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Calories from frying


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hey,

I had a big fight with my mom about this today and I needed answers.

I made myself a grilled cheese sandwich today.   I put like 1.5 to 2 tsp of becel original margarine on it, which is like 70 calories.

 I make my sandwich in just a sandwich maker.

 Are there added calories when I make it in the sandwich maker?

 

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No, as long as you counted the calories for the margarine, there are no added calories.  There would only be extra calories if you deep fried the sandwich.  When you deep fry something, oil/grease permeates it and that is very difficult to count calories for.  (PS I'm a mom too)

 Debbie

#2  
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Original Post by dlcorbitt:

No, as long as you counted the calories for the margarine, there are no added calories.  There would only be extra calories if you deep fried the sandwich.  When you deep fry something, oil/grease permeates it and that is very difficult to count calories for.  (PS I'm a mom too)

 Debbie

 If you properly deep fry, most of the oil does not penetrate the surface.

#3  
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I think that peanut oil is the only one that doesn't permeate. Is there a "proper" way to deep fry??
It has to do with the temperature of the oil. If it's not hot enough, it will "soak" into the food. People who deep fry turkeys swear it's the only way to go--the turkey turns out moist and delicious (but not oily).
#5  
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Original Post by anmoore23:

I think that peanut oil is the only one that doesn't permeate. Is there a "proper" way to deep fry??

 Any oil, if heated to the proper temperature (it varies slightly by oil) will not go much past the surface.

Kind of off topic - are you able to get the Becel Spray where you live?  What a freakin' godsend - it's 5 calories for 10 sprays and you get all the flavour!
Original Post by sophcesca:

It has to do with the temperature of the oil. If it's not hot enough, it will "soak" into the food. People who deep fry turkeys swear it's the only way to go--the turkey turns out moist and delicious (but not oily).

Amen to that!  I am here in Louisiana where the deep frying turkey thing got started.  It is the juiciest thing you have ever put in your mouth.  We inject them with seasoning too!  The skin is absolutley to die for, and oh, so bad for you.  Love it!

How hot does the oil have to get before it doesn't penetrate the surface? I don't deep fry anything, but I often shallow fry (which I've heard is worse), and I'd love to know the healthiest way to do it.
#9  
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It really depends on the oil.

Certain oils like Extra Virgin Olive Oil aren't good for deep frying because they have a low smoke point.

You need to get above 350 degrees F to minimize the amount of oil that gets absorbed. 

Damn, that's the oil I use. I like the taste of it better than others. I've heard peanut oil is good, is that right? I haven't actually tried frying in it yet (have a bottle sitting in the cupboard waiting though), but I'm a bit worried it'll change the taste of the food. Which other oils are good for frying in?
#11  
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Soybean oil can get the hottest, peanut is good, Canola is ok but not great.

Lard and Tallow are pretty decent too, but they are mostly saturated fat so most people don't like using them. 

Whenever I fry anything, which I have not for awhile, (and we fry a lot of things here in the south) I use canola oil because it is the basically the same fat and caloric content as olive.  We use peanut oil to fry turkeys.  Canola has a good flash point, and usually everything is fried at 350.
#13  
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I've been using saflower oil for the past 5 weeks.  Has anybody else used it and know it has a high flash point?  And if I'm understanding this correctly, I should let it get above 350 before applying the food in it (i.e. turkey, chicken, veggies)?
You have to be careful about letting it get too much over 350....the outside will blacken and burn and the inside will be raw...(the voice of experience here Wink)
#15  
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Thanks!  Got another question, pretty much along the same lines.  I believe I read once that the act of heating up or burning oil (sorry don't remember which) is what causes the whole "partially hydrogenated" thing to begin with (i.e. deep frying french fries at fast food joints, etc...).  Does this hold true for these plant oil?
Looks like that is past my professional scope of frying....anyone?

Thanks everyone! I'm not too keen on canola, it might be all myth and propaganda, but I've heard that it causes macular degeneration (bad eyesight) and isn't really very good for you. I'll have to give the peanut oil a go soon, and see if I can find soybean oil. Any advice on the taste? 

I think it's the burning of the oil that causes partial hydrogenation, and I think that it mostly applies to plant oils (from what I understand saturated fats are hydrogenated anyway - I think that's what the saturated refers to, they have as many hydrogen molecules attached as possible. Disclaimer: I could be completely wrong here).

#18  
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Original Post by jakinkale:

Thanks everyone! I'm not too keen on canola, it might be all myth and propaganda, but I've heard that it causes macular degeneration (bad eyesight) and isn't really very good for you. I'll have to give the peanut oil a go soon, and see if I can find soybean oil. Any advice on the taste? 

I think it's the burning of the oil that causes partial hydrogenation, and I think that it mostly applies to plant oils (from what I understand saturated fats are hydrogenated anyway - I think that's what the saturated refers to, they have as many hydrogen molecules attached as possible. Disclaimer: I could be completely wrong here).

Canola is fine.

Partial Hydrogenation involves forcing hydrogen atoms into the oil at temps above 800 degrees F, using a catalyst like Platinum to make the reaction happen; you couldn't do that at home even if you wanted to.

Original Post by dm84:

Original Post by jakinkale:

Thanks everyone! I'm not too keen on canola, it might be all myth and propaganda, but I've heard that it causes macular degeneration (bad eyesight) and isn't really very good for you. I'll have to give the peanut oil a go soon, and see if I can find soybean oil. Any advice on the taste? 

I think it's the burning of the oil that causes partial hydrogenation, and I think that it mostly applies to plant oils (from what I understand saturated fats are hydrogenated anyway - I think that's what the saturated refers to, they have as many hydrogen molecules attached as possible. Disclaimer: I could be completely wrong here).

Canola is fine.

Partial Hydrogenation involves forcing hydrogen atoms into the oil at temps above 800 degrees F, using a catalyst like Platinum to make the reaction happen; you couldn't do that at home even if you wanted to.

DM84-are you a nuclear physicist or something?  Tongue out

#20  
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Lol no, but partial hydrogenation has been used for many decades, and the process is pretty well documented.
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