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almond vs soy vs cow's milk


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What are the pros and cons of each of the following milks: almond, soy,cow's? Are they all good for you?

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Cow's milk is a very simple, natural wholefood.  Almond milk (the type you can buy) tends to contain a lot of extra bits and pieces  (flavours, colours, thickeners, synthetic vitamins, salt) to make it taste and look like milk... so a much more processed product with much of the nutrition added in.  If, like me, you think processed foods should be reduced in the diet you'd say that was a slight 'con'.  Cow's milk also performs differently in cooking to almond milk

If you are intolerant to dairy products or if you have a moral objection to milk e.g. veganism, then almond milk isn't a bad substitute.  And if you drink either in moderation they are fine.

I don't buy much almond or soy milk but I do once in a while. I happen to have some almond milk in the fridge now and it's ingredients are all natural with added vitamins. No articial flavours or colours or bizarre ingredients.   Same with the organic soy milk, all natural ingredients with added vitamins.  Processed yes, but a reasonable alternative if you don't want to drink the mik of another animal, that itself is also highly processed and from questionable sources, to some people anyway. 

Fresh milk is usually filtered and pasteurised.... is that what you define as 'highly processed'?

I'm gonna have to agree with gi-jane on this one.  Cow's milk is very simple and I think it tastes a whole lot better that soy and almond milk.  As for it being "highly processed" again gotta agree with gi-jane.  As for Johnny's "drink the mik of another animal" comment, do you wanna try drinking breast milk? Bleh, i don't.  lol.  I don't mean to bust your chops, johnny but you left yourself wide open with that one.

Original Post by gi-jane:

Fresh milk is usually filtered and pasteurised.... is that what you define as 'highly processed'?

i think he's referring to the artificial state of 'continual pregnancy' that the cows are kept in, and the giant load of antibiotics that the cows have to take to make the milk safer.  And maybe also the 'stress horomones' that the cows release into their bodies because they're living a life of captivity etc.

Cow's milk shouldn't be 'weird' but the whole 'factory farming' thing causes milk to be questionable.

I switch between almond (40 cal/cup) and regular milk (120 cal/cup) and avoid soy milk (120 cal/cup).

I use almond milk to cut down in my calorie load in the coffees/teas I drink.... I usually rotate between 1/4 cup 1% or 2% milk, almond milk, or no milk. "real milk" is a 'treat', 'almond milk' is a sacrifice, and 'no milk' is just plain restricting calories and enjoying coffee 'in it's natural state'.

I put almond milk in my cereal and my oatmeal. To cut calories, basically.

I don't drink almond milk as a beverage.  I have had hot almond milk with honey but that's just as a treat if I have a sore tummy. It's not the worst flavour but it's not as good as regular milk.  But again.  It's 60% less calories per cup.

My days of drinking warm milk and honey are gone, It's too many calories for a cup of milk and honey that goes "gulp gulp gone" :)

Original Post by nmw_nmw:

Cow's milk shouldn't be 'weird' but the whole 'factory farming' thing causes milk to be questionable.

No disrespect but if you go down the route of equating commercial agricultural practices with what happens when raw materials are broken down, mixed up, added to and packaged up in a factory environment you'd describe every single natural foodstuff from apples to zucchini as 'highly processed'.  

An organic certification (at least in the UK) ensures good animal welfare practices as well as an absence of unnecessary treatments. 

Original Post by gi-jane:

Original Post by nmw_nmw:

Cow's milk shouldn't be 'weird' but the whole 'factory farming' thing causes milk to be questionable.

No disrespect but if you go down the route of equating commercial agricultural practices with what happens when raw materials are broken down, mixed up, added to and packaged up in a factory environment you'd describe every single natural foodstuff from apples to zucchini as 'highly processed'.  

An organic certification (at least in the UK) ensures good animal welfare practices as well as an absence of unnecessary treatments. 

I think the debate as to milk's health benefits is an extremely hot topic. I am not really that well versed in it.  But I was referring to 'non organic milk' and it's shortcomings (to which i'm not exactly sure about).  The whole thing is quite fuzzy in my mind - plus there's political agendas behind both campaigns (animal welfare proponents vs. dairy farmers)

But I think organic milk is a better idea.  If you're rich :)

Organic dairy isn't that much more expensive ... not here, anyway.  I can get a litre of organic semi-skimmed 1.136l (2 pint) for £1.03 and the conventional equivalent is £0.86.  I wouldn't call the extra 17p all that extravagant...

Realise that milk production is controversial but that's a different thing to calling the end product 'highly processed'.

in the US you can opt for non-RGB (i think that's the one) milk, which is the current trend.  That one's not too much more expensive in my area.  However it's quite a leap to full-organic/free range price.

In any case, the whole milk issue is honestly way too complex to talk about here.  I  don't understand half of what I hear, and my original opinion of milk comes from going to a Hopkins thing when I was about 12 and one of the professors' speeches mentioned how broccoli was better than milk for everything milk was good for.  I pretty much lived by that for years because i dislike milk except as an add-in.

Nutrition aside, I think each has their own place.  Nonfat milk is good when you can't get any of the others, and it's about tied with soy for use in cereal (tastewise).  Almond is the best in coffee (especially vanilla almond- yum) or tea.  For cooking, you've gotta have the real thing.

Great smoothie:

- vanilla almond milk

- lime juice

- brown sugar

- ice

- banana

As we grow older most of us can't digest milk that well. We can't drink as much as when we were kids and if you have problems with inflammation you might want to leave out dairy completly.

However, milk is an easy source of calcium (Easy as in having a cappucino on the go instead of green vegetable soup) and we women need quite a lot of that.

It's good to not regard milk as a beverage, but rather as a 'proper' food or maybe as a treat (like wine).

Soymilk comes with a host of potential problems that are still being investigated. It cointains phytooestrogen (have I spelled that right?) which can cause problems and a lot of the worlds Soya is genetically ingeneered, so personally I never quite trust the labels.

Rice milk is a bit watery and incredibly expensive. Tastes differ with the brand.

Yes, there are meds in commercial milk. Milk gets harder to digest when pasteurized, but without pasteurization they can teem with unpleasant bacteria.

There is no perfect answer to the dilemma. I'll stick with Paracelsus: 'Poison is a matter of quantities'

:-)

#12  
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I'm vegan, so I'm not going to touch on cow's milk.

Almond milk – Lower calorie (60-40 calories a cup). Less protein (like 0-1g). Doesn't separate in hot beverages.

Soy milk - Higher calorie (80-120 calories a cup). More protein (7g). Can separate in coffee if it's not warmed first.

With both, it's better to try a bunch of brands, because they all taste different. I tend to prefer the unsweetened of both.

Jane, I include everything that happens to the cow from birth, until the milk arrives on my table part of the processing.   If the cows were raised in pasture, ate their normal, natural diet of grasses, not raised in pens and fed  mostly corn because it's cheap, a very unnatural diet for a cow, the milk was unpasteurized as it was for millenia then I'd consider it lightly processed.  Milk is popular for one reason only...marketing and therefore big profits.  It causes some difficulty in digestion for more than half the population of the world.

I believe if we are going to consume the by products or the flesh of animals, they should be raised naturally.  I don't believe the milk or dairy you get from cattle raised in pens and fed crap is what we should be eating...but that's my opinion.  I never eat pork and rarely eat beef for that reason.  I buy all my poultry from one farmer, whose farm I have visited and have seen how he raises his animals.  I buy emu from a local farmer here, whose farm I have also visited and I know what his animals eat and how they are raised.  

I developed an allergy to milk recently (in my 20s). Milk is all great and all...if you know it comes from a cow, kept by a farmer (I used to get it delivered by someone who made a small business that way - delivered to a dozen people). I know a lot of people who got adult acne because of milk, and after quitting that, their problem went away. Milk is great IF and ONLY IF you can digest it properly, but if you go by the propaganda on TV you'd think it was as crucial as drinking water, and if you can't drink it, there's something wrong with YOU. When the truth is, lactose intolerance is the norm on the planet, and people who can drink milk into their old age are the freaks. Whatever.

I wouldn't touch the regular stuff in the supermarkets and even the organic label doesn't really guarantee all that people undertand by that.

 

Rice milk - very expensive.

Soy milk - There hasn't been any clear proof of anything bad, and the media jumps on any study (weather reliable and significant or not).  You get more horrible estrogen problems from your BC pill and those HAVE been proven. I have a low fat, calcium fortified one that's just 35 cal/100 ml.

Almond milk - ideal, but too expensive, and too laborious to do at home. And has a LOT of calories (the most out of all the commercial ones I've seen)

 

#15  
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Original Post by suzushii:

 

 

 

 

 

Almond milk - ideal, but too expensive, and too laborious to do at home. And has a LOT of calories (the most out of all the commercial ones I've seen)

 

 Actually unsweetened almond has way less calories than soy, rice or cows milk.  The one I have for coffee is 40 cals per cup.

I looovee almond milk, has a nutty taste, mm nuts c: lol...but yeah! i get the unsweetened kind. and there's so much in the jug...and it lasts forever so you don't have to worry about it spoiling so i really don't think it's a bad price. but if you get the non-refrigerated kind then yes, those are expensive lil buggers.

 

OK I was in a family of dairy farmers. The cows were not kept pregnant all the time, they were not kept in pens, they roamed acres and acres of beautiful pasture land. They were milked twice a day, 2p and 2am, they were fed exceptionally well, were not injected with anything unless a cow became sick and then that cow was taken out of the herd and treated until well and milk was free of anitbiotics.  They collected the milk and took samples of it and labeled it. When the milk gets to the plant that sample was tested and if any antibiotics or anything was found in our milk then we had to buy the WHOLE truck of milk. This is an 18 wheeler tanker of milk and the cost of that to us was around $16,000. So it was with extreme care that we made sure the cows were not milked who were on anything. These cows were practically pets and all have names.  We milked about 120 cows. So don't go lumping all milk as bad because there are good dairy farms.

Nice rant, kwil - only about a year too late ;-)

 

*zombie cows brainzzzzzzzz*

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