Foods
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Back to Counting but Having Trouble Finding Food...


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I have decided that because of my families history with diabetes that I should be eating as healthy as possible and part of that means eating only whole grains but as little grains as possible. So I have been eating all products that are not bread related. Like eggs and cottage cheese and grapefruit and berries. But I am getting bored with just a few choices. I am so used to eating breads. Can you all give me suggestions of healthy foods I can snack on or healthy meals I could make?

 

Thanks!

Edited Aug 29 2011 21:32 by cellophane_star
Reason: Moved to Foods Forum
13 Replies (last)

Chicken, fish, steamed veggies, whole grain pasta/rice in limited amounts.  Seems I heard about a cookbook or website that was geared toward diabetics.  I bet if you google "diabetic diet" you would find a ton of info :)

Thanks I'll google it right now!

you can eat bread/grains even with diabetes...if you search diabetic recipes there are recipes using rice, pasta, grains and even breads. if you choose whole grains and have a SINGLE serving per meal then you will be able to manage your blood sugar. diabetes is preventable with good lifestyle and diet choices...you don't need to try to restrict an entire food group to prevent diabetes. 

that being said, here are some ideas: 

  1. brown rice stir fried in a tsp or two of oil with mixed veggies, low sodium soy sauce, and lean protein
  2. a whole wheat pita with hummus and lean protein
  3. whole wheat wrap with peanut butter and low sugar fruit preserves
  4. whole wheat waffle topped with sf or low sugar yogurt and nuts
  5. yogurt with nuts and berries
  6. whole grain cereal with low sugar yogurt and berries
  7. sandwich with lean protein, 1 slice cheese, and veggies
  8. salad with lean protein, beans, 1/2 oz cheese, and olive oil/vinegar
  9. seeds and dark chocolate for snacks
  10. popcorn with herbs/spices
  11. grilled cheese with lowfat cheese and added deli meat/protein...cooked in a little bit of oil/butter
  12. veggies with olive oil and parmesan cheese with a slice of ww bread and a piece of lean, grilled protein

Or there are more and more people that have an intolerance to gluten and live gluten free.  I found out a month ago that I need to.  It is a change but I think it has helped me break out of a rut in my diet.  There is so much more than breads out there.  Now when my family has pizza night - I don't even want it as I am enjoying a Mexican shrimp salad with mangos and drizzled in a lime mint dressing ( oil free). 

 

It is a change and esp packing a lunch is not so much finger food but fork food. But tuna salad with celery is more enjoyable to eat than a tuna sandwich any day. 

Good job on jumping in on this early. 

 

Original Post by chrissy1988:

you can eat bread/grains even with diabetes...if you search diabetic recipes there are recipes using rice, pasta, grains and even breads. if you choose whole grains and have a SINGLE serving per meal then you will be able to manage your blood sugar. diabetes is preventable with good lifestyle and diet choices...you don't need to try to restrict an entire food group to prevent diabetes.

I disagree with this strongly. Some diabetics are able to tolerate whole grains in moderation. However, not all of them can. I used to be hypoglycemic, and even a moderate serving of grains would spike my blood sugar (resulting in a crash later). If you have found that you feel better without the grains, don't be afraid to cut them out - there's nothing in whole grains that you can't get from other food sources.

I like to snack on hard boiled eggs, nuts, cut up fruit with nut butters, veggies dipped in guacamole or tuna salad, canned or smoked fish, plain yogurt with fruit and nuts, all-natural beef jerky, and 85% cocoa chocolate.

fair enough..but she doesn't HAVE diabetes...she's trying to prevent it. It's not inherited in a strict sense...it CAN be prevented with a healthy diet, not necessarily one that cuts out whole grains. it sounds like a ploy to join the low carb bandwagon which i do not support. sorry, but that's just my personal opinion. 

Good for you to go preventative with your diet! You're going to be so glad you're paying attention to this kind of thing BEFORE it's an issue.

I'm not diabetic and I don't think it even runs in my family, but I do LOVE healthy cooking. With balance, a diabetic-sensitive diet can be just a healthy choice to begin with. Earlier this year, a coworker of mine gave me this Mediterranean cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Mediterranean-Diabetes- Cookbook-Amy-Riolo/dp/1580403123/ref=sr_1_1?s =books&ie=UTF8&qid=1315408506&sr= 1-1

Different spices, flavorful recipes, and creative diet suggestions, and it includes nutritional information (including carb count) on all recipes. I know a lot of people immediately think "oh, fried falafel and greasy gyros" when they think mediterranean, but not so-- the veggies and proteins involved are amazing, exciting food options, and this book has some great inspirational tips. (and hey, the book's not even that expensive. ;) )

#8  
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Some of my favorite snacks:

1. Greek yogurt with blueberries and some cereal  sprinkled on top

2. half of a Thomas Bagel Thin with 1 wedge of Light Laughing Cow Cheese

3. 6 RF Triscuits & a wedge of Light Laughing Cow Cheese

4. 1 apple

5. Baked chips & salsa

6. 50 calorie Skinny Cow fudge cycles

7. Egg whites

I am a cheese lover, so I love love love Light Laughing Cow Cheese. It now comes in 4 or 5 flavors. It's only 35 calories a wedge and super tasty. I use it in sandwiches, because it's creamy you can skip condiments. It is also tastier than any low cal cheese slice. I have also melted a wedge into a bowl of rice. I imagine it would also be good mixed into pasta.

Eat more vegetables in snack or meal depending on how big your snack is going to be

I know some of these are already mentioned

Mini Vegetable Stir Fry, 

red cabbage, bok choy, celery, bell peppers, onions, Mrs. Dash, Salsa, canned chicken.  

 

Greek Yogurt with Apple Sauce and blue berries, you can use granola too, but I can't because most of them have nuts, sprinkle cinnamon - it lowers blood sugar.  - Oops that's mentioned above.  

Sardines or tuna packed in water.  - Tuna Salad goes well.

 

String Cheese.   Nuts are always good but I am allergic.  

 

black bean taco - either reduced sodium canned beans, your choice of lettuce, and or veggies with Old El Paso Taco stand stuff shells with Newman's Own Salsa- MIld has less than 100mg of Sodium.  

There's Indian Food you can make it home- Showmethecurry.com has a good link for that.  

Try to spice things up again - that's one one way to make things less boring.  Also get used to eating more vegetables.  Make things more colorful.  I have been following a principle called "The Rainbow Diet" so that your body gets all the nutrients it needs through the foods.  

I am diabetic too.  You can have bread, but it should be whole grain.  How much do your blood sugars run? if you don't mind sharing?

Also exercise helps lower blood sugar.  

My father had adult-onset diabetes and at 53 I was teetering on the edge with slightly elevated blood sugar levels. So in June 2010 I decided to also go the preventative route. I switched to whole grain breads/pastas/cereals, etc, which I eat in moderation. It's a rare refined grain product that makes it into my mouth these days. We eat healthy steamed veg and lean meats and fish in all kinds of recipes from Mexican, to Italian to American classics.


In addition, since I was way overweight I cut back to 1500 calories per day and I shoot for an 'A' nutritional rating every day (even though I slip down to 'B+' occasionally). The result is that I'm no longer in diabetes danger and I've lost 98 pounds (still about 30 to go). My doctor is very pleased with my results - and I feel better than I have in years!


Based on that experience, my advice is to cut refined and packaged foods, set your self a calorie goal and log your meals in advance of eating so that you can make sure your diet is well-balanced nutritionally. See if that does the job -- no need in doing something that feels like a boring, hardship no-grain-no-bread diet if you can achieve your goal by tweeking your diet and eating the things you love in a healthy way. Good luck!

I am Type 2 diabetic.  My doctor encourages me to eat from ALL food groups in moderation.  Whole grain, flax seed, quinoa, fruits, veggies, lean, unprocessed meat, healthy fats and even sugar ... in moderation.  If you are craving white bread, you're out of luck.  But with an open mind you will find a ton of whole grain breads that will make you wonder why you waited.  There is such delicious foods to be discovered.

I also suggest that you try new things slowly so if you have an allergic or adverse reaction you will know what caused it.  And when you find a food you love, experiment.  Try it in a salad, make soup with it, etc.  Don't like something?  Move on and find something you do like.

I spent too many years fretting about all the "bad" foods only to discover that if I eat whole, fresh, unprocessed foods, the sky is the limit.

I also started doing some major experimenting with spices.  What an awesome way to change up the same food item by seasoning it differently.  I shop at myspicesage.com and have had a ball researching spices and trying things I never even heard of!

I think what you are doing is awesome!  Be nice and encouraging to yourself and indulge your palate with flavorful, healthy foods.  I promise there are a million (or close to it) things you will find you love once you open the "no I can't eat that" door and discover all the yummy choices.

Try Low GI Carbs.

 

Oatmeal is a great way to start the day with a touch of milk, honey and cinnamon. Then you can be inventive with fruity additions I guess.

Brown Rice is the best for energy! Perfect fried with veggies & an egg in a little olive oil, then seasoned with lime juice and soy. Or served with home made vegetarian chilli, coconut thai style curry & more!

Then Pitta & Rye breads are a great alternative. Not as stodgy and easier on the tummy. Try topping with cottage cheese, smoked salmon & cream cheese, cream cheese, avocado & pepper, falafel and hummus, then my favourite ever hot pitta recipe has to be pesto, grilled mediteranian veggies, goats cheese. 

Are potatoes an option in moderation? They are extremely versatile, and the sweet variety is particularly healthy. 

Original Post by foodisnotlove:

I am Type 2 diabetic.  My doctor encourages me to eat from ALL food groups in moderation.  Whole grain, flax seed, quinoa, fruits, veggies, lean, unprocessed meat, healthy fats and even sugar ... in moderation.  If you are craving white bread, you're out of luck.  But with an open mind you will find a ton of whole grain breads that will make you wonder why you waited.  There is such delicious foods to be discovered.

I also suggest that you try new things slowly so if you have an allergic or adverse reaction you will know what caused it.  And when you find a food you love, experiment.  Try it in a salad, make soup with it, etc.  Don't like something?  Move on and find something you do like.

I spent too many years fretting about all the "bad" foods only to discover that if I eat whole, fresh, unprocessed foods, the sky is the limit.

I also started doing some major experimenting with spices.  What an awesome way to change up the same food item by seasoning it differently.  I shop at myspicesage.com and have had a ball researching spices and trying things I never even heard of!

I think what you are doing is awesome!  Be nice and encouraging to yourself and indulge your palate with flavorful, healthy foods.  I promise there are a million (or close to it) things you will find you love once you open the "no I can't eat that" door and discover all the yummy choices.

thank you for this. all things in moderation :) great philosophy! 

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