS 100% Whey protein and then boiling the solution because the organoleptic qualities will be affected. (e.g. flavor and odor can be compromised)

Side Note: Coagulation is involved with the denaturation of proteins under certain stressors, such as heat. An example of protein coagulation is when we cook eggs and the egg whites turn from a clear liquid to a white solid. This is a heat-induced physical change to the protein but this does not reduce the protein quality.

Please let us know if we can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,

Sean

EAS Fitness Advisor

----------------------------

My final comments:

Heat will obviously change molecules (and if you heat organics hot enough, you're left with carbon black). However I don't suspect that the heat of freshly brewed coffee is enough for most of us to be concerned that our whey protein is not effective.  Since your body has to break them down into the base amino acids anyway, I don't really see the problem here.  Again, it seems like the difference between raw and cooked eggs or pasteurized vs unpasteurized milk.  Maybe you're getting more nutritional value if you're a raw food fanatic, but for most of us, it's probably in the noise (statistically insignificant compared to the rest of our diets).   Cool

If I were a professional natural body builder trying to put on that extra pound of muscle while staying at 4-6% fat, maybe I'd be concerned, but I seriously doubt most of us are at that level here.  Laughing

ds! thank you so much for that information and taking out of your time to search for it!

I was really starting to get annoyed with all the debate going on and I myself was starting to wonder if it had a major importance ( I still have my doubts though)

I guess body builders can worry about this more than us....still I like my whey cold. I hate coming up with gooey whey...but I bet that baking it that wont be a problem? maybe it will.  Never have I done this so I wouldnt know.

also those no-bake cookies sound great :) I hope that info is right (at least it seems so)

I still think heating whey is kind of dumb...but thats just my personal opinion :) no offense!

thanks again ;)

Original Post by for_zev:

Original Post by bananee:

It affects how the body digests it.

also some of its nutritional value is lost when heated.

As does with ANY protein.  Whey is not unique in that respect.

Do you cook with ricotta cheese?  Ricotta is whey.

 But the difference is Whey powder does not have to be heated like eggs and those things you cook with. If you eat the eggs raw you gain MORE nutrition value from them, parts of the amino acids are destroyed or malformed changing there functionality and making them non-bioavailable. While this clearly does not destroy all the protein value it does destroy some, so why? With Whey there is no need at all.

Original Post by dr1zztth3hunt3r:

Original Post by for_zev:

Original Post by bananee:

It affects how the body digests it.

also some of its nutritional value is lost when heated.

As does with ANY protein.  Whey is not unique in that respect.

Do you cook with ricotta cheese?  Ricotta is whey.

 But the difference is Whey powder does not have to be heated like eggs and those things you cook with. If you eat the eggs raw you gain MORE nutrition value from them, parts of the amino acids are destroyed or malformed changing there functionality and making them non-bioavailable. While this clearly does not destroy all the protein value it does destroy some, so why? With Whey there is no need at all.

that was what I was trying to get across. At the same time its not as important as we may have thought or maybe there is a lot more damaged done to whey when we cook it. Thats why I still dont take my chances....I wont cook it. If it loses nutritional value or not....thats for the people who cook it to worry....that wont be my case :) and it shouldnt be yours either, I bet you wont heat it either. I mean whey protien was made for it to be drank as shakes and stuff....still I hope that when people do heat it it doenst cause health complications as mentioned in those reports I found....Hopefully someday a real study on this will come out, til then I will still have it like i do...in nice cold beverages, cereals that are cold, and no-bake yummy recipes :) You can never be too sure.

 

#33  
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Thats a lot of useful information bananee. But i have another question. While it is right to say that Protein folding might be affected by heating them and whey should not ideallybe mixed with hot liquids, What happens during the making of whey protein?

 

Does the process of making whey affect its molecular integrity in any way? Because i am sure they heat it and filter it in a lot of different ways..?

I will stop taking any supplements if thats the case..Prions are deadly and there seems to be no treatment available as of now.

Denaturing?  What about when you eat something and your body heats it up?  

Original Post by bananee:

here's another recipe I found :)

another batch of no-bake cookies made with chocolate whey protein.

 

http://www.answerfitness.com/80/healthy-no-ba ke-cookies-healthy-recipes/

Bananee, 

I don't have peanut butter. Is it necessary? also can I replace the kashi cereal with irish oatmeal ( cooked and cooled)??

#36  
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Original Post by warose:

Thats a lot of useful information bananee. But i have another question. While it is right to say that Protein folding might be affected by heating them and whey should not ideallybe mixed with hot liquids, What happens during the making of whey protein?

 

Does the process of making whey affect its molecular integrity in any way? Because i am sure they heat it and filter it in a lot of different ways..?

I will stop taking any supplements if thats the case..Prions are deadly and there seems to be no treatment available as of now.

According to all I have read Prion disease is the result of faulty protein folding and possibly an imbalance of certain nutrients in the process of this folding.   Denaturation causes proteins to unfold.   What I cannot learn is whether this is an issue after ingestion and digestion, at which time the proteins are broken down into the needed amino acids, why I have been reluctant in making whey protein a part of my diet.  

I also read an article about prion disease that lead me to believe that the disease was caused more by the cows ingesting feeds that contained certain bacteria that promoted prion disease.  On the otherhand, grass fed cows may often  end up eating their own fecal matter, another possibility for prion disease.

I do not think that the temperature at which the body functions is enough heat to affect proteins.  

I think the real issue here is for one to use one's thinking cap when researching and learning about the various nutrional recommendations and whether or not some website is promoting the product they are touting as beneficial to one's health.   Corporations and individuals invest money into products and they want to sell them and the internet is a world wide space to promote those products regardless of the truthfulness of what one is selling.

My favorite cliche' is Caveat Emptor, buyer beware.

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