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How do you calculate cooking spray? and why do different types of eggs have different values on CC?


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For example, Today I made scrambled eggs. I used cooking spray, and I have no idea how to calculate that. Any ideas?

 

Also, eggs seem to have different values for the way they are cooked. I understand if less fat is used, but scrambled eggs have a C+ and fried eggs have a B-.  I wonder why that is? They both employ the same method of cooking, the only real difference is that with scrambled the eggs are mixed up more.

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Original Post by fluffymonkeyem:

For example, Today I made scrambled eggs. I used cooking spray, and I have no idea how to calculate that. Any ideas?

Well, the nutrition label on a cooking spray can likes to suggest that one is using zero calories.  But the truth is that most of us use quite a few "shots"of the spray when we coat, say, a skillet with it.

I would suggest that 10 - 20 would be in the neighborhood of the calories used.

I switched to using Misto pump spray bottles.  I guestimate for calories that I use 20 calories of evoo such as when I "fry" a couple of eggs or a "grilled" cheese sandwich.

Also, eggs seem to have different values for the way they are cooked. I understand if less fat is used, but scrambled eggs have a C+ and fried eggs have a B-.  I wonder why that is? They both employ the same method of cooking, the only real difference is that with scrambled the eggs are mixed up more.

I am surmising that more surface of the eggs when scrambled are going to pick up more oil than, say, the surface of one or two eggs fried hard. 

 

It's common to ad milk to eggs when making Scrambled Eggs.  If you don't do this then it won't matter if you scramble of fry.

There should be nutritional info on the cooking spray but I have to assume the calories are minimal.  I use about a half a pat of butter, which is about 20 calories, instead of spray oil.

do you guys think the amount of calories/fat is enough to even bother with listing? I'm finding the 0 second sprays on here, but they never have a higher calorie amount than zero, and we all no that isn't right.

fluffymonkeyem:

Probably, for the majority of us, no, it would not be important to record the calories from cooking spray. 

I, personally, when I am tracking calories consumed, like to include everything I eat/drink (including coffee calories). I do it because I like making, adding to, and studying spreadsheets and data.  Even so, there is a certain percentage of guestimation for some of the things I consume.

But since 3500 calories = a pound, 10 calories here or 20 calories there should not make a difference.  However, I suppose if, theoretically, a person went 30 calories past maintenance each day for a year that could equate to around a 3-pound weight gain.  And if he/she went 10 years doing that -- that would be over 30 pounds gained.  LOL!

I use Whole, Raw for my eggs if I scramble them, boil them or nuke them in the microwave and I used Whole, Fried if I fry them since CC takes into account oil.

For the Whole, Raw, I use the values closest to what my carton says. I use large eggs which are 70 calories.

For your eggs, I would do however many eggs you used as whole, what you used for liquid other than water (milk or cream etc), and maybe 5-10 cals for the spray. I rarely count sprays since I use so little of it. But when I fry eggs, I use actual olive oil so I log that as fried.

I don't count/log anything over 50 calories unless I'm eating more than one which will obviously total over 50 calories or if it adds protein (I'm monitoring that right now - so I will count egg whites, which are 10 cals per egg, for example). I mostly eat whole eggs anyway.

Get a spray bottle (the mist kind, not squirt) and add your own oil. First, you'll know what all went into it, and second, it's easier to measure (by seeing how many squirts it takes to fill a teaspoon. Thanks, Mr. Owl! It's not three!)--and it's economical as well as ecological, since you can refill it as you go.

Also wanted to add that milk does make scrambled eggs fluffier, but my mother swears by nuking her scrambled eggs in the microwave. They get super-fluffy and require no oil.

If you like fluffy scrambled eggs, fried or nuked doesn't matter, try adding cream or ricotta and some water. So fluffy and happy~.

about the oil: i'm thinking it's about 9 calories per 1 second spray. my can of spray oil says that 1/4 second spray = .25 grams. there are no other ingredients beside propellant so it follows that a 1 second spray is a gram of oil, which is about 9 calories. i read somewhere that if a serving contains less than 5 calories, they're allowed to mark it as zero. sneaky.

Original Post by fluffymonkeyem:

do you guys think the amount of calories/fat is enough to even bother with listing? I'm finding the 0 second sprays on here, but they never have a higher calorie amount than zero, and we all no that isn't right.

No, I never count low fat cooking spray...its like eating celery in my opinion, you burn more by using it :P

I read an article not long ago that revealed that a 9-second spray is about 50 calories. That 50 adds up if you use cooking spray often like I do!

I track it as canola oil - about 0.2 tbsp - which gives me around 30-60 calories, depending on the amount I estimated that I used.

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I use a Misto rather than buying cooking spray because it's cheaper & I don't have to worry about propellant.

If I just use one quick spray, I probably won't record it. However, if I'm spraying a pan of veggies or broiling chicken or fish, I'll record 1 tsp. of oil (sometimes more).

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