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amount of meat - size of deck of cards?


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ive read in various places that for a normal dinner, about 3 oz of meat is desirable, which is about the size of a deck of cards.

this is great for me, because im not a big fan of meat (but eat it anyway). but i was wondering: looking at what people normally eat for dinners (or any other meal with meat actually), especially within my family, it does nnot look like a deck of cards....more like 5 deck of cards! or atleast 3...

am i wrong to think that 3 oz seems quite little when it comes to normal consumption? or is it just that that is only one serving, and you need 2 or 3 servings total?

19 Replies (last)
nope - 3 oz - one serving.  and you're right, most people eat four or five times that much.  are you starting to get why 35% of the population is overweight?
I think it depends somewhat on your personal stats. 
tr, the number of servings recommended in a day changes.  but nobody should eat a 12oz steak.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-alime nt/myguide-monguide/index_e.html

this is a good resource.  you can enter you person stats as well as you preferences (no red meat, even favourite veggies) and get a personal food guide.
#4  
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It's a good guideline to keep in mind...but once you understand the basics of nutrition it isn't a big deal to have more than one serving in a meal. If it's lean meat, and you're eating it with a lot of vegetables, and you were active that day, I'd say more than 1 serving is preferable. And/or maybe you did not get much fat or protein earlier in the day. It does all depend on the situation.
I think it is important to know what a serving size is and the "deck of card = 3 oz." is a good visual.  I don't think you can say nobody should eat a 12 oz. steak.  Situations vary as pointed out above.
well, i'm saying it. 
What about diabetics? I would think it's far more sensible for them to down three times the serving size of meat than four apples. Fruit and some veggies = carbs = bad!
According to the link above, I need a 9 oz. steak each day and it didn't even take my size or activity level into account.
"three servings of meat or meat substitute" is not the same as "a 9oz steak."  beef is probably the most difficult natural food to digest, and eating three servings in one sitting is punishing to your digestive system.  doing so on a regular basis is a good way to get colon cancer.
What are some bad ways to get colon cancer?
What do diabetics do then? My father is a diabetic and was told to eat lots of meat. Now I'm not saying he's healthy, for that matter he downs more junk food than I do every night, but his doctor strongly advocates meat.
if you're asking me, you've got the wrong person; i don't know anything about diabetes.  but there are plenty of ways to get extra protein that don't involve eating four servings of beef in one sitting.
Lifted from this site: http://www.soilandhealth.org/02/0201hyglibcat /020126shelton.orthotrophy/020126.ch19.htm

"Digestive speed and efficiency vary with individuals and with circumstances. However, in general, foods leave the average stomach about as follows:--fruits, vegetables, bread, eggs, lamb, beef, pork, chicken, nuts, guinea hen. Carbohydrates usually leave the stomach rapidly, proteins remain longer. Foods requiring longer time for gastric digestion are not necessarily harder to digest; it is often merely that the process of digestion is different."
Original Post by miiniiskiirt:

What about diabetics? I would think it's far more sensible for them to down three times the serving size of meat than four apples. Fruit and some veggies = carbs = bad!

No.  Well, maybe yes, maybe no.  It depends on the person AND it depends on the meat.  My grandmother has age-onset Type II diabetes (she was probably in her late 50s when diagnosed) - and red meat was the worst for her.  If she ate a hamburger patty it would raise her sugar higher than if she ate a piece of cake.

But for my husband, who was diagnosed last summer, protein in any form is not a problem ... beef tips, meatloaf, steak, chicken ... his sugar stays fine through all these.  AND his endocrinologist allows him a LOT of carbs per day (over 200 g.)

I agree with feanor, too.  If you plan for 9 oz of protein in a day (or more, which you DO need if you work out) and you don't eat any at breakfast ... then yeah, for lunch and for dinner you would probably do 5 or 6 ounces each.

Original Post by pgeorgian:

beef is probably the most difficult natural food to digest, and eating three servings in one sitting is punishing to your digestive system.  doing so on a regular basis is a good way to get colon cancer.

scientific study that shows this, please?  and I mean from REAL scientists, not a bunch of flying-wing-nut PETA folks who just don't want any of us to eat animal products.

Here's something I found ... and I deliberately did not post any of the findings by any beef companies or cattle associations.  Conflict of interest.

The myths around meat

The myths around eating red meat seems to have grown as beef consumption has fallen. Consumers falsely believe that red meat should be avoided by people with high cholesterol, or beef causes cancer or that it is "hard" to digest and sits in your gut for days. None of these myths are true.

... Red meat and cancer, especially bowel cancer is a common myth but again the evidence is very weak. A large Eurpoean study of 478,000 people showed that a large intake of meat - almost twice what Australians consume, and especially processed meats such as salami and bacon were slightly more likely to suffer bowel cancer then those who ate no meat.

Those who tended to base their diet on more fresh meat and include fish were at no greater risk. Again it seems it's about keeping it fresh and keeping it balanced. Fill at least ½ - ¾ of the plate with vegies and grains and you'll be adding more of the protective factors.

Link:  http://www.abc.net.au/canberra/stories/s17261 23.htm

The reason the 'right' portions look so small is that we've all got used to seeing bigger ones as standard.   'Going large' is the norm so perceptions are skewed.   You go to France... home of the full-fat cheese, the 'pate de foie gras', creme chantilly and many other potentially artery-clogging culinary treasures... and you never get served more than a modest portion of anything in a restaurant.  Everything's eaten quite slowly, in a relaxed manner with a convivial atmosphere and a sip of wine.   Lunch takes 2 hours.. not because they're troughing through a 12oz steak and a quart of ice-cream, but because they're taking their time.  Indigestion is therefore never a problem.

I eat 10+ oz T-bones all the time! But I'm very VERY active.

sk33ny and forum, 

I work for a nutrition program and we always refer to USDA guidelines for the average normal weight adult, yes iabout 3 ounces of meat is a serving.  Yes, approxiamately the size of a deck of cards. 

If a person is very active they could probably get away with more servings, but the average American Diet is well out of proportion.  Especially, in restaurants.  Check out MyPyramid.gov.  It shows serving sizes, how many each day of what.  The main thing we also try to tell those we teach, consult your physician if in doubt. 

Meats, cheeses and other animal proteins are good for the body, but in the right portions and the right amount of servings and in the lower fat version. A scary but great video to watch is Super Size Me.  It is a great visual of how out of control the American portion is.

 Hope this helps...

#19  
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Original Post by stellajo:

Original Post by miiniiskiirt:

What about diabetics? I would think it's far more sensible for them to down three times the serving size of meat than four apples. Fruit and some veggies = carbs = bad!

No.  Well, maybe yes, maybe no.  It depends on the person AND it depends on the meat.  My grandmother has age-onset Type II diabetes (she was probably in her late 50s when diagnosed) - and red meat was the worst for her.  If she ate a hamburger patty it would raise her sugar higher than if she ate a piece of cake.

But for my husband, who was diagnosed last summer, protein in any form is not a problem ... beef tips, meatloaf, steak, chicken ... his sugar stays fine through all these.  AND his endocrinologist allows him a LOT of carbs per day (over 200 g.)

I agree with feanor, too.  If you plan for 9 oz of protein in a day (or more, which you DO need if you work out) and you don't eat any at breakfast ... then yeah, for lunch and for dinner you would probably do 5 or 6 ounces each.

It is a physical impossibility for someone to have an insulin/blood sugar response after eating protein. Your body only produces insulin when you eat carbohydrates. I hope I don't have to explain this, as it is fairly simple human/animal biology.

Diabetics tend to eat more protein and fat as they are physically required to cut down on their carb consumption.

3 ounces of meat is a serving. How many servings one should eat varies considerably. I have several friends that eat 12 ounces of meat at a meal, several times a day, and have no weight or health problems.

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